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R. Allen Lott and Scott Alan Southard

(b Parma, Italy, Sept 1, 1860; d Chicago, IL, Dec 19, 1919). Italian conductor, opera manager, and violinist. After violin study in Parma, he began to conduct there in 1880. Campanini was assistant conductor with the Metropolitan Opera in its inaugural season (...

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Nicholas Tochka

(b Tirana, Albania, Dec 8, 1945). Albanian conductor and violinist. The son of vocalist Mihal Ciko and nephew of composer Nikolla Zoraqi, he was a leading member of the first generation of musicians to be trained by socialist-era Albania’s new music institutions. A virtuoso violinist, he graduated from the State Conservatory in ...

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Emmanuel Resche

(b Aurillac, June 18, 1784; d Tours, February 3, 1846). French conductor, composer, and violinist. He studied the violin with his uncle Jean Crémont in Limoges, and maybe with Baillot, pierre. He left France around 1800 and was presumably a student of Beethoven, as he wrote himself later. At the age of 19, he became the director, concertmaster, and conductor of the Imperial Theatre in Moscow. He left Russia in ...

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Stephen Montague and Kelly Hiser

(b Kankakee, IL, March 22, 1942; d San Rafael, CA, Sept 25, 1996). American composer, trombonist, conductor, and double bassist. He attended the University of Illinois, where he studied trombone with Robert Gray and composition with Kenneth Gaburo, herbert Brün , and salvatore Martirano ...

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Anne Dhu McLucas

(b ?England, 1770; d Philadelphia, PA, Sept 16, 1826). American violinist, conductor, music teacher, and composer. He was active in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New York from 1793 to 1826. He is said to have played at the Handel Commemoration in Westminster Abbey in ...

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Stephen D. Winick

(b New York, NY, July 13, 1965). American traditional Irish fiddler, banjo player, and bandleader. Eileen Ivers was raised in the Bronx by Irish parents. She took up the fiddle at age nine, taking lessons with Irish fiddler Martin Mulvihill. She began competing in the All-Ireland championships as a teen, and ultimately won 35 championships, including nine solo fiddle titles and a tenth on tenor banjo, making her the most successful American-born competitor in the All-Ireland’s history....

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Stanislav Tuksar

(b Milan, Italy, Jan 21, 1918; d Milan, May 1, 1989). Italian cellist, conductor, and pedagogue. He was trained at the Milan Conservatory (1928–34) and under Diran Alexanian and Pablo Casals at the École normale de musique in Paris (1934–7...

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Mark C. Gridley and Charles Garrett

(b Chicago, IL, March 11, 1932; d New York, NY, Feb 24, 2007). American jazz violinist, composer, and bandleader. He was influenced by the violinists Jascha Heifetz, Eddie South, and Bruce Hayden, as well as the saxophonists Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman, and John Coltrane. From ...

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Fatima Hadžić

(b Sarajevo, Bosnia, Dec 1, 1892; d Sarajevo, Oct 8, 1968). Bosnian conductor, cellist, music educator, and composer. He attended the private school of music known as Glasbena škola F. Matějovský in Sarajevo. He graduated in cello from the Royal Academy of Music in Zagreb in the class of Umberto Fabbri (...

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J. Bradford Robinson

(b Baltimore, MD, Dec 31, 1908; d Hollywood, CA, June 14, 1952). American jazz double bass player and bandleader. Originally a trombonist, he played tuba and double bass with Fletcher Henderson (1930–34, 1935–6) and Chick Webb (1934–5), attracting attention with his strong pulse and walking bass lines. In ...

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Robert Finn

(b Graz, Austria, Feb 24, 1884; d Honolulu, HI, Sept 20, 1957). American violinist and conductor. He studied violin with Otakar Ševčík at the Prague Conservatory and, after immigrating to the United States in the early 1900s, toured as a concert violinist and conductor, and served as director of a number of American and European music festivals. He headed the violin department at Yale University for 28 years. Having organized his own string quartet in Chicago (...

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Edward Komara

(b La Crosse, WI, July 25, 1906; d Oxford, MS, March 11, 1991). American composer, conductor, and violinist. He attended the University of Wisconsin (BS 1930, chemical engineering; BM 1938), the Royal Conservatory in Ghent, Belgium (diploma in violin, 1933), and Teachers College, Columbia University (MA ...

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Denis Hlynka

(b New York, NY, May 31, 1960). American conductor and violist. A graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music, he is known for extensive recordings on Naxos, Brilliant Classics, and Marco Polo. In 1992, Kuchar was appointed Principal Guest Conductor of the Ukrainian State Symphony Orchestra, and later Artistic Director and Principal Conductor of the renamed (...

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David Chevan

(b Irvington, NJ, April 3, 1936; d Geneva, NY, July 6, 1961). American jazz double bass player, composer, and bandleader. While growing up in Geneva, New York, he took up clarinet, after which he played tenor saxophone at high school. The music education program he attended at Ithaca College required that LaFaro learn a string instrument, and so at age 18 he began to focus on double bass. He subsequently played with the Buddy Morrow band from ...

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Daniele Buccio

(b Canton, OH, Aug 18, 1905; d West Redding, CT, July 31, 1978). American composer, violinist, bandleader, recording engineer, and producer. After graduating from Johns Hopkins University, he performed as a light classical violinist in the United States and Europe. During the 1930s he studied conducting with Maurice Frigara in Paris. After a near-fatal car accident in ...

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Gary Galván

(b Pittsburgh, PA, Nov 7, 1949). American conductor, educator, violinist, and violist. She began her musical studies in fourth grade on violin. She attended the University of Michigan (BMus 1971, MMus 1972) where she studied with conductor/violinist Elizabeth A.H. Green. Mabrey pursued coursework toward a DMA in orchestral conducting at the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati under the guidance of Theo Alcantara and ...

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Dick Spottswood

(b Weaverville, NC, July 20, 1898; d Concord, NC, June 12, 1971). American singer, fiddler, and bandleader. A breakdown fiddler who played in an early country style similar to that of Fiddlin’ John Carson, J.E. and his younger brother Wade formed Mainers’ Mountaineers while both were full-time employees at a cotton mill in Concord, North Carolina. They performed informally until they appeared with the Lay Brothers on WSOC in nearby Gastonia. In ...

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Dick Spottswood

(b Buncombe County, NC, April 21, 1907; d Flint, MI, Sept 12, 2011). American singer, banjo player, guitarist, and bandleader. Formed Mainers’ Mountaineers with his brother J.E. from 1934–36 and thereafter with his own Sons of the Mountaineers, Mainer furthered the growth and development of mountain string band music in the 1930s. In an era that saw the rising popularity of western swing, honky-tonk, and Hollywood cowboy songs, the Mainers successfully recycled traditional tunes and kept the sound of rural fiddle and banjo prominent on Southeastern radio, in small performance venues, and on more than 150 recordings made for RCA between ...

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Gregory N. Reish

(b Sneedville, TN, Aug 10, 1927; d Nashville, TN, May 14, 2005). American bluegrass and country singer, guitarist, and bandleader. Known as the “King of Bluegrass,” Martin began his career as guitarist and lead singer of bill Monroe ’s Blue Grass Boys from late ...

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Stanislav Tuksar

(b Zagreb, Croatia, Sept 19, 1901; d Zagreb, March 22, 1988). Croatian composer, cellist, conductor, and music pedagogue. He studied composition with Blagoje Bersa in 1926 at the Zagreb Academy of Music, and studied cello with Umberto Fabbri, Jure Tkalčić, and Vaclav Huml. He founded and led Glazbeno društvo intelektualaca (GDI, ‘The Musical Society of Intellectuals’, ...