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Article

David B. Levy

(b Alsager, Cheshire, Sept 27, 1779; d London, Nov 15, 1846). English music critic and patron. He was proprietor of and writer for The Times, an association formed in 1817 through his friendship with Thomas Barnes. Alsager reported on financial matters and foreign news, but evidence reveals that both he and Barnes wrote most of the articles on theatre and music in ...

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Ann Willison Lemke

(b Frankfurt, April 4, 1785; d Berlin, Jan 20, 1859). German writer, editor, publisher, composer, singer, visual artist and patron of young artists. Although known today primarily for her writing and her illustrious associates, Bettine was also a talented musician. She composed songs in a simple folk style, choosing texts by poets she knew and loved, including Goethe, Achim von Armin, and her brother, ...

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Nicholas Temperley

(b London, Feb 3, 1784; d Wansford, Northants., Oct 16, 1859). English amateur musician. He was the eldest son of the 10th Earl of Westmorland, a Tory politician, and was educated at Harrow and at Trinity College, Cambridge (MA 1808), where he studied music under Charles Hague. His career was political, military and diplomatic. He was MP for Lyme Regis (...

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Richard Crawford

(b Dunfermline, Scotland, Nov 25, 1835; d Lenox, MA, Aug 11, 1919). American philanthropist and arts patron of Scottish birth. Born in poverty, he immigrated to Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in 1848 and rose, in one of the most successful careers in American business history, to become the dominant figure in the international steel industry. He came to believe that the accumulator of a fortune had a duty to spend it for the good of mankind, and he devoted much energy during his last 40 years to philanthropy. His benefactions centered on educational projects and the promotion of world peace, for which he endowed various foundations. He also supported some musical activities. He contributed about $6,000,000 to the building of organs for churches in the USA and the British Empire. Although he believed that concert organizations should be self-supporting, he lent his name and some of his time and money to several. These included the New York Oratorio Society and the New York SO, both of which were conducted by Walter Damrosch (son-in-law of Carnegie’s good friend, the politician James G. Blaine) and for both of which Carnegie served as president briefly from ...

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Frank Howes and Christina Bashford

(b Blackheath, London, July 11, 1847; d London, Jan 22, 1937). English amateur violinist, patron and lexicographer. Cobbett's efforts in the field of chamber music were important to the development of the English musical renaissance and to the cultivation and appreciation of chamber music in Britain; he is noted in particular for editing ...

Article

(b London, April 24, 1859; d London, Oct 27, 1917). English patron of London opera seasons from 1887 to 1914. A daughter of Sidney Herbert (Lord Herbert of Lea), Secretary of War during the Crimean War, and a close friend of the Prince and Princess of Wales, she ensured the social success of the ...

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(b Haverford, PA, Aug 24, 1888; d Chestnut Hill, PA, Sept 6, 1967). American writer on women in music. Her relatively casual girlhood interest in music was stimulated when she met Henry S. Drinker, a Philadelphia lawyer and dedicated amateur musician and musicologist. They married in ...

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Gary Galván

(b Waterville, NY, July 12, 1854; d Rochester, NY, March 14, 1932). American inventor, industrialist, and philanthropist. An autodidact, he pioneered modern photography with the development of a practical portable camera, affordable film, and simplified development processes that led to the mass production of photographic equipment. With thirty-two patents to his credit, Eastman established the Eastman Kodak Company as the world’s largest camera and film supplier and himself as one of the ten wealthiest men in the United States....

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Ralph P. Locke

(b New York, April 14, 1840; d Boston, July 17, 1924). American music patron. Isabella Stewart married John L. Gardner, a prominent Boston financier in 1860. She befriended several well-known musical figures, including Wilhelm Gericke, Ethelbert Nevin, Gustav Schirmer, Heinrich Gebhard, Margaret Ruthven Lang, Theodore and Rose Fay Thomas, Edward and Marian MacDowell, Nellie Melba, and Susan Metcalfe Casals. She was especially close to Karl Muck, Charles Martin Loeffler, and Henry Lee Higginson. A generous patron of Higginson’s fledgling Boston SO, Gardner also promoted the careers of individual musicians, among them the pianist George Proctor and, besides Loeffler, the composers Arthur Foote, Clayton Johns, and Amherst Webber; she organized concerts, made gifts of instruments and financial support, and provided helpful contacts. A devoted Wagnerian, her tastes also extended to recent French music (the Franck school and Fauré), early music (she owned an Érard harpsichord), and lighter pieces, such as the salon songs of Johns....

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(b 8/Dec 19, 1794; d Bogorodskoye, Kursk govt., 22 Oct /Nov 3, 1866). Russian music patron and cellist, father of Yury Nikolayevich Golitsïn. He served in the army (1810–32), fought in the 1812 war and was wounded at the Battle of Borodino. In his youth he spent some time in Vienna, acquiring there a sound knowledge of the Viennese Classics, and becoming an ardent admirer and collector of Beethoven’s music. He carried on a fruitful correspondence with Beethoven, starting in ...

Article

John Koegel

(b San Francisco, CA, Nov 7, 1875; d Flintridge, CA, Dec 25, 1954). American folklorist, writer, lecturer, music patron, and singer. Born into a wealthy family (her father James Hague was a prominent geologist and mining engineer), she used her inheritance to support her research into Latin American music, particularly Mexican American and Mexican folksong. Prior to moving to Pasadena, California, in ...

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Otto E. Albrecht and Robert von Zahn

(b Cologne, March 30, 1849; d Cologne, March 20, 1913). German music patron. The son of a teacher, he entered the paper business and in 1885 founded the paper manufacturing firm of Poensgen & Heyer. As an enthusiastic amateur he played a prominent part in Cologne musical life, serving on the boards of the conservatory and the Musikalische Gesellschaft and assisting young musicians at the start of their careers. He began to collect musical instruments in about ...

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Joseph Horowitz

(b New York, NY, Nov 18, 1834; d Boston, MA, Nov 14, 1919). American patron and orchestra founder. He moved to Boston at the age of four. Though his family, on both sides, was of distinguished Boston stock, his father was not wealthy. He attended the elite Boston Latin School and proceeded to Harvard University, but poor eyesight forced him to abandon college. He wound up a diligent music student in Vienna forced to skip meals for lack of means. When he discovered he had no special talent for music, he returned to Boston and was swallowed up by the Civil War; as Major Higginson, he was severely wounded in hand-to-hand combat. Having acquired French and German, soldiered with Americans from every walk of life, married the daughter of Louis Agassiz, and failed in business (an oil venture in Ohio, a cotton plantation with freedman in Georgia), he became a banker. Once he had amassed sufficient capital, he realized his life’s dream and founded a “Boston Symphony Orchestra.” According to a ...

Article

Gary Galván

(b Mineola, TX, July 10, 1882; d London, England, Aug 19, 1975). American art collector, preservationist, musician, and philanthropist. She was the only daughter of lawyer and Texas governor Colonel James Stephen Hogg. She was named after the heroine in the candid Civil War poem “The Fate of Marvin,” written by her uncle, Thomas Hogg [pseudo. Tom R. Burnett]. She never married and was known simply as Miss Ima for most of her life....

Article

Robert Stevenson and Jane Gottlieb

(b April 19, 1836; d New York, NY, April 25, 1919). American music patron. The son of Huguenot refugees, he was born on board a ship bound for the United States, after which his family settled in Ohio. Juilliard moved to New York at a young age, and eventually became an enormously successful textile merchant. A lifelong lover of the arts, Juilliard was a trustee of the Metropolitan Opera House. His will left approximately $12 million for the advancement of music in the United States; he stipulated that the fund be used to support the Metropolitan Opera, finance concerts, and assist deserving students. The trustees of his estate established the Juilliard Musical Foundation in ...

Article

Daniel Jay Grimminger

(b Mannheim, Germany, Feb 21, 1867; d New York, NY, March 29, 1934). Banker and music patron of German birth. Unlike his brother, Robert Kahn, who became a concert pianist, composer, and professor at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik, Otto Kahn found his niche in the more lucrative profession of finance. After working in London from ...

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Paul C. Echols and Esther R. Crookshank

(b New York, NY, March 8, 1839; d Poland Springs, ME, July 10, 1909). American philanthropist, activist, composer, and hymnal compiler. She was the daughter of lay Methodist evangelists Phoebe Palmer (1807–74), considered the founder of the American Holiness movement, and medical doctor Walter Palmer. The younger Phoebe began composing hymns and songs as a child; two of her earliest tunes, set to hymn texts by her mother, were published in Joseph Hillman’s revival song collection, ...

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Gary Galván

(b San Francisco, CA, Oct 18, 1873; d New York, NY, May 31, 1939). American lawyer, pianist, and music patron. The son of a shoe and boot dealer, Leventritt graduated from the University of California (A.B. 1894) and the New York Law School and practiced in San Francisco briefly before entering practice with his uncle, future Supreme Court Justice David Leventritt. He gained a reputation as a high profile and highly successful real estate and corporate attorney....

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Peter Wollny

(b Berlin, June 19, 1761; d Berlin, May 11, 1854). German harpsichordist, music collector and patron. She was a daughter of the Jewish banker Daniel Itzig (1723–99) and great-aunt of Mendelssohn. On 2 July 1783 she married the banker Samuel Salomon Levy (...

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James Doering

(b Hamburg, Germany, May 27, 1849; d Saranac Lake, NY, Aug 17, 1938). American philanthropist of German birth. He immigrated to the United States in 1867 and found success in the mining industry, presiding over several American mining corporations in the late nineteenth century. Lewisohn eventually settled in New York City and became involved in real estate development. His reputation as a philanthropist began in the early 1900s, and he gave generously to numerous causes, foundations, and organizations. An enthusiastic amateur singer, he believed strongly in music’s societal benefits, and he endowed many music appreciation initiatives at New York colleges. Most notable was his ...