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Noël Goodwin

The first event described as a festival in this seaside resort on the English south coast was in 1870, when a series of oratorio concerts at the Dome was organized on a subscription basis by Wilhelm Kuhe, a pupil of Tomášek and Thalberg, who came to England in ...

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Association active in Britain since 1921. See Festival, §3.

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The headquarters in Camden Town, London, of the English Folk Dance and Song Society.

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The section of the English court musical establishment devoted to the performance of sacred music; see London, §II, 1. For other royal chapels, seeChapel.

London (i), §II, 1: Music at court: The Chapel Royal

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London theatre, home since 1968 of the English National Opera (Sadlers’ Wells Opera until 1974). See London, §IV, 3.

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Josef Häusler

Town in Germany. It was noted in the 20th century for its festival of contemporary music. It was the home of the Fürstenbergs from 1488; they maintained a court chapel and opera which achieved particularly high standards during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and employed musicians such as J.W. Kalliwoda, J.A. Sixt, Joseph Fiala and Conradin Kreutzer. The works of Mozart, Dittersdorf, Umlauf and J.A. Hiller were particularly popular there and Italian works by Cimarosa, Gazzaniga, Piccinni, Sarti, Salieri and Paisiello were frequently heard. It became an internationally known centre for contemporary music between ...

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Austrian festival, held each September in Eisenstadt, capital of the Burgenland, where Haydn spent much of his working life in the employment of the Esterházy family. Founded officially in 1987, the festival has developed around the Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra under the direction of Adam Fischer. Each festival includes symphony concerts, lieder and chamber recitals, often featuring rare Haydn repertory such as the baryton trios, and the production of a Haydn opera. In addition to the concerts and opera performances, held in the Esterházy palace, one or more Haydn masses are given each year in their liturgical setting in the Bergkirche....

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Malcolm Boyd

A competitive festival of Welsh origin, devoted mainly to music and literature. The word ‘eisteddfod’ (literally ‘a session’) did not come into common use until the 18th century, but the festival to which it refers originated in the medieval gatherings held from time to time to determine the professional requirements and duties of the bards. The earliest of these for which we have reliable documentary evidence was that summoned by Lord Rhys ap Gruffydd at Cardigan in ...

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Noël Goodwin

An annual series of concerts, opera productions and other events, which has regularly exceeded the implications of its title. It was founded in 1963 by Lina Lalandi, the Greek-born harpsichordist and singer. She originally based the festival in Oxford, making use of several notable university and other buildings. In ...

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Annual festival in Belgium; it includes musical activities based in Antwerp, Bruges, Brussels and other cities in Belgium.

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Dutch organization. It was founded in 1945 by Walter A.F. Maas, a Jewish émigré from Mainz, at Bilthoven in the Netherlands. It is based in the Huize Gaudeamus, a villa built in the shape of a grand piano by the composer Julius Röntgen (i), and its aim is the promotion of new music, particularly that of Dutch composers. From ...

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Romanian music festival. Held in Bucharest every other year in August and September, it lasts for over three weeks. It was established in 1958, three years after George Enescu’s death, and in his honour. The decision was also politically motivated, as the communist regime of the time was eager to prove its ability as a non-capitalist cultural power. Since then, it has changed on many levels and has become not only the grandest classical music festival in Romania and Eastern Europe, but has gained a growing renown within Europe’s important festival scene....

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Annual English music festival devoted to the performance of early music, founded by Arnold Dolmetsch in 1925. See under Dolmetsch family family.

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Wilma Tichelaar

A series of international music, opera and dance events, with drama performances and art exhibitions, held annually in Amsterdam in June and July. Until the mid-1980s performances were also held in The Hague, Rotterdam and other Dutch cities.

The festival was initiated in 1948 as a means of revitalizing the nation’s cultural life after World War II. In the early years the Dutch government and local authorities of the participating cities, which funded 90% of the festival’s total costs, sought to attract foreign investment, promote tourism and foster international cultural exchange. By ...

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Romanian contemporary music festival. It has been held the last week of every May in Bucharest since 1991. The festival was founded at the initiative of the Union of Romanian Composers and Musicologists and of Ştefan Niculescu (1927–2008), one of the most important Romanian composers of the past generation. It was the first international festival organized in Romania that was entirely dedicated to contemporary music....

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A leading London opera house, in the Haymarket, between 1705 and 1910; it was known as the Queen’s Theatre during Anne’s reign, and Her Majesty’s or the Royal Italian Opera during Victoria’s. See London, §V, 1 and London.

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London theatre built in 1772, and reopened in 1834 as the English Opera House. See London, §VI, 1, (i).

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Bulgarian music festival. The festival began as an initiative of the Ruse Philharmonic Orchestra, the conductor Sasha Popov, and the conductor and composer Iliya Temkov, for the purpose of fostering friendship and cultural cooperation between Bulgaria and the German Democratic Republic. The first concert, given on ...

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London theatre built in 1891 as the English Opera House. See London, §VI, 1, (i) .

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Claude Samuel

Annual festival held in Prades, a small mountain village in France, 40 km from Perpignan. In 1939 Pablo Casals exiled himself there as a protest against General Franco's regime in Spain. Ten years later Casals was visited by the violinist Alexander Schneider, who offered him substantial contracts for an American tour; Casals refused, but agreed to the idea of inviting musicians to Prades to perform with him in commemoration of the bicentenary of Bach’s death. The event's success led to its being repeated annually during July and August. The Prades Festival is run by an association whose president is also the town's mayor, and is funded by municipal, regional and national grants. In ...