1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • Musical Form x
  • Late 18th c./Classical (1750-1800) x
Clear all

Article

Jan Larue and Eugene K. Wolf

In 

See Symphony

Article

Mark Evan Bonds

In 

See Symphony

Article

Jan Larue, Eugene K. Wolf, Mark Evan Bonds, Stephen Walsh and Charles Wilson

In 

See Symphony

Article

( b 1762; d 1821). American Moravian violinist and composer . See Moravians, music of the, §3 .

Article

Nicholas Temperley

A piece of music of moderate length, either introducing a dramatic work or intended for concert performance. See also French overture.

The word ‘overture’ derives from the French ouverture, which denoted the piece in two or more sections that formed a solemn introduction to a ballet, opera or oratorio in the 17th century. (It was sometimes applied, notably by Bach, to a suite comprising a French overture and a group of dance movements.) In 18th-century usage it was extended to works of the symphony type, whether or not they were preludes to dramatic works; the terms were often used interchangeably. Thus in the 1790s Haydn’s London symphonies were sometimes billed as ‘overtures’....

Article

Nicholas Temperley

(b Dec 1738, bap. London, Jan 1, 1739; d Boston, early Dec 1798). English organist and composer. He was organist of All Hallows Bread Street (1756–73), joint organist of St Sepulchre’s, Holborn (1760–73), and organist to the Magdalen Hospital (...

Article

Jan Larue, Eugene K. Wolf, Mark Evan Bonds, Stephen Walsh and Charles Wilson

A term now normally taken to signify an extended work for orchestra. The symphony became the chief vehicle of orchestral music in the late 18th century, and from the time of Beethoven came to be regarded as its highest and most exalted form. The adjective ‘symphonic’ applied to a work implies that it is extended and thoroughly developed....

Article

(b 1751; d 1831). American Moravian composer. See Moravians, music of the, §3.