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Article

Bonnie J. Blackburn

(b Florence, c1480; d after 1545). Italian theorist and composer. Nothing is known of Aaron's early training, his teacher, or his career before 1516. He claims to have had ‘the greatest friendship and familiarity’ with Josquin, Obrecht, Isaac and Agricola in Florence (most likely between ...

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Owen Wright

(b Maragh; d Herat, 1435). Timurid composer, performer and theorist. He first rose to prominence in the service of the Jalā’irid rulers of Iraq and Azerbaijan, al-Ḥusayn (1374–82) and Aḥmad (1382–1410). After the conquest of Baghdad by Tīmūr (...

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Roger Bowers

(b c1420; d 1497). English church musician. He was noted as a fine singer and skilful organist. After service in the household of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (until 1447), and as a lay clerk of Eton College (1447–51), where he was one of the four clerks specially responsible for singing polyphony in the college chapel, he became a clerk of the Chapel Royal in ...

Article

Acourt  

David Fallows

( fl c 1420). Composer . His three-voice rondeau Je demande ma bienvenue survives only in the manuscript GB-Ob Can.misc.213 (facs., Chicago, 1995; ed. in CMM, xi/2, 1959). Its extreme simplicity and economy of gesture suggest that the composer is not identifiable with Johannes Haucourt...

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Adam  

Tom R. Ward and David Fallows

(fl 1420–30). Composer, possibly French. His three rondeaux, Au temps vendra, Au grief hermitage and Tout a caup, were copied into the manuscript GB-Ob Can.misc.213 soon after 1430 (all ed. in CMM, xi/2, 1959). He could be identifiable with Adam Fabri, clerc de matines...

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Patrick Macey, Jeremy Noble, Jeffrey Dean and Gustave Reese

In 

See Josquin (Lebloitte dit) des Prez

Article

Herbert Kellman

(b Nuremberg, c1470; d Mechelen, June 26, 1536). South Netherlandish music scribe of German birth. He was a member of the Nuremberg merchant family Imhof, but settled in the Netherlands in the early 1490s. He was active principally at the courts of Margaret of Austria, regent of the Netherlands, her successor Mary of Hungary and Emperor Charles V, in Mechelen and Brussels. He was one of several copyists – the others are anonymous – of a complex of more than 60 manuscripts of polyphonic music produced there between about ...

Article

(fl late 15th century or early 16th). Spanish composer. A number of sacred works and at least one song are attributed to this composer in Iberian sources; one work, a four-voice Agnus Dei, bears the ascription ‘Alonso Perez de Alba’. There are two possible candidates who may be identified with this composer....

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Gianluca D’Agostino

(b Florence, c1358; d Bologna, 1415). Italian poet. The son of the wealthy merchant Nicolaio (d 1377), he inherited his father’s business and properties, including the famous country villa ‘Il Paradiso’. He took an active part in the Florentine government. In ...

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Isabel Pope and Tess Knighton

(fl1482). Iberian composer. He was a singer in the Aragonese royal chapel of Ferdinand V over a period of almost 30 years, from 1482 until 1510. He was presented to various ecclesiastical benefices under royal patronage and held, presumably by proxy, the position of head chaplain of the Dominican monastery in Madrid until ...

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Alonso  

(fl 1500). Spanish composer. He may be identifiable with Alonso de Plaja.

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William F. Prizer

(b ?Venice, c1460; d Venice, late 1502, or before Feb 6, 1503). Italian composer and organist. He was appointed the first player of the second new organ at S Marco, Venice, in 1490, having previously been organist at S Leonardo there. He held the position at S Marco until shortly before ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b ?Urrestilla, nr Azpeitia, 1462; d Azpeitia, July 30, 1523). Spanish composer. He was the second son of Martín García de Anchieta and Urtayzaga de Loyola (an aunt of Ignatius Loyola) and may have studied at Salamanca University, where the music professor from ...

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William F. Prizer

(b c1470; d 1524). Sienese composer, singer and priest. Ansanus can now be identified as Sano di Goro, the son of a Sienese wool shearer, who is first recorded as a clerk in the cathedral of Siena in March 1484. He joined the chapel as a chorister in ...

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William F. Prizer

(b ?Padua; fl 1505–14). Italian composer. He is probably identifiable with the ‘Honophrius Patavinus’ of Petrucci’s sixth and eleventh books of frottolas. His frottolas consist of nine barzellette, two ode, a ballata and a strambotto, the last, Se un pone un fragil vetro...

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(fl c1440–70). ?Italian composer. Previously thought to have been English, he is now presumed to have been a native of the Trentino, perhaps identifiable with the nobleman and lawyer Christophorus Anthonii de Molveno, traceable in Trent in 1449–68. His works, comprising a Sanctus, ...

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Albert Seay and David Fallows

(fl1400–32). Italian composer. The only secure facts of his life are that he was ‘magister cantus’ at S Marco, Venice, on 3 March 1420 and was listed in a notarial act of 20 July 1425 as a ‘cantor S Marci’. The text of his motet, ...

Article

(b c1480–88; d after 1558). South Netherlandish composer and singer. The earliest known archival documents mention him in 1518 as a singer and in 1519 as the choirmaster at St Jacob in Bruges. After 1519, contemporary publications by Attaingnant and Moderne are the only source of evidence of his activity until ...

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Clement A. Miller

(b Aachen, c 1492). South Netherlandish composer. He came from the diocese of Liège and studied music under Thomas Tzamen of Aachen. On 23 November 1510 he entered the University of Cologne where he met Heinrich Glarean, who later published Aquanus’s humanistic motet, ...

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(b end of the 15th century; d Speyer, July 1534). German organist and composer. There is no evidence to support Jauernig’s assumption that he was the Balthasar Pistorius from Besike who matriculated at Heidelberg University on 12 April 1498. Arthopius was organist in Weissenburg (now Wissembourg), Alsace, around ...