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French institution. Created as the Petite Académie in 1623, the organization that was to become the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres was initially dedicated to the glory of the king and to the history of his reign. Its scope was enlarged in 1703 by Gros de Boze, who called for the study of all aspects of civilization, from its origins to the 18th century. Discussions of music seem to have taken place from the end of the 17th century under the aegis of Charles Perrault, although documentation of such discussions dates only from ...

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German musical organization. Established in 1861 in Weimar and dedicated to the promotion of new music (primarily through performance), the Allgemeiner Deutscher Musikverein (ADMV) was the first national music society in Germany. Focal points of its activity were the annual festivals that took place in alternating German and German-speaking cities and initially featured the music of Liszt and his colleagues in the ‘New German’ movement. During its first decade the ADMV gave premières of music by such composers as Wagner, Liszt, Cornelius and Felix Draeseke. Liszt provided the society with artistic leadership but, as president, Franz Brendel was the chief guiding spirit during its early years. Upon Brendel’s death in ...

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A British society founded in 1993 by the Composers' Guild of Great Britain, the Association of Professional Composers and the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors.

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Organization founded in 1951 in Dublin. See Dublin, §11 .

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English society founded in 1849 by Sterndale Bennett as part of the English Bach Revival. See Bach Revival, §2.

Article

Austrian, German and American organizations. After World War I numerous Bruckner societies were established in Austria and Germany; the one founded in Leipzig in 1925 became the International Bruckner Society (Ger. Internationale Bruckner-Gesellschaft), based in Vienna, in 1929. It published the periodical Bruckner-Blätter until 1940...

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The music department is a part of the Research Institute of the Arts, which also includes Fine Art Studies, Theatre Studies, Screen Arts Studies (after 1988), and Architectural Studies (since 2010). The music department existed independently until 1988 as an Institute of Music. The Institute of Music was established in ...

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Organization established in Dunfermline in 1913 for ‘the improvement of the well-being of the masses of the people of Great Britain and Ireland’. The trust's first undertaking was the completion of a scheme, begun by Andrew Carnegie, for the installation of organs in over 3800 churches and chapels. Between ...

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Jonathan Spencer Jones

Private opera organization founded in 1997 by Argentine soprano Adelaida Negri to support young singers and perform lesser known Italian bel canto operas. See Argentina and Buenos Aires.

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Peter Dickinson

A program for study, research, and performance of American music, based at Keele University, Staffordshire, England. It was founded in 1974 by Peter Dickinson, the first professor of music at the university’s newly established department of music. The center, which housed an excellent collection of American music materials, sponsored the Ives centenary concerts (...

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Michael H.S. van Eekeren

A non-profit organization promoting the work of Dutch composers and musicians. Although there are other promoters of Dutch music in the Netherlands, CNM is unique in the range of its support. It concerns itself with contemporary and older music, with improvised and amateur music; it produces CDs and books, organizes concerts in the Netherlands, stimulates educational projects and collaborates extensively with Dutch public radio stations....

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English organization, founded in London in 1942 and later renamed Society for the Promotion of New Music.

Chagrin, Francis

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Eric Blom and Beverly Wilcox

A concert series founded in Paris in 1725 by Anne Danican Philidor, initially to perform instrumental music and sacred works with Latin texts during Holy Week and feast days when the theatres were closed. Secular works with French texts were sung in special concerts français...

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Italian society active from 1923 to 1928, founded by Alfredo Casella. See also Italy, §I, 7.

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Alan L. Spurgeon

Professional organization for Dalcroze teachers. The organization promotes the artistic and pedagogical principles of Emile Jacques-Dalcroze (1865–1950), a Swiss composer and teacher whose approach to music education consists of three components: eurythmics, which teaches concepts of rhythm, structure, and musical expression through movement; solfége, which develops an understanding of pitch, scale, and tonality through activities emphasizing aural comprehension and vocal improvisation; and improvisation, which develops an understanding of form and meaning through spontaneous musical creation using movement, voice, and instruments. Dalcroze intended that the three subjects be intertwined so that the development of the inner ear, an internal muscular sense, and creative expression might work together to form the core of basic musicianship. The Dalcroze Society of America began to take shape in ...

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A society founded in 1954 by J.P. Larsen, Nils Schiørring, Henrik Glahn and Sven Lunn to promote musicology in Denmark, through publications and lectures, and to be a link with similar organizations abroad. It arranged congresses of Scandinavian musicologists at Copenhagen (1958), Århus (...

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English organization. It was founded in 1962 to promote a wider knowledge and appreciation of the music of Frederick Delius and to encourage the performance and recording of his works. Delius's amanuensis Eric Fenby (1906–97) was the society's first president, succeeded in 1997...

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Pamela M. Potter

German organization for the promotion of musicology. It was founded in 1918 on the initiative of Hermann Abert to replace the International Music Society, disbanded at the outbreak of Word War I, and to serve as the central scholarly society for German-speaking musicologists. Its journal, the ...

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Johan Kolsteeg

Dutch organization based in Amsterdam. It was set up in 1947 with assistance from the Stichting Nederlandse Muziekbelangen (Foundation for Netherlands Musical Interests) and central government, with the aim of documenting and publishing modern Dutch music. This move was prompted by the loss of a number of scores, including some by Willem Pijper, in the bombing of Rotterdam in ...

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Maud Karpeles and Alain Frogley

English organization, formed in 1932 by the amalgamation of the Folk-Song Society and the English Folk Dance Society.

The Folk-Song Society was founded in London in 1898 by a group of leading musicians in order to direct ‘the collection and preservation of Folk Songs, Ballads and Tunes and the publication of such of these as may be advisable’. Between ...