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H. Wiley Hitchcock and Nicholas Temperley

(b Swanton Morley, Norfolk, bap. Jan 15, 1571; d Amsterdam, ?1622–3). English minister and psalmodist. He attended Cambridge University from 1586 to 1591, leaving without a degree. He was expatriated as a ‘Brownist’ in 1593 and settled in Amsterdam, where he became ‘teacher’ of the Ancient Separatist Church in ...

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Renee Lapp Norris

(b Northborough, MA, Sept 5, 1830; d Madison, WI, Dec 9, 1889). American classical scholar, teacher, editor, and writer. Allen is best known musically as an editor of Slave Songs of the United States (New York, 1867), also edited by Charles Pickard Ware and Lucy McKim Garrison, who were white collectors of black music....

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Carolyn Gianturco and Teresa M. Gialdroni

(b Mosso Santa Maria, nr Biella, Jan 31, 1921). Italian musicologist. He took diplomas in piano at the Parma Conservatory (1942) and in choral music at the Turin Conservatory (1948), and studied music history with Della Corte at Turin University, where he took an arts degree (...

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(b Comber, Co. Down, Aug 10, 1904; d Oxford, Oct 10, 1965). Northern Irish music scholar, teacher, organist, composer and editor. He went to Bedford School, and studied at the RCM in London, Trinity College, Dublin, and New College, Oxford, gaining doctorates of music at both universities. In ...

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H. Wiley Hitchcock

(b New York, June 3, 1851; d Dresden, Oct 13, 1934). American music scholar and lexicographer. Trained as a young man for a business career, he decided rather on music. For a time he was an organist in Concord, Massachusetts. He went to Germany to study in ...

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Vilena Vrbanić

(b Zagreb, May 13, 1956). Croatian-American musicologist and editor. He studied musicology at the Zagreb Music Academy (BA 1980; MA 1983) and received the PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (1997) with a dissertation on music in medieval and renaissance astrological imagery. He was a researcher at the institutes of musicology of the Zagreb Music Academy (...

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Jon Newsom

(b New York, Dec 1, 1905; d New York, Dec 16, 1967). American editor and musicologist. He attended City College, New York, and studied music privately, but as a music scholar he was largely self-educated. His career in editing and music publishing began with his appointment as associate editor of the ...

Article

Yolande de Brossard

(b Dompierre, bap. Sept 12, 1655; d Meaux, Aug 10, 1730). French priest, theorist, composer, lexicographer and bibliophile. He was descended from a family founded by Antoine de Brossard (b c1286), a natural son of Charles de Valois (son of Philip the Bold) and Hélène Broschart, daughter of the king's treasurer. Sébastien was the last of a family of glass-blowers from lower Normandy. He studied at the Jesuit college in Caen and then attended that city's famous university, studying philosophy for two years and theology for three. When he turned to music, therefore, he was self-taught; he studied the lute, copying and composing pieces for the instrument. He took minor orders in ...

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Ellen T. Harris

(b Los Angeles, April 13, 1930; d Venice, Feb 20, 1993). American musicologist and editor. He took the BA at Harvard College in 1951, then studied singing and conducting privately in Vienna. He returned to Harvard in 1953 for graduate studies with Piston, Gombosi, Merritt and John Ward and received the MA in ...

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Richard Griscom

(b Lorain, OH, Mar 22, 1954). American music librarian, theorist, and editor. She received her undergraduate degree in music theory from Ohio University (BM 1976). While completing studies in music theory at Northwestern University (PhD 1985), she joined the staff of the Northwestern University Music Library (...

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Paula Morgan

(b Eşfahān, Oct 11, 1908; d Francestown, NH, Sept 5, 1992). American musicologist and editor of Armenian origin. After taking a diploma at the American College in Tehran in 1927, he studied the violin and composition in Paris and New York, and became a composition student of Malipiero. He studied musicology at Harvard, where he took the MA in ...

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Michael Fend

(b Florence, 8/Sept 14, 1760; d Paris, March 15, 1842). Italian, composer, conductor, teacher, administrator, theorist, and music publisher, active in France. He took French citizenship, probably in 1794, and was a dominant figure in Parisian musical life for half a century. He was a successful opera composer during the Revolutionary period, and had comparable success with religious music from the beginning of the Restoration. He was made director of the Paris Conservatoire and consolidated its pre-eminent position in music education in Europe....

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Argia Bertini and Giulia Anna Romana Veneziano

(b Florence, July 8, 1638; d Florence, Jan 16, 1703). Italian composer, teacher, music editor, theorist, organist and singer. He spent his entire life as a priest in Florence. On 1 August 1663 he was appointed chaplain at the cathedral, S Maria del Fiore, where he was also active as an organist and singer. He was particularly admired as a teacher, and it was this above all that determined the nature of his publications; the numerous reprints particularly of ...

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Christopher Fifield

(b Cologne, Jan 23, 1813; d Berlin, Aug 17, 1887). German music historian, editor, organist and composer. He was a pupil of Joseph Klein and Carl Leibl and in 1828 became organist of the Carmelite church at Cologne and a member of the cathedral choir. In ...

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Tiberiu Alexandru and Ruxandra Arzoiu

(b Timişoara, Romania, March 30, 1923). Romanian musicologist and lexicographer. He produced the first dictionaries of Romanian musicians, Muzicieni din România, in ten volumes (Bucharest, 1989–2011). He studied at the Timişoara Municipal Conservatory (1929–32) and the Bucharest Conservatory (1945–50...

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(b Rabestenne, Hautes-Pyrénées, 1525; d Geneva, Aug 31, 1561). French philologist and printer. He practised as a doctor and was known as a humanist. In 1554 he collaborated with Matthieu Bonhomme at Lyons, editing texts by Clenardo, Hippocrates and Terence. He settled at Geneva early in ...

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(b Amiens, Dec 18, 1610; d Paris, Oct 23, 1688). French historian, philologist and lexicographer. He was one of a celebrated group of learned 17th-century French scholars who founded modern historical and linguistic criticism. He was a student of law in Orléans and practised at the parliament in Paris from ...

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Alec Hyatt King

(b Breslau [now Wrocław], Oct 22, 1832; d Templin, Feb 2, 1905). German editor and bibliographer. Self-taught in music, Eitner established himself at Berlin in 1853 as a music teacher and also became known as a composer. In 1863 he founded a practical music school, but soon became interested in historical research and in ...

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Edith Gerson-Kiwi and Bret Werb

(b Berdyansk, Crimea, 4/April 16, 1868; d Tel-Aviv, Feb 11, 1927). Russian composer, critic, lexicographer and folklorist. He studied law at Kharkov University but soon turned to music, studying theory and composition with Taneyev and Ippolitov-Ivanov at the Moscow Conservatory (...

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Watkins Shaw

(b Paddington, London, Nov 11, 1870; d Windsor, Dec 21, 1951). English editor, scholar and cathedral musician. He showed marked musical gifts at an early age and when he was only seven Joachim offered to take him as a pupil. However, he received a conventional education at Winchester College and Oriel College, Oxford. At Oxford he read theology though he found time to develop his musical interests and remained for a fourth year working towards a music degree. On leaving Oxford he studied for the church and was ordained in ...