1-20 of 175 results  for:

  • 17th c./Early to mid-Baroque (1600-1700) x
Clear all

Article

Karol Berger

(b Genoa, c1600; d after 1640). Italian theorist. A Franciscan, he was chaplain and musician to Cardinal Franz von Dietrichstein, Prince-Bishop of Olomouc and governor of Moravia. Before 1629 he probably taught music at the seminary at St Oslowan and from 1629...

Article

Colleen Reardon

(b c1580; d Siena, Jan 1642). Italian composer and theorist.

Agazzari’s parents were evidently of Sienese origin, and he himself settled in Siena as a boy and received his training there, perhaps from Francesco Bianciardi. He was organist at Siena Cathedral from ...

Article

Karl-Ernst Bergunder and Peter Wollny

(b Grossfurra, Thuringia, Oct 25, 1643; d Gotha, Feb 20, 1676). German composer and writer. After initially going to school in his native town he was sent in 1656 to Eisenach for three years. There he attended the town school, the staff of which included Theodor Schuchardt, a highly respected teacher of music and Latin. From ...

Article

George J. Buelow

(b Mühlhausen, bap. June 12, 1651; d Mühlhausen, Dec 2, 1706). German composer, theorist, organist and poet, son of Johann Rudolf Ahle. He no doubt received his musical education from his father, whom he succeeded at the age of 23 as organist of St Blasius, Mühlhausen. Like his father he held the post until his death, and he was succeeded by the young Bach. Again like his father, he was elected to the town council. He was described on the title-page of his ...

Article

H. Wiley Hitchcock and Nicholas Temperley

(b Swanton Morley, Norfolk, bap. Jan 15, 1571; d Amsterdam, ?1622–3). English minister and psalmodist. He attended Cambridge University from 1586 to 1591, leaving without a degree. He was expatriated as a ‘Brownist’ in 1593 and settled in Amsterdam, where he became ‘teacher’ of the Ancient Separatist Church in ...

Article

Monique Escudier

(b Krempe, Jan 27, 1602; d Brunsbüttel, May 29, 1672). German theologian, historian, poet and music theorist. After studying in Krempe and Hamburg he completed his studies at Leipzig University in 1624 and in the same year became Poet Laureate. Meanwhile in 1621...

Article

Ennio Stipčević

(b Split, 1603; d after 1619). Croatian theorist. He was a descendant of the Alberti-Matulić family, and his father Matija was an eminent Croatian writer. He studied music for a short time in Venice with Romano Michaeli and Martio Valinea, who, according to the title-page of Alberti's treatise, was ‘gentilhuomo d'Urbino, musico straordinario in San Marco’. Alberti was only 15 years old when he wrote his treatise, the ...

Article

Robert Shay

(b Westminster, London, Jan 1648; d Oxford, Dec 14, 1710). English scholar, composer and music collector. He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford (after early training in mathematics at Westminster School), in 1662, receiving the BA, MA and DD degrees in 1666, 1669 and ...

Article

(b Chios, 1588; d Rome, Jan 19, 1669). Italian theologian and scholar of Greek origin. He went to Italy as a child and studied philosophy, theology, and classics in Rome at the Greek Catholic Collegio di S Atanasio from 1599 to 1610. After a period in Chios he studied medicine in Rome until ...

Article

Ingo Schultz and Howard Hotson

(b Ballersbach, nr Herborn, March 1588; d Gyulafehérvár [Weissenburg, Transylvania; [now Alba Julia, Romania], Nov 9, 1638). German theologian, encyclopedist and music theorist. From 1608 he taught at the Calvinist academy, Herborn, where J.A. Komenský was among his pupils. Following the disruptions of the Thirty Years War, he transferred to Gyulafehérvár in Transylvania in ...

Article

Craig H. Russell and Monica Hall

(b Monistrol de Montserrat, c1572; d Monistrol de Montserrat, Feb 10, 1642). Catalan theorist, guitarist and physician. Biographical information about Amat is drawn mainly from research carried out in 1918 by José Vilar (Revista Ilustrada Jorba, 1925, and Pujol, 1950). Although baptismal records are missing, Vilar placed Amat’s birth at around ...

Article

Lini Hübsch-Pfleger

(b Mansfeld, probably before 1570; d Buchenbach, nr Freiburg, before Oct 1636). German theologian and writer. The first two names of his pseudonym are equivalents of Wolfhart Spangenberg, his original name, and Andropediacus derives from the name of his birthplace. He was the son of Cyriac and grandson of Johann Spangenberg. His father having been obliged to leave his position as court preacher at Mansfeld in ...

Article

Josef-Horst Lederer

(b Cremona; d 1630). Italian theorist. He was a Franciscan tertiary and studied composition with Claudio Merulo. According to Lucchini, he was maestro di cappella at the Florentine court in 1622, but this cannot have been so, as Marco da Gagliano held the post at that time. In his treatise ...

Article

(b Seville; fl 1628–33). Spanish writer. He was a member of the Trinitarian order in Seville. Between 1628 and 1633 he wrote several pseudo-historical works on local and religious topics as well as one pertaining to music: El psalterio de David: exortación, y virtudes de la música, y canto, para todo género de gentes, en particular para los eclesiásticos, y obligación que tienen de cantar, o rezar las divinas alabanzas con toda atención, y devoción...

Article

Eleanor Selfridge-Field

(b Rimini, c1600; d Rimini, c1678). Italian composer and author. He was a priest and maestro di cappella of Rimini Cathedral. From 1649 he was librarian of the Biblioteca Gambalunghiana, Rimini. He wrote literary and historical works; all his music dates from his early years. He had some connection with the pseudonymous composer Accademico Bizzarro Capriccioso, to each of whose opp.1 and 2 (...

Article

Josef-Horst Lederer

(fl 1657). Italian theorist and ?composer. His treatise Regole di musica, divise in cinque trattati (Rome, 1657) indicates that in 1657 he was Predicatore in the Minori Osservanti – an order of strict Franciscans – in the province of Terra Lavoro. In some reference works he is mentioned as a composer of lute music, but there are no known compositions. The ...

Article

(b Copenhagen, Sept 10, 1655; d ?Copenhagen, June 11, 1738). Danish anatomist, doctor of medicine, and polymath. Scion of a famous family of doctors and natural philosophers, he began medical studies with his father in 1671 and three years later was appointed professor of philosophy by King Christian IV. He then travelled for several years, and working in Paris with the anatomist Joseph Guichard Duverney, he first described ‘Bartholin’s glands’ in a cow. Returning to Copenhagen, he took up medical practice and taught medicine and anatomy. In ...

Article

(b Ferrara, Feb 12, 1608; d Rome, Jan 13, 1685). Italian scholar. He was a Jesuit and spent much of his later life in Rome (for a summary of his life and works see DBI). One of his publications is an extensive work on acoustics, ...

Article

Cecil Adkins

(b Meissen, nr Dresden; fl 1614). German theorist. He was a teacher at Beuten. His Musica mathematica was published at Altenburg in 1614 as the second part (pp.89–175) of Heinrich Zeising's Theatri machinarum. Bartolus's treatise is basically speculative in nature. He relied heavily on the horoscope in his interpretation of the effects of music, suggesting that the composer's choice of tonalities, as well as their effect on the listener, could be determined astrologically. Although the monochord tuning which he propounded had been devised by Andreas Reinhard in his ...

Article

George J. Buelow

(b Wernigerode, Harz, Sept 17, 1581; d Quedlinburg, Saxe-Anhalt, Jan 13, 1655). German theorist and composer. Jacobs established that his German family name was Pipegrop, not Grobstimme as stated in some earlier biographical accounts. He attended the Lateinschule at Wernigerode, where he probably first studied music with the Kantor Johann Krüger as well as with the organist of the Oberpfarrkirche, Paul Becker. He entered the university at Helmstedt in ...