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José López-Calo

(b Córdoba, 1488; d Seville, Sept 12, 1539). Spanish bibliophile and music collector. The illegitimate son of Christopher Columbus, he received a thorough education at the court of the Catholic Monarchs. From his earliest years he had a great passion for travel and accompanied his father on a journey to America. Later he made several extensive journeys through Europe, at first with Charles V and later on his own account. He took advantage of his journeys to acquire the best books he could find on many subjects, including music. He kept an exact account of all his acquisitions, with details of the most important ones; in each volume he noted the place and date of purchase and the price. He also compiled careful lists of his library. By the end of his life he had an extremely important library of more than 15,000 items, including numerous manuscripts; on his death he left the whole collection to Seville Cathedral. Regrettably, nearly three-quarters of the books have been lost; only some 4000 volumes remain. Among them, nevertheless, there are some very valuable items, ranging from medieval manuscripts to unique prints of Petrucci and theoretical works. His catalogues also largely survive and provide details of early printed music which has since been lost. In ...

Article

Franz Krautwurst

(b Ansbach, 1493; d Heilsbronn, Oct 15, 1554). German music collector and composer. He studied at the University of Leipzig from 1511, and in 1514 took the bachelor's degree. Even before he matriculated he seems to have known the university deacon Nikolas Apel, whose love of music may have stimulated Hartung's interest in collecting musical works. He was one of Luther's early adherents and from ...

Article

(b Augsburg, 1520; d Augsburg, July 28, 1583). German collector of music. He came from one of the oldest patrician families of Augsburg, where his father Georg was mayor. As a judge and a member of the higher and lower councils he was one of the most influential men in Augsburg public life. Through large-scale commercial and banking businesses, partly in collaboration with the house of Habsburg and with Anton Fugger, he and his brother Johann Paul amassed a considerable fortune. In ...

Article

Walter Blankenburg

(b Schneeberg, Saxony, April 4, 1515; d Königsberg, Nov 27, 1585). German jurist and humanist. He was one of the children of a Saxon mine inspector. In 1527 he went to school and later to university in Leipzig; in 1535 he took the Master of Arts degree and remained as a teacher at the university until ...

Article

Philip Brett

(b? Norwich, ?1550; d Norfolk, 1630). English music collector and amateur musician . He was the second son of Sir Thomas Paston and the head of a junior branch of the Norfolk family that wrote the ‘Paston’ letters. A Roman Catholic country gentleman who, in the words of his epitaph in Blofield church, was ‘most skillfull of liberall Sciences especially musicke and Poetry as also strange languages’, he played the lute, translated Spanish poetry, and probably wrote the English verses set to Italian madrigals in some manuscripts of his collection (e.g. ...

Article

(d Zürich, 1587 ). Swiss burgomaster and musician. He is listed as a citizen of Zürich in 1558, a guild master (Zunftmeister) of Meisen between 1574 and 1583, a head governor (Obervogt) to the villages of Wettswil and Bonstetten during the period ...

Article

(b Glarus, Feb 5, 1505; d Glarus, Feb 28, 1572). Swiss statesman, historian and collector of music. From his studies with Zwingli and with Glarean in Basle (1516–17) he developed a special enthusiasm for music. With Glarean’s help he studied the theorist's system of 12 modes and analysed a large repertory of the period ...

Article

Kenneth Elliott

(fl 1560–92). Scottish clergyman . He compiled an important set of partbooks, sometimes known as the St Andrews Psalter or ‘Thomas Wode’s Partbooks’, containing Scottish (and other) music of the 16th century. A canon of Lindores Abbey before the Reformation (1560), Wood joined the reformers, settled in St Andrews in ...