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Article

J. Richard Haefer

Conch horn of the Aztec or Nahua peoples of central Mexico, and other pre-Contact cultures. It was called puuaqua in Tarascan and paatáotocuècheni or paniçatàopáni in Zapotecan. The Aztecs called this the instrument of the ‘Wind God Quetzalcoatl; he who breathes life into a void’. It was usually played in pairs, and the shell was about 15 to 20 cm long....

Article

Halil  

Ancient Jewish reed instrument, analogous to the Greek aulos. See Jewish music, §I, 4(iii) .

Biblical instruments, §3(ii): Ḥalil

Article

Instrument mentioned in Daniel. See Biblical instruments, §3, (xiii) .

Article

Terry E. Miller

In Cambodia, the primary classical ensemble played at court ceremonies, some Buddhist festivals, to accompany the large shadow theatre, masked drama, and dance drama. Both the ensemble and its name are closely related to similar ensembles in Thailand (piphat) and Laos (sep nyai/piphat...

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Qarna  

Instrument mentioned in Daniel. See Biblical instruments, §3, (xiii).

Article

Ancient Jewish instrument. See Biblical instruments, §3, (ix).

Article

Alastair Dick

Sacred conch horn of India and South Asia. It is the equivalent of the sak of Sri Lanka and the dung of Tibet. The shell is that of the large gastropod Turbinella pyrum, found particularly in the waters of the south (Gulf of Mannar, northern Sri Lanka, Kerala) but also off Kathiawar, Gujarat. The Sanskrit name ...

Article

‘Ugav  

Ancient Jewish instrument, possibly a reed-pipe or form of organ. See Biblical instruments, §3, (xii).