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Article

John M. Schechter and J. Richard Haefer

An ensemble of gourd (puro) trumpets of various sizes, used in the Chota river valley of Imbabura and Carchi provinces of Ecuador. Formed in the late 19th century by Afro-Ecuadorians without access to Western military band instruments, the ensemble includes several puros (...

Article

In military and brass bands, the valved instrument in E♭ or low B♭ corresponding to the orchestral tuba.

The term is also used with other instruments, e.g. bass flute.

Article

Michael Webb

Both a struck aerophone (alternatively, an idiophone) comprising a set of three or five tuned bamboo tubes, and the name for an ensemble including these instruments. It was featured in popular music in the Solomon Islands (its place of origin) and parts of Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu for several decades from the 1970s. The primary instrument is derived from the handheld tuned stamping tube, and comprises a set of 7- to 9-cm-diameter bamboos, open at both ends and graduated in lengths of up to 2 metres, arranged in raft form. A band will include at least three sets; each set is commonly tuned (to a guitar) 1–3–5–6–8 (or 1–3–5), usually in a low register, to sound one of the three primary chords in a given key. With flexible paddles players vigorously slap in succession one open end of each bamboo in a boogie-woogie rhythmic-melodic pattern that outlines a triad; sets alternate according to changes in harmony. The ensemble includes guitars and accompanies harmonized singing. A related Solomon Islands ensemble without guitars yet employing Westernized tuning, involves multiple sets of panpipes, ‘pantrumpets’, and the rack-mounted bass ...

Article

A type of wind band, consisting solely of brass instruments and percussion, which originated in the 1820s. See Band, §IV.

Band (i), §IV: Brass bands

Article

Eluma  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Stopped flute ensemble of the Amba and Yira peoples of the border region of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The individual pipes are made from a plant locally known as lumaluma. The stopped lower ends of the pipes are decorated with tufts of animal hair or tassels of raffia, and Amba pipes are sometimes covered with plaited raffia. The instruments are played by men and boys, for various social and ceremonial occasions. Players dance in a circle around an ensemble of drums; participation is usually restricted to members of the same extended family or warrior group. Mbuti Pygmies in the same area also play similar pipes....

Article

Musical wind ensemble usually consisting of three oboes and a bass oboe or bassoon with snare drums, popular in military units from the end of the 17th century until the rise of Harmoniemusik . The term denoted the military band as well as the instrumental combination, a practice that continued in some countries into the 19th century....

Article

Laba bu  

Margaret J. Kartomi and Andrew C. McGraw

Ensemble of two to four end-blown buffalo horns (bu) and two or three single-head drums (laba), of the central Ngada region of Flores, Indonesia. The horns range from 30 to 40 cm long and each produce one note. The drums, called ...

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Obscure stopped flute ensemble of the Pende people of the southwestern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The ensemble comprises five cylindrical tubes of bamboo or cane of graduated lengths and pitches, presumably played in hocket.

J.-S. Laurenty: La systématique des aérophones de l’Afrique centrale (Tervuren, 1974), 208....

Article

Terry E. Miller

In Cambodia, the primary classical ensemble played at court ceremonies, some Buddhist festivals, to accompany the large shadow theatre, masked drama, and dance drama. Both the ensemble and its name are closely related to similar ensembles in Thailand (piphat) and Laos (sep nyai/piphat...

Article

A type of mixed wind band, the principal function of which is concert giving. See Band, §III .