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Murray Lefkowitz

A comic or grotesque interlude in a Masque , normally preceding the terminal dances of the masquers. There were usually more than one and they consisted of a variety of spoken dialogue, pantomime, singing and dancing. Unlike the grand masquing dances, which were performed by a group of nobility from the floor of the hall, antimasques were usually danced by professional actors from the stage....

Article

See Stravinsky, Igor

Article

M. Elizabeth C. Bartlet

A stage work in which a dramatic story is conveyed through gesture, dance and instrumental music. It developed in part as a reaction against the divertissement in opera, in which dance is designed to delight the eye and depict a general mood, and the opera-ballet...

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Company founded in Brussels in 1960.

Article

Alison E. Arnold

The term Bollywood is used variously to refer to the mainstream Indian film industry, to Bombay (now Mumbai) Hindi cinema, to Hindi cinema from the 1990s onward, and most recently to an Indian culture industry encompassing Hindi films and related commercial products distributed via satellite and cable TV, radio, DVD and video, CD and MP3, and Internet websites. Some Indian film producers and actors consider the term pejorative, in referencing a Hollywood clone, but it gained currency when Indian popular cinema began to attract international attention. The deregulation of India’s media industries in the 1990s encouraged Bollywood filmmakers to reach out to the large overseas Indian diasporic market....

Article

A waltz variation that first appeared in American ballrooms during the late 1860s. Each step to the dance was accompanied by a considerable bend of the knees, causing the entire body to sink down (the Boston “dip”).

See Waltz .

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15th- and 16th-century costumed dancers who performed the Moresca or Matachin. See also Querelle des Bouffons.

Rinaldo di Capua

Querelle des Bouffons

Article

Calinda  

Eugène Borrel

A dance, likely from Africa, that spread through Spanish America and the southern USA. The earliest known description dates from 1698, when Père Lavat (Nouveau voyage aux isles de l’Amérique, ii, 51), who called it the calenda, recorded having seen it danced, with a drum accompaniment, on Martinique. It was considered indecent by some Christian communities and subsequently forbidden, but was not wholly suppressed among the slaves....

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Caña  

Song and dance genre of Andalusian origin; see Cante hondo and Flamenco, §2.

Article

Theatre in Milan, inaugurated in 1779. In 1894 it was renamed the Teatro Lirico Internazionale, and later known as the Teatro Lirico.