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Article

Claudio Annibaldi

( b Rome, March 31, 1571; d Rome, February 10, 1621). Italian ecclesiastic and patron of music . Nephew of Pope Clement VIII, who created him cardinal in 1593, he acquired a leading role in the papal court by negotiating the reversion of the Duchy of Ferrara to the papacy (...

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Michael Tilmouth and Simon McVeigh

(b Rushden, Northants., Jan 14, 1644; d London, Sept 27, 1714). English patron of music and amateur musician. He served a seven-year apprenticeship with a London coal dealer and, after returning to Northamptonshire for a while, set up in business in London, where by ...

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(bap. Handsworth, Yorks., Dec 16, 1593; d Welbeck Abbey, Notts., Dec 25, 1676). English poet, playwright and music patron. Christopher Simpson recognized his knowledge of and skill in the science of music and praised him for ‘cherishing and maintaining such as are excellent in it’ (...

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Herbert Seifert

( b Vienna, Oct 1, 1685; d Vienna, Oct 20, 1740). Austrian patron, Holy Roman Emperor . The younger son of the Habsburg Emperor Leopold I, he was declared King of Spain in 1703 in opposition to Philip V. Charles had his residence in Barcelona, where he also maintained a musical establishment. Several operas with texts by Pariati and Zeno and music by Caldara, Albinoni, Gasparini and others were performed there, beginning in ...

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(b Hillerød, April 12, 1577; d Copenhagen, Feb 28, 1648). Danish ruler and patron of music. He succeeded to the throne on the death of his father, Frederik II, in 1588 but ruled under a regency until his coronation in 1596. In the course of his education he revealed a marked interest in the arts, especially architecture and music, both of which enjoyed the advantage of his personal encouragement throughout his long reign, with results that have contributed much to the enduring impression of the period as a golden age in Danish history....

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Thomas Walker

(b ?Piazzola sul Brenta, nr Padua, Feb 20, 1632; d Padua, ?17 ? May 1689). Italian patron of the arts. He came of a wealthy and noble Venetian family and built two theatres on his estate, Piazzola sul Brenta. There he commissioned and produced a series of operas and other entertainments during the 1670s and 80s, engaging several of Venice's leading composers, notably Carlo Pallavicino and Domenico Freschi. His collection of over 1000 manuscript scores of the period ...

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Josef-Horst Lederer and Andrew H. Weaver

(b Graz, July 13, 1608; d Vienna, April 2, 1657). Austrian emperor, patron of music, and composer. He was the son of Ferdinand II and became King of the Romans in 1636 and Holy Roman Emperor in 1637; he was succeeded by his son Leopold I. Like his father, he was an enthusiastic patron of music; he maintained a large chapel and used music (both sacred and secular) to shape his public image and maintain political power during the disastrous final decade of the Thirty Years’ War. Also like his father, his musical tastes were decidedly Italianate. Most of the musicians in his chapel were Italian, among the most prominent of which were ...

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Christopher Wilkinson

(b Ohlau [now Oława], nr Breslau [now Wrocław], Jan 22, 1595; d Breslau, Jan 14, 1653). German patron, bibliophile, composer and poet. The son of Joachim Friedrich, Duke of Brieg-Liegnitz, he became duke in 1613 at the age of 18. He was educated at the university at Frankfurt an der Oder (Słubice). In his early years he was active as composer and poet. He displayed his love of music as early as ...

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Anthony Newcomb

(b ?Ferrara, c1570; d Aug 25, 1649). Italian musician and patron of music. In 1600 Artusi described him as ‘a young virtuoso and as great a lover of music as any man I have ever known’. In November 1598 a musical gathering in Goretti's house in Ferrara heard madrigals by Monteverdi and other modern composers, sparking off the Artusi-Monteverdi controversy. Goretti also received dedications from G.B. Buonamente (...

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Jonathan P. Wainwright

(b Barking, Essex, June 28, 1605; d nr Corby, Northamptonshire, July 4, 1670). English music patron and collector. His family's principal residence was at Kirby Hall, near Corby. His father, also Sir Christopher Hatton (c1570–1619), was a patron of Orlando Gibbons; Gibbons's ...

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Rudolf Schnitzler and Herbert Seifert

(b Vienna, June 9, 1640; d Vienna, May 5, 1705). Austrian composer and patron of music . He was the second son of Emperor Ferdinand III. A member of the house of Habsburg, he received a broad humanistic education under the tutelage of the Jesuit Neidhard to prepare him for intellectual and spiritual pursuits rather than for the succession to the throne. His training included extensive instruction in playing various instruments (notably the harpsichord, violin and recorder) and in composition, probably at the hands of Antonio Bertali and Markus and Wolfgang Ebner, the last of whom kept a collection of his early works, ...

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Margaret M. McGowan

(b PARIS, Sept 27, 1601; d Paris, May 14, 1643). French ruler, patron of music and composer. He was the son of Henri IV, whom he succeeded in 1610. His doctor recorded that from an early age he took a lively interest in music and dancing; he continually invented new steps and songs and had musicians sing and play for him. This passionate interest, however, did nothing to change radically the nature of music at his court. He maintained the same musical establishment as his father (30 musicians in the royal chapel and the ‘24 violons du roi’) and enjoyed the same kind of ...

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Michel Le Moël

(b c1650; d Paris, March 30, 1706). French musical amateur . The son of a Parisian doctor, Mathieu was inducted into the living of Saint-André-des-Arts, Paris, in 1678. In 1685 he commissioned Alexandre Thierry to improve the church organ; the organist was Claude Rachel de Montalan, Molière’s son-in-law. For several years Mathieu presided over weekly concerts which took place in his presbytry in rue du Cimetière-Saint-André (now rue Suger) and were attended by his parishioners, many of whom belonged to the famous families of the ...

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James R. Anthony

(b Pescina, Aquila, July 14, 1602; d Vincennes, nr Paris, March 9, 1661). French politician of Italian birth . He is important in the history of music for his advocacy of Italian opera in France. In his youth he was exposed to Roman opera while serving Cardinal Antonio Barberini; he attended, and perhaps participated in, Landi’s ...

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(b c1571; dRome, June 2, 1623). Italian patron of music. He received the title of cardinal from his great-uncle Pope Sixtus V in 1585. He became Cardinal Legate of Bologna in 1587 and vice-chancellor of the Church in 1589. A friend and protégé of Ferdinando de' Medici, he became the wealthiest and most powerful member of the curia, and the patron of many important painters and musicians. He trained as a musician, perhaps with Scipione Dentice, with whom he was associated before ...

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Horace Fishback

Reviser Eva Linfield

(b Kassel, May 25, 1572; d Eschwege, March 15, 1632). German patron and composer. He succeeded his father as Landgrave of Hesse in 1592 and ruled until 1627, when, under the pressures of the Thirty Years War, he abdicated in favour of his son and retired to Eschwege. He encouraged an exceptionally flourishing musical life at his court and himself studied vocal and instrumental music with Georg Otto, court composer and Kapellmeister from ...

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Lowell Lindgren

(b Rome, April 25, 1653; d Rome, March 22, 1730). Italian patron and librettist . His immense wealth was largely derived from a pension granted by his great-uncle, Pope Innocent X, his salary as Grand Prior in Rome of the Knights of Malta from ...

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Carlo Vitali

(b Bologna, June 17, 1684; d Bologna, Nov 11, 1750). Italian patron. The second son of Count Cornelio and Maria Caterina Bentivoglio, he was married to Princess Eleonora Colonna of Rome. In 1740 he was appointed privy councillor to the German emperor Karl VI. With his fine taste, considerable wealth and personal or family connections he had a far-reaching influence on European theatrical life, not only in Bologna (where he led the management committee of the Malvezzi theatre), but also in Venice, Florence, Rome, Vienna, London and in various German cities. His correspondence during ...