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Tully Potter

English string quartet. It was founded in 1926 as the Stratton Quartet by George Stratton, William Manuel, Lawrence Leonard and John Moore, and developed from the Wood Smith Quartet, in which Stratton and Moore played. It found fame after Carl Taylor and Watson Forbes took over the inner parts in ...

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Tully Potter

Austrian string quartet . It was founded in 1970 by Günter Pichler (b Kufstein, Tyrol, 9 Sept 1940), Klaus Mätzl, Hatto Beyerle and Valentin Erben (b Pernitz, 14 March 1945). Mätzl was replaced in 1978 by Gerhard Schulz (b Linz, 23 Sept 1951...

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Nicholas Anderson

Dutch period-instrument orchestra. Founded by Ton Koopman in 1979, it has toured widely and has made numerous recordings, notably of music by Bach (including a complete cycle of cantatas), Handel and Mozart. Koopman performs regularly with the orchestra both as conductor and as harpsichordist and organist. Under his directorship it has acquired a reputation for lively, warm-toned, stylistically distinctive playing....

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Harald Goertz

Austrian choir. It was founded in 1972 by Erwin Ortner, who in 1996 was appointed rector of the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna. The choir's name reflects three of its main emphases: Austrian music, new music, and a commitment to the works of Arnold Schoenberg. The choir is made up largely of students and former students of the Hochschule für Musik and expands or contracts according to the works it performs. For example, the choir was reduced to 12 voices for Messiaen's ...

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Richard Wigmore

Austrian string quartet. It was founded in 1980 by Peter Schuhmayer and Manfred Honeck, violins, Herbert Kefer, viola, and Othmar Müller, cello, all of whom studied at the Vienna Musikhochschule with Hatto Beyerle and Alfred Staar. Johannes Meissl replaced Honeck in 1982. In 1984–5 the group studied with the La Salle Quartet in Cincinnati, after which they quickly established an international reputation with débuts in Paris (...

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British organization, incorporated by royal charter in 1948 to take the place of the wartime Council for the Encouragement of Music and the Arts and to administer the subsidies granted by the state to artistic enterprises.

The Arts Council worked through panels, musical, literary, dramatic etc., independently of the government, though the government supplied its funds. It was not intended to represent an ‘establishment’ view of the arts and their place in society, and aimed for ‘patronage without control’. Regional arts associations working under its aegis and partly supported by the council, were free to form their own policies. The council’s care for music extended beyond professional orchestras and opera companies to amateur groups. London organizations (especially the Royal Opera House) took the greatest share of subsidies, but the policy from the 1960s and 1970s was to foster the arts in the regions by its support of small touring companies....

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French Baroque vocal and instrumental ensemble. It was founded in Paris in 1979 by William Christie .

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Tully Potter

Hungarian string quartet. It was founded in 1960 by Péter Komlós (b Budapest, 25 Oct 1935), Sándor Devich (b Szeged, 19 Jan 1935), Géza Németh (b Beregszász [now Beregovo, Ukraine], 23 July 1936) and László Mező, all students in Leó Weiner's chamber music class at the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest. At first they performed as the Komlós Quartet – making their Budapest début in ...

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Walter Everett

English pop group. George Harrison (b Liverpool, England, Feb 25, 1943; d Los Angeles, Nov 29, 2001), John Lennon (John Winston (Ono) Lennon; b Liverpool, Oct 9, 1940; d New York, Dec 8, 1980), Paul McCartney (James Paul McCartney; b Liverpool, June 18, 1942...

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Tully Potter

Russian string ensemble, founded in 1923 as the Moscow Conservatory Quartet by Dmitry Tsïganov, Vasily Shirinsky, Vadim Borisovsky and Sergey Shirinsky. In 1927 the group presented its first Beethoven cycle for the composer's centenary; and after another successful cycle in 1931 it took the name by which it became known throughout the world. It gave the first performance of Myaskovsky’s quartets from no.4 onwards. Its members taught with distinction at the Moscow Conservatory and were all well known in their own right – Vasily Shirinsky was a noted musicologist. In ...

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Richard Wigmore

English string quartet. The quartet, which is based in London, was formed by Corina Belcea and Laura Samuel (violins), Krzysztof Chorzelski (viola) and Matthew Talty (cello) in 1994, while all four were students at the RCM. Early mentors included the Chilingirian Quartet, Simon Rowland-Jones and the surviving members of the ...

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Tully Potter

Russian string quartet. It was founded at the Moscow Conservatory in 1945 by the viola virtuoso Rudolf Barshay, with the violinists Rostislav Dubinsky and Vladimir Rabeiy and the cellist Mstislav Rostropovich (soon replaced by Valentin Berlinsky). The ensemble gave its first concert in October 1946...

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Tully Potter

German string quartet . It was formed in 1976 by members of the Berlin PO: Thomas Brandis, Peter Brehm, Rainer Moog (soon replaced by Wilfried Strehle) and Wolfgang Boettcher. That year Boettcher left the Berlin PO to devote more time to solo work and teaching, and Brandis followed suit in ...

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Tully Potter

English string quartet. It was founded in 1972 by Michael Thomas, Ian Belton, A. Robertson and Jacqueline Thomas, who at the time were aged 11 to 13 and at school in north-east England. They studied at the RNCM in Manchester and named their ensemble after Adolph Brodsky. Their teachers included the cellist Terence Weil, members of the Vermeer and Amadeus Quartets, Zoltan Székely and Andras Mihály. The group won prizes at the Portsmouth competition in ...

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Robert Philip

String quartet of Hungarian origin. The original members were Emil Hauser, Imre Poganyi, Istvan Ipolyi and Harry Son, all of whom played in the orchestra at the Royal Hungarian Opera House. They gave their first concert in 1917 at Kolozsvar (now Cluj-Napoca). Their European tours during the 1920s included visits to London, first in ...

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Orchestra based in Sofia. This orchestra has held a leading position in Bulgarian musical culture. The principal conductor of the orchestra since 2008 has been Emil Tabakov. The orchestra was established in 1948 by violinist and conductor Vassil Stefanov (1913–91) as a chamber orchestra. In ...

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Tully Potter

French string quartet. It was founded in Paris in 1919 by Joseph Calvet (b Toulouse, 8 Oct 1897; d Paris, 4 May 1984), Georges Mignot, Léon Pascal and Paul Mas. Mignot and Pascal had previously played in Marcel Chailley's quartet. In 1928 the ensemble gave its first Beethoven cycle at the instigation of Nadia Boulanger. In ...

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Tully Potter

Swiss string quartet. It was founded in Zürich in 1984 by Matthias Enderle, Karin Heeg, Wendy Champney and Stephan Goerner. The Swiss members met as students at the Winterthur Conservatory and Enderle got to know the American viola player Champney when they were studying at the International Menuhin Music Academy. The group's mentors included Sándor Végh and Nikolaus Harnoncourt. In ...

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CeBeDeM  

Henri Vanhulst

Founded in 1951, the Centre Belge de Documentation Musicale was a non-profit-making society dependent on the Belgian federal government. It was affiliated with the International Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres and was a member of the International Association of Music Information Centres...

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Chef  

In French usage a chef d’orchestre is the conductor of an orchestra. A chef d’attaque is a section leader in a choir or, by extension, in an orchestra. In military parlance chef de musique refers to the head of regimental music, hence a bandmaster.