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Roger Bowers

(b c1420; d 1497). English church musician. He was noted as a fine singer and skilful organist. After service in the household of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (until 1447), and as a lay clerk of Eton College (1447–51), where he was one of the four clerks specially responsible for singing polyphony in the college chapel, he became a clerk of the Chapel Royal in ...

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(b ?Liegnitz [now Legnica], c1494; d after 1527). German theorist. The family residence in Liegnitz is documented from 1381, but the name is absent from the town records begun in 1546. Bogentantz attended the Gymnasium in Goldberg, and in 1508 he matriculated in the faculty of arts of Cologne University, where he may have been the pupil of Cochlaeus and fellow student of Glarean. In ...

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(b Namur, c1472; d Lier, May 20, 1522). South Netherlandish organist and music teacher. In 1488 he was a singer at the church of Our Lady, Antwerp, and in 1491–2 served as organist at Jacobskerk in that city. In 1493 he became organist in the chapel of the Confraternity of Our Lady at Our Lady's church. In ...

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Heinrich Hüschen

(b Waischenfeld, c1484). German music theorist and theologian. He attended the cathedral school in Bamberg and in 1500 entered Leipzig University where he became Bachelor of Arts in 1507, Master of Arts in 1511 and from 1513 until 1515 taught as Master of Law. In ...

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Peter Bergquist and Stephen Keyl

(b Wipfeld, Feb 1, 1459; d Vienna, Feb 4, 1508). German humanist and poet. Son of a vintner, he ran away from home in 1477 and studied at Cologne University for two years. After receiving the baccalaureate he travelled and studied further before matriculating in ...

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(b Wendelstein, Jan 10, 1479; d Breslau, Jan 10, 1552). German theologian, historian, humanist, music theorist and pedagogue. After studies with Heinrich Grieninger in Nuremberg, Cochlaeus entered the University of Cologne in 1504. A year later he had already gained the baccalaureate degree and in ...

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Michael Fend

(b Etaples,c1460; d Nérac, 1536). French theologian, scholar and music theorist . He matriculated at the University of Paris, possibly in 1474 or 1475, and received the BA in 1479 and the MA probably in 1480. He taught in the Faculty of Arts at the Collège du Cardinal Lemoine, University of Paris, until ...

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Howard Mayer Brown and David Fallows

(b before c1429; d after 1472). French playwright and musician. By 17 July 1450, when he is mentioned as organist at the Cathedral of Notre Dame, Paris, he was already designated magister; on 19 October of that year he also became magister cantus puerorum...

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Jan Kouba

(b Husinec, Bohemia, ?1371; d Konstanz, July 6, 1415). Czech reformer. He was one of the most influential preachers and teachers at Prague University at the beginning of the 15th century. He was burnt at the stake by order of the Council of Konstanz. He has been associated with a number of Latin and Czech hymns, but there is very little evidence to support his authorship; it seems that he arranged the medieval melody ‘Jesu Kriste, štědrý kněže’ (‘Jesus Christ, thou bountiful prince’) in the Jistebnice Hussite hymnbook, and he may also have arranged or translated the texts of several other hymns, but the best-known one attributed to him, ‘Jesus Christus, nostra salus’, is clearly not by him. Some Czech musicologists (e.g. Nejedlý) have described Hus as the innovator of congregational singing in church, but this practice arose in 15th-century Bohemia only after his death. Hus's aesthetic views on music and singing did not deviate from those of the medieval tradition. Thus musical history was influenced only indirectly by him: the Hussite reformation, of which he was the inspiration, constitutes the first significant chapter in the history of Protestant church music in Europe....

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Elżbieta Witkowska-Zaremba

(b Glogau [now Głogów], ?c1445; d Kraków, Feb 11, 1507). Polish philosopher, astronomer and music theorist. After studying at Kraków University, he was a lecturer there for 40 years. During 1497–8 he lectured in mathematics in Vienna. He was one of the leading scholars in Kraków and Copernicus was probably among his pupils. A manuscript from the Krasiński Library, Warsaw, that included two treatises associated with Jan z Głogowa (MS 47) was destroyed during World War II. The treatises taken together were most probably a commentary on Johannes de Muris’s ...

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Gordon A. Anderson

(b Giengen an der Brenz, c1400; d Rome, June 29, 1450). German theologian and writer. He studied theology, philosophy and the liberal arts at the University of Vienna from 1422 to 1429, and as a Master of Arts lectured there in mathematics, philosophy and theory from ...

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Don Harrán

(b ?Bourges, c1430–40; d ?Paris, 1499). French singer and scholar. He was the author of two tracts on verbal accentuation in plainchant. His early years seem to have been spent in Bourges, where he became a canon of Notre Dame de Sales (his familiarity with the Bourges chant tradition is clear from his writings). Later he was in Paris at the Collège de Navarre, where he enrolled in the 1450s as a student in the arts faculty and from ...

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Elżbieta Witkowska-Zaremba

(b Legnica, 1464; d after 1546). German humanist, theorist and composer, active in Poland. He belonged to a German family in Silesia and his true name was probably Weihrauch. In 1494 he began his studies at Kraków University, and later went to Cologne for a time before returning to Kraków in ...

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(b Baeza, Andalucía, c1440; d ?Rome, after 1490). Spanish theorist and composer active in Italy. His life is undocumented; all that is known about him comes from his own testimony or that of later writers. His first teacher was one Johannes de Monte. He claimed to have lectured at the University of Salamanca for a time, though his position (as later in Bologna) may have been unofficial. While there he wrote a treatise in Spanish (perhaps the one he elsewhere referred to as ...

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Jurij Snoj

(b Ljubljana, Slovenia, March 21, 1456; d Vienna, Austria, April 26, 1522). Churchman and musician of Slovenian origin. He was a native of Ljubljana (Ger. Laibach, in his time the capital of the Habsburg Carniola) and considered himself a Slovenian. He interpreted his name (etymologically incorrectly) as Slovenian for ‘golden horse’, hence the presence of a horse in his coat of arms and the translation of his name into Greek as ‘Chrysippos’. (In Slovenian literature, following the modern Slovenian orthography, his name appears as Jurij Slatkonja). In ...

Article

Craig Wright

(b c1370; d before Aug 1410). French composer and pedagogue . Tapissier, whose true name was Jean de Noyers, is named along with the composers Susay and Jehan Vaillant in the anonymous Règles de la seconde rhétorique (c1400) as one of the principal French poet-musicians of the day. By ...

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(b Pavia, April 9, 1470; d ?Urbino, Dec 1530). Italian lutenist, singer and teacher. In Milan in 1492 he provided improvised accompaniments for ottava rima recitations, a manner of strambotto performance that was later cultivated at Mantua. By 1495 or 1496 Testagrossa had succeeded Girolamo Sextula at the Gonzaga court in Mantua as lute teacher to Isabella d’Este; he remained there until about ...