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Fanfare  

Edward H. Tarr

(1) A flourish of trumpets or other brass instruments, often with percussion, for ceremonial purposes. Fanfares are distinct from military signals in usage and character. In addition to its musical meaning, ‘fanfare’ has always had a figurative meaning. The root, fanfa (‘vaunting’), goes back to late 15th-century Spanish. Although etymologists believe the word to be onomatopoeic, it may in fact be derived from the Arabic ...

Article

Hubert Unverricht and Janet K. Page

A term used for the fanfares, and later other compositions, also known as Feldstücke, ‘needed in the field at warlike happenings’ (Altenburg, 88); alternatively it applied to an ensemble that played such pieces. The term referred originally to the corps of military trumpeters which replaced the drum and fife bands widely used in the Middle Ages....

Article

Peter Downey

Signals intended to transmit information, commands or encouragement to an army during battle or in camp, to a navy during engagement or on voyage, and to royal and noble households at court and on tour, and also employed to embellish ceremonial occasions. Military calls are played on various musical instruments, including trumpets, bugles, flutes, drums and kettledrums, and are usually, but not exclusively, performed monophonically....

Article

A 17th-century term, like Tuck, tucket and toccata, for a fanfare or flourish of trumpets.