1-20 of 103 results  for:

  • Publishing and Recording Industry x
  • 19th c. /Romantic (1800-1900) x
Clear all

Article

(b Meadow, TN, Oct 24, 1867; d Birmingham, England, Oct 13, 1920). American revivalist and publisher. He attended Maryville College, Tennessee, and the Moody Bible Institute, Chicago; in 1893 he assisted Moody in his revival at the World’s Colombian Exposition in Chicago. From ...

Article

Dorothy C. Pratt

(b Constantinople, 1881; d Chamonix, July 27, 1954). Armenian cellist. He studied with Grützmacher and while a student played chamber music with Brahms and Joachim. At the age of 17 he appeared as the soloist in Strauss's Don Quixote with the composer conducting and scored a triumph; he was then invited to play concertos with Nikisch and Mahler. In ...

Article

Dennis Libby and Emanuele Senici

(b Rome, June 29, 1801; d Rome, June 12, 1863). Italian musicologist and composer. Ordained a Roman priest in 1823, his life was entirely directed towards the deliverance of liturgical music from what he saw as the debased theatrical style of contemporary composers and the neglect and incompetence of singers and organists in regard to Gregorian chant and Renaissance music. He contributed most importantly to this goal through his editions, particularly the ...

Article

Jocelyne Aubé

(b Barcelona, March 27, 1862; d Barcelona, March 31, 1908). Spanish composer, folklorist and music critic. He studied composition with Antonio Nicolau and Anselmo Barba and piano with C.G. Vidiella in Barcelona and was music critic for various journals there, including La renaixensa...

Article

John H. Baron

(b Bennington, VT, 1826; d New Orleans, Oct 28, 1888). American music publisher. He worked as a music teacher in Huntsville, Alabama (1845–52), and Jackson, Louisiana (1852–5). In 1858 he joined E.D. Patton’s music shop in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which he bought out the following year with his younger brother Henry (...

Article

Donald W. Krummel

(b England, 1775; d Philadelphia, Feb 20, 1871). American music engraver and publisher. He emigrated to the USA before 1793 and in 1794 began teaching the flute and clarinet. In 1802 he acquired the piano manufactory of John I. Hawkins in Philadelphia, and soon after began to publish and to operate a circulating music library. His production included many American compositions (...

Article

See Pazdírek family

Article

Marie Cornaz

(d Brussels, May 4, 1776). Flemish bookseller and music printer. He was the principal music seller in Brussels from 1745 to 1770. As the official printer for the Théâtre de la Monnaie he printed librettos for opéras-comiques and comédies mêlées d'ariettes performed there by composers such as Duni, Monsigny and Philidor, some with a musical supplement. His publications were covered at first by a privilege of impression and sale (...

Article

Anik Devriès

(d after 1807). French music publisher. He was an écuyer du Roi when he married Marie-Rose-Jeanne Le Menu in February 1775. In January 1778 Boyer’s wife went into partnership with her mother, Madame Le Menu, in their music publishing business under the name of ‘A la Clé d’Or’, in the rue du Roule in Paris. The firm had been founded by Christophe ...

Article

J.H. Alexander

(b Lempster, NH, Feb 14, 1814; d Cleveland, OH, April 8, 1871). American music publisher. He moved to Cleveland in 1834 and with Henry J. Mould opened a music shop, Brainard and Mould, two years later. By 1845 the company was known as S. Brainard and in that year began to publish music; this business (known as S. Brainard & Sons from ...

Article

Alexander Weinmann

(fl c1790–1830). Austrian music publisher, nephew of Giovanni Cappi. Through his uncle’s influence he was engaged by the firm Artaria in Vienna in 1793. He was subsequently a partner of the new firm Giovanni Cappi (1801–5), and then of Artaria. On ...

Article

David L. Crouse and David W. Music

(b Tennessee, Oct 13, 1792; d Franklin, TN, Oct 18, 1859). American singing-school teacher and tunebook compiler. Nothing is known of his early activities or training, but by 1817 Carden was an established singing-school teacher in the Tennessee area. He taught a singing school in St. Louis, Missouri, in ...

Article

W.H. Husk, Frank Kidson and Peter Ward Jones

(b 1798; d London, April 7, 1887). English music publisher. He established his own firm in London in 1823. In 1868 he took his two sons Arthur and Stroud into partnership and retired in 1881, but at his death his grandson Robert M. Cocks became the proprietor and continued until his retirement in ...

Article

Frances Barulich

Firm of music and book publishers. Concordia Publishing House was founded in St. Louis in 1869 by immigrant German Lutherans for the purpose of printing their hymnals and other church literature, and takes its name from the Lutheran Book of Concord (1580). Its catalog, which has included music since ...

Article

Stefano Ajani

(b Naples, Dec 7, 1827; d Naples, March 30, 1879). Italian music publisher, lawyer, poet, writer and politician. He studied the piano with F. Festa, composition with Salvatore Pappalardo and also learnt some music from his father, Guglielmo Cottrau (b Paris, 9 Aug 1797...

Article

W.H. Husk, David Johnson and Kenneth Elliott

(b Aberdeen, Oct 27, 1800; d Georgetown, British Guiana [now Guyana], July 28, 1843). Scottish musical scholar. The son of William Dauney of Falmouth, Jamaica, he was educated at Dulwich College, London, and at Edinburgh University. He was called to the Scottish Bar in ...

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b 1800–01; d London, July 4, 1875). English music printer and publisher in London. He is first known as a general printer from about 1833. He began to publish both literary and musical works about 1844 and in 1847–8 he issued the two volumes of ...

Article

Alexander Weinmann and John Warrack

(b Mattsee, nr Salzburg, Sept 5, 1781; d Vienna, April 7, 1858). Austrian publisher and composer. He studied music in Michaelbeuren and Salzburg and in 1800 entered Raitenhaslach Abbey. After the dissolution of the Bavarian monasteries (1803) he went to Vienna, where he taught the piano and guitar, and soon became known for his arrangements and compositions (six masses by him had been published in Augsburg in ...

Article

Dreyfus  

Max Dreyfus (1874–1964) and his brother Louis Dreyfus (1877–1967), music publishers, were directors of the firms of Harms and Chappell .

Article

See Hoffmann family