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Gjama  

Bledar Kondi

Albanian funeral crying. Gjama represents the most powerful form of male funeral crying in Albanian tradition. Though the communist regime repressed the violent expression of tribal gjamë (1955–90) in the inaccessible mountains of northern Albania, it was revived again after the fall of the Iron Curtain. The term ...

Article

Bledar Kondi

Genre of epic songs in northern Albania and Kosovo sung to the accompaniment of the lahutë, a one-string bowed instrument. Kreshnik derives from Serbo-Croatian krajišnik, a ‘frontier warrior’ and it signifies a ‘noble hero’ in Albanian cultural context. These borderland songs are generally known as songs of Muji and Halil, both sons of a Turkish knight praised by Albanian mountain dwellers as heroes of resistance against south-Slavic expansion. Field recordings by M. Parry and A. Lord in Bosnia and Albania (...

Article

Bledar Kondi

Song genre. The term majekrahi refers to a vocal communication system and a traditional musical repertory in northern Albania, Kosovo, and the Albanophone highlands of Montenegro. It comprises antiphonic cries, homophonic songs, and instrumental pieces performed exclusively by men. According to the ‘Kanun of Lek Dukagjin’ [the self-administered, customary law of the mountains] a ‘clan herald has to cry out … from a specified site’. The herald cups his left ear with the left palm and then cups the open mouth ‘to pour out his voice’ (...

Article

Christopher Balme

The dances and music of the Polynesian peoples have had varying impact on the United States over the last one and half centuries. Of greatest importance are Hawaiian music and dance, including musical instruments such as the Pedal steel guitar and Ukulele, and practices such as the ...

Article

Shane K. Bernard

Musical genre combining New Orleans rhythm-and-blues, country-and-western, and Cajun and black Creole music. Invented in the mid-1950s by teenaged Cajuns and black Creoles, the sound hails from the 22 parish Acadiana region of south Louisiana, as well as a small portion of east Texas.

Most swamp pop pioneers were born during the period ...