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Article

Owen Wright

(b Maragh; d Herat, 1435). Timurid composer, performer and theorist. He first rose to prominence in the service of the Jalā’irid rulers of Iraq and Azerbaijan, al-Ḥusayn (1374–82) and Aḥmad (1382–1410). After the conquest of Baghdad by Tīmūr (...

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Roger Bowers

(b c1420; d 1497). English church musician. He was noted as a fine singer and skilful organist. After service in the household of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (until 1447), and as a lay clerk of Eton College (1447–51), where he was one of the four clerks specially responsible for singing polyphony in the college chapel, he became a clerk of the Chapel Royal in ...

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Emilio Ros-Fábregas

(b Ecija, province of Seville, c1460; d after 1524). Spanish poet, vihuelist and composer. He was one of the leading Castilian poets of the generation of Juan del Encina; one of his poems received a response by Pedro de Cartagena, who died in ...

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Michel Renault

(b in or near Le Mans, c1525–30; d after 1584). French lutenist and composer. According to La Croix du Maine (Les bibliothèques françoises de La Croix du Maine et de Du Verdier, Paris, 1772–3/R, ii, 11) he was working in Maine in ...

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Franz Krautwurst and Beth Bullard

(b c1475; d between 1520 and 1532). German lutenist and composer. From September 1503 at the latest (probably earlier) he was court lutenist to Maximilian I; in this capacity he was in Augsburg in 1509 and 1518. He was made a citizen of Nuremberg on ...

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Daniel Heartz

(fl Paris, 1st half of the 16th century). French lutenist. He was a singer at the Ste Chapelle in 1506, and in 1532 was paid as a music copyist for the royal chapel. Attaingnant printed a Pavane Blondeau and several pieces for lute in the same style signed ‘P.B.’ in ...

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Arthur J. Ness

(b Brescia, 1474; d ?Brescia, after 1548). Italian nobleman, lutenist and composer. He lived in Brescia in 1489, 1498 and again in 1548, and Gombosi surmised that he may have been the phenomenal Brescian lutenist who visited the court of Henry VIII in ...

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William F. Prizer

(b Verona, c1465; d Mantua, 1525). Italian composer, singer and lutenist. With Bartolomeo Tromboncino he was one of the two most important composers of frottolas in the early 16th century. During his career he was the central figure in music at the Mantuan court, establishing the way for such composers as Jacquet of Mantua, Giaches de Wert and, eventually, Claudio Monteverdi....

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Arthur J. Ness

(b c1480; d after 1538). Italian lutenist and composer. In 1505 the Venetian Signory granted him a ten-year privilege to publish lute tablatures in competition with Petrucci. Although no publications issued under this licence are known, the main source of Dall’Aquila’s works (...

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Joan Wess and Victor Anand Coelho

(b ?Milan; fl 1508). Italian lutenist and composer. He was the composer and arranger of Petrucci’s Intabolatura de lauto libro quarto (Venice, 1508), in the preface of which he is called ‘milanese’. Dalza's book was the fourth of Petrucci's series of lute tablatures and is one of the precious few surviving sources of Italian lute music from the crucial period leading up to the first printed works by Francesco da Milano in ...

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Howard Mayer Brown and David Fallows

(b before c1429; d after 1472). French playwright and musician. By 17 July 1450, when he is mentioned as organist at the Cathedral of Notre Dame, Paris, he was already designated magister; on 19 October of that year he also became magister cantus puerorum...

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John Griffiths

(b ?Granada; d nr Naples, May 1, 1528). Spanish vihuelist and composer. Apparently a native of Granada, he perished while observing the naval battle of the Gulf of Salerno aboard the Spanish commander’s vessel. Praised as one of the most talented vihuelists of his time, Guzmán was one of the earliest exponents of the seven-course vihuela. No works survive, although his tablatures were collected for publication by Luys de Narváez in the 1530s and were still in circulation when Bermudo wrote of him in ...

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Wolfgang Boetticher

(b Schwäbisch Gmünd, c1445–50; d Vienna, early March 1526). German lutenist, composer and probably lute maker. His family came from Württemberg; his father may have been one Hartmann Judenkünig. He is first recorded in 1518 as a lutenist in the Corpus Christi confraternity at the Stephansdom in Vienna; he had probably already been working as a musician there for some time, and he lived in the oldest quarter of Vienna in a house called the ‘Gundlachhaus’, later celebrated under the name of ‘Köllnerhof’ as a centre for musicians and merchants. Although he was not a member of the nobility, his prominent position as a citizen is indicated by a coat of arms depicting a string player, which appeared in both his books; both books also include a full-page woodcut showing a bearded lutenist (probably Judenkünig himself), together with a pupil playing a large viol. Judenkünig was in contact with the learned humanistic community of Vienna: he arranged some of the odes of Petrus Tritonius, and he seems also to have been familiar with the ideals of the poetic-mathematical circle around Conrad Celtis. His date of death at an advanced age was recorded in the margin of one copy of his ...

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John M. Ward

( fl 1507–39). Italian organist. According to his contemporary, Marino Sanuto, he was a Crutched friar . He was a pupil of Paul Hofhaimer and became first organist of S Marco, Venice, from 1507 to 1516. With the doge's permission, he left Venice for London in ...

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William F. Prizer

(b Verona, c1470; d, May 1528). Italian priest, composer, singer and lutenist. With Tromboncino and Cara, he was one of the most important frottola composers. He was born in Verona in about 1470, the son of Alberto and Umilia Pesenti. Since he was a priest, he must have studied at the Scuola degli Accoliti in his native city, an institution founded by Pope Eugene IV that produced other cleric-composers, among them Marchetto Cara. Pesenti’s first known position was in Ferrara, where he served Cardinal Ippolito I d’Este, acting as a procurer of music and instruments as well as a lutenist, singer and composer. Already in ...

Article

(b Ferrara, ?1417; d Ferrara, Sept 20, 1497). Italian lutenist and singer , one of the most important musicians in Italy in the 15th century. He spent most of his career at the Este court in Ferrara, with periods of service at Milan, Naples, Mantua and the Hungarian court. He is first documented in ...

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Anne Beetem Acker

(b Vienna, Austria, 1370; d Nuremberg, Germany, 1401). Viennese physician, medical astrologer, organist, and presumed harpsichord maker. The earliest dated reference to what might be a harpsichord is in a letter from Padua of 1397 that names Hermann Poll as its inventor. Poll earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Vienna between ...

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Maricarmen Gómez

(b ?Seville, before 1400; d after 1457). Spanish instrumentalist . He was among the most famous musicians who served the Trastámara family, and formed part of the entourage which Fernando I of Castile took with him when he took possession of the Aragonese throne in ...

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Hans Radke

(b ?Padua, c1495; d Padua, 1549). Italian lutenist. Canon Scardeonius of Padua wrote in 1560 that Rotta was not only virtually unrivalled in Italy as a lutenist, but was also an excellent teacher and had grown quite rich by giving lessons on the lute. Scardeonius also mentioned that Rotta had published ‘praecepta notabilia’ for playing the lute, presumably meaning the appendix to Rotta’s ...

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Lyle Nordstrom

(b Fossombrone, fl 1507). Italian lutenist and composer. A dedicatory poem by Cristoforo Pierio Gigante in Spinacino’s Libro primo describes him as an emulator of Orpheus, and Philippo Oriolo da Bassano’s poem Monte Parnaso (c1520) includes Spinacino in a list of eminent late 15th-century lutenists. His two publications, ...