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Institution of higher education in Providence , Rhode Island, founded in 1764 as Rhode Island College (see also Libraries and collections).

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University founded in Washington, DC, in 1887, with a music department from 1950; see Washington, DC.

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Romanian orchestra founded in 1868 in Bucharest. Previously known as the Romanian Philharmonic Society Orchestra, since 1955 it has borne the name of Romania’s most prominent composer, George Enescu. It is the oldest orchestra in Eastern Europe and its headquarters is the Palace of the Romanian Athenaeum, a concert hall with a capacity of 800, and a symbol of Bucharest’s cultural richness....

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Private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. See Boston (i) ; see also Libraries and collections. For details of the Harvard Musical Association see Boston (i) .

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University founded in Washington, DC, in 1867, with a music department from 1913; see Washington, DC.

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Music conservatory established with private donations in New York in 1885 by Jeannette Meyer Thurber. Although intended as a national institution, the only federal contribution was $200,000 in 1891. antonín Dvořák was director from 1891 to 1895. Influential in its prime, the conservatory quietly closed around ...

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Dena J. Epstein and Karen M. Bryan

(b Florida, NY, 25 Jan 1835; d East, Orange, NJ, 30 Aug 1902). American music educator and editor. Seward studied in Boston with Lowell Mason, george frederick Root, and thomas Hastings. After appointments as organist in New London, Connecticut (1857–9), Rochester, New York (...

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William Brooks and Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Buckland, MA, 14 March 1826; d Dorchester, MA, 14 April 1888). American composer and music educator. He learned music in singing-schools and assemblies conducted by Lowell Mason, george james Webb, and others. He taught briefly in Massachusetts before moving to Hudson, New York, to teach in public schools and at the Claverack Seminary. By ...

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The original name of the Eitz method.

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Romanian university based in Bucharest. It traces its origins to the Music and Declamation Conservatory founded in 1864 during the reign of Prince Alexandru Ioan Cuza. Originally it made efforts to condense and stabilize a coherent artistic education addressed to both musicians and dramatic artists. Its first directors, Alexandru Flechtenmacher, Eduard Wachmann, and Dimitrie Popovici-Bayreuth, directed their efforts to the make-up of the professorial body in order to attract instructors capable of producing musicians and actors of the highest calibre, and to raising the level of education so that it equalled that of other, comparable European music educational institutions. The school’s activities at the beginning of the 20th century focused on optimizing the educational process, widening the areas of specialization (from piano, violin, and harmony to composition and choral and orchestral studies). In ...