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Article

Lini Hübsch-Pfleger

(b Mansfeld, probably before 1570; d Buchenbach, nr Freiburg, before Oct 1636). German theologian and writer. The first two names of his pseudonym are equivalents of Wolfhart Spangenberg, his original name, and Andropediacus derives from the name of his birthplace. He was the son of Cyriac and grandson of Johann Spangenberg. His father having been obliged to leave his position as court preacher at Mansfeld in ...

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(b Seville; fl 1628–33). Spanish writer. He was a member of the Trinitarian order in Seville. Between 1628 and 1633 he wrote several pseudo-historical works on local and religious topics as well as one pertaining to music: El psalterio de David: exortación, y virtudes de la música, y canto, para todo género de gentes, en particular para los eclesiásticos, y obligación que tienen de cantar, o rezar las divinas alabanzas con toda atención, y devoción...

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Jérôme de La Gorce

(b Orléans, c1670; d Paris, 1745). French dramatist. After writing four tragedies for the Thé âtre Français, she is thought to have collaborated with the Abbé Pellegrin, who gave her advice, on several librettos: Les fêtes de l’été (1716), set by Montéclair, and ...

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(b Copenhagen, Sept 10, 1655; d ?Copenhagen, June 11, 1738). Danish anatomist, doctor of medicine, and polymath. Scion of a famous family of doctors and natural philosophers, he began medical studies with his father in 1671 and three years later was appointed professor of philosophy by King Christian IV. He then travelled for several years, and working in Paris with the anatomist Joseph Guichard Duverney, he first described ‘Bartholin’s glands’ in a cow. Returning to Copenhagen, he took up medical practice and taught medicine and anatomy. In ...

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(b Novellara, nr Reggio nell'Emilia, 5 Feb or Nov 1582; d Ancona, March 9, 1659). Italian dramatist. He spent his first years in Novellara with his relative Camillo Gonzaga. He was trained at the court of Ferrara and Modena where he lived with his brother Guidobaldo (a writer of tragedies) and then at the Collegio Borromeo in Pavia. Despite an offer of service with the Este family he established himself in Ancona (...

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Albert Cohen

(b Pont-de-Vaux, Ain, April 24, 1633; d Paris, May 4, 1691). French lawyer and man of letters. He is often confused with his great-grandson, Charles-Emmanuel Borjon de Scellery (c1715–95). He was active in the law courts of both Dijon and Paris and is known chiefly for his writings on jurisprudence. He also composed poetry (noëls ‘en patois bressan’), published after his death and later set to music, and is credited with ...

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Alison Stonehouse

(b Albi, 1618; d Paris, July 22, 1688). French dramatist . Over a period of 50 years he wrote 23 plays, 14 of them tragedies, the rest machine-plays and comedies. He wrote the libretto for one opera, Méduse (C. H. Gervais, 1697); mainly in alexandrine verse, its plot revolves around Medusa’s love for Perseus and her jealous reaction to his love for Ismene. Boyer viewed ...

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Almonte Howell

(fl 1689–1702). Spanish theologian. A Jesuit priest, he taught theology at the royal college of his order in Salamanca and was the author of several works on moral and theological questions. His Discurso theológico sobre los theatros y comedias de este siglo (Salamanca, ...

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Andrew Ashbee

(b Wotton, Surrey, Oct 31, 1620; d London, Feb 27, 1706). English amateur musician and diarist. As a musician, he admitted ‘to some formal knowledge, though to small perfection of hand’. He began the study of music at Oxford in 1639, and though mention of the art obtrudes less in his diary than in that of Pepys, his objective reporting affords an invaluable insight into 17th-century musical life. His long continental journey (...

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Agostino Ziino

(b late 16th century; d before 1647). Italian humanist and writer on music. In 1640, under the pseudonym of Giorgio Mazzaferro, he wrote a Discorso sopra la musica antica, e moderna (in I-Rli ). In the wake of the Florentine Camerata he here proclaimed the superiority of ancient music, in which poetry and music were one, over modern music, where such unity had been lost: in the former, ‘the poetry was sung simply, in a way consistent with its nature, so that everyone could understand and appreciate the words, rhythm and metre of the poetry’, whereas in the latter, vocal music had been ‘crippled’ by the introduction of imitation, canons, ‘strained passages’ and ‘repetitions’. One of the many ‘imperfections’ of modern music was that it had become more than ever ‘soft and lascivious’. Ancient music ‘had its rules, which no-one might violate, so that its propriety and fitting processes might be preserved’. From such a moralistic posture he deplored the spread of the new monodic style to liturgical, or at least church, music: a most serious defect was that there was no difference between ‘a song serenading a lady and one serving to honour God in church, a despicable abuse unworthy of Christian virtue’. Pietro della Valle, to whom the ...

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Robert R. Holzer

(b Chios, Sept 13, 1564; d Rome, Dec 28, 1637). Italian writer on music. His father, the Genoese governor of Chios, brought the family to Rome after the Turks conquered the Aegean island in 1566. There he made a fortune in banking, which gave his son the means to pursue a lifelong passion for art. Giustiniani was one of the most discerning patrons of his time: an early supporter of Caravaggio and Poussin, he also published one of the first illustrated guides to an art collection, the ...

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Norbert Dubowy

( fl 1743–67). Italian theatre chronicler . His Catalogo di tutti drammi per musica (Venice, c 1745) lists operas staged in Venice from 1637 to 1745; some copies have handwritten or printed additions up to 1752. Based on earlier works by Ivanovich and Bonlini, Groppo’s catalogue goes beyond these in including a list of the Venetian banquet plays. The detailed bibliographic information he gives on the librettos suggests that it was meant to be used as a guide for collectors. It is not known whether the various other catalogues announced in the book were ever printed, but the ...

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Monica Hall

(fl 17th century). Spanish writer on the guitar. He is known only as the author of a short treatise on the five-course guitar entitled Arte de la guitarra, which survives as the first four folios of an undated manuscript ( E-Mn 5917) copied by D. Macario Fariñas del Corral. The first two folios are incomplete and the treatise contains no music. The text is divided into ten rules, several of which refer to a table of guitar chords now lost. It employs Castilian ...

Article

George J. Buelow

(b Quedlinburg, Saxe-Anhalt, bap. June 2, 1611; d Sülzhayn, Harz Mountains, July 31, 1673). German theologian and writer on music. He was educated in the schools of Quedlinburg, including the Lateinschule, where he studied with Henricus Baryphonus. A scholarship from the town enabled him to enrol at the University of Helmstedt, where he spent three years studying theology. In ...

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John H. Baron

(b ?Kiel, 1643; d Hamburg, May 20, 1721). German organist and writer, son of Jakob Kortkamp. He studied under Weckmann from 1655 until about 1661, and later in the 1660s he served for a short time as organist at the Jakobikirche, Hamburg, under Christoph Bernhard. His main posts – though they were not important ones – were as organist at two other Hamburg churches, the Maria-Magdalena Kloster (...

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Anna Szweykowska

(b Florence; fl 1690–98). Italian writer. Between 1690 and 1696 he was in Warsaw in the service of the nuncio Andrea Santa Croce, and in 1697 he was in Vienna in the same role. He was in London in 1698 as a correspondent of the Tuscan court, a post he held from ...

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Mirosław Perz

(b Żmudź district, Lithuania, c1596; d Sept 11, 1670). Polish-Lithuanian writer on music. He was a Jesuit and studied philosophy and classical languages at the Vilnius Academy, 1619–22. He taught at the Jesuit colleges of Płock, Nieśwież, Braniewo and Kroża, and also from ...

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(b Rouen, 1674; d Rouen, Nov 10, 1707). French writer on music. He was educated by the Jesuits and studied philosophy and law before assuming his father’s post as Keeper of the Seals of the Parliament of Normandy in 1696. Spurred on by the appearance of the ...

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Yolande de Brossard

( b Carentan, Normandy, 1595; d Paris, 1665). French writer . He settled in Paris, where he published his first poems, including the Poésies burlesques, in 1647. Some years later he obtained the patronage of Marie d’Orléans, Princess of Longueville, who became the Duchess of Nemours when she married. She granted him a pension of 350 livres and lodgings in her residence. Loret began producing a rhyming gazette for her: a weekly letter in diary form, giving an account of the news at court and in the city in octosyllabic verse. It first appeared on ...

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( b Lyons, March 9, 1631; d Paris, Jan 21, 1705). French writer . Menestrier studied at the Jesuit Collège de la Trinité in Lyons and subsequently taught rhetoric there, having joined the Jesuit order in 1646. He later taught at Chambéry, Vienne (Isère) and Grenoble before being recalled to the college at Lyons. It was during this latter stay there that he developed the special interest in the history and organization of public festivals and ceremonies that occupied him for most of his life. This interest resulted not only in his organizing such events (for example on the occasion of the visit of Louis XIV to Lyons in ...