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A waltz variation that first appeared in American ballrooms during the late 1860s. Each step to the dance was accompanied by a considerable bend of the knees, causing the entire body to sink down (the Boston “dip”).

See Waltz .

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Robert Stevenson

(b Villena, nr Alicante, March 27, 1851; d Madrid, March 25, 1909). Spanish composer. In 1865 he conducted the band in his home village, where his father, an enthusiastic music-lover, was a barber. Two years later Chapí enrolled in the Madrid Conservatory, studying with Arrieta and winning first prize in harmony in ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Palmyra, NY, Nov 6, 1827; d New York, May 12, 1868). American minstrel performer. He changed his family name of Harrington after joining (as a jig dancer) the troupe of his stepfather, Edwin Pearce Christy, at Buffalo in 1842. He appeared with Christy’s Minstrels in New York from ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Madrid, May 5, 1846; d Madrid, July 20, 1908). Spanish composer. He studied elementary piano and theory at the Madrid Conservatory, but then, at his parents' insistence, turned to medicine. However, Barbieri brought him back to a musical career when he conducted a set of Chueca's waltzes, ...

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Andrew Lamb

(b Szepesvárallya [now Spišská Nová Ves, Slovakia], May 14, 1842; d Vienna, Oct 27, 1894). Hungarian composer. At the age of 15 he was performing as a pianist in Russia; then he became a music teacher, and later a conductor in Wiener Neustadt (...

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Orly Leah Krasner

(b Middletown, CT, April 3, 1859; d Chicago, Jan 16, 1920). American composer. In 1872 he went to England and in 1880 took the BA in modern history from Oxford University. He had studied the piano with Wilhelm Speidel at Stuttgart and after graduating returned there to study the piano and harmony with Siegmund Lebert and Dionys Pruckner. He pursued further theory studies with J.C. Hauff at Frankfurt, and learnt singing with Luigi Vannuccini at Florence and composition with Richard Genée at Vienna. In ...

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Andrew Lamb

(b Graslitz [now Kraslice], Bohemia, July 8, 1857; d Dresden, Sept 24, 1910). German composer and conductor. The son of a woodwind instrument maker, he attended the music school in Graslitz for three years and then (1874 to 1879) studied the clarinet with Julius Pisařowitz at the Prague Conservatory. In ...

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Robert B. Winans

(b 1808; d New Orleans, 1861). American minstrel performer. He was most famous for his entr’acte performances of Coal Black Rose, the first blackface comic lovesong, and Long Tailed Blue, the first song of the black dandy; both of these song types later became standard in the minstrel show, and both songs are in a simple musical style that was thought (mistakenly) to represent African American music. Dixon claimed authorship of these songs (and, less credibly, of ...

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(b Terre Haute, IN, April 22, 1858; d New York, Jan 30, 1906). American songwriter, lyricist, publisher and performer. He was the brother of the novelist Theodore Dreiser. He learned the guitar and piano, and at the age of 16 joined a travelling show, adopting the pseudonym Dresser. From ...

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(b Vienna, Oct 20, 1853; d New York, Sept 13, 1914). American composer and conductor of Austrian birth. He received his musical education in his native city, where he reportedly studied with Jacques Offenbach. He emigrated to the USA in 1882, became conductor at the Thalia Theatre, New York, and began arranging other composers’ works. His own first published score was ...

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Andrew Lamb

(b Vienna, Oct 25, 1815; d Vienna, March 31, 1885). Austrian composer and bandmaster. In 1825 he joined the newly formed orchestra of Johann Strauss the elder, and he worked closely with Strauss on the preparation of the latter's works. He formed his own orchestra in ...

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Andrew Lamb

(b Hamburg, Feb 16, 1854; d Hamburg, Jan 11, 1931). German conductor and composer. The son of a journalist, he was educated in Hamburg and studied music with August Herzog (1870–72). He began a career in business, but from 1880 was active as conductor and composer of waltzes, polkas, and other dances and marches. His waltz ...

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Deane L. Root

(b Lawrenceville, now part of Pittsburgh, July 4, 1826; d New York, Jan 13, 1864). American songwriter of Scots-Irish descent.

He was born the ninth child of William Barclay Foster, a businessman and sometime politician, and Eliza Clayland Tomlinson. Though neither parent was musical, their daughters' education in voice and piano and Mrs Foster's subscriptions to literary magazines brought music and poetry into the home. The details of his life and career are sketchy. His first biography, an introduction to a collected edition of his songs, written by his brother Morrison (...

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Andrew Lamb

(b Cloonyquin, Co. Roscommon, May 1, 1854; d Formby, Jan 24, 1920). Irish singer and songwriter. He studied at Trinity College, Dublin (1872–80), and had a career in engineering, but in 1890 turned to writing and performing. His shows included story-telling, humorous sketching and singing, sometimes accompanied on the banjo. He moved to London in about ...

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Andrew Lamb

(b Prague, July 18, 1872; d Berlin, Sept 25, 1916). Czech bandmaster and composer. From 1885 to 1891 he studied at the Prague Conservatory with Bennewitz (violin), Milde (bassoon) and Dvořák (composition), and from 1891 to 1894 he played under J.F. Wagner in the band of the 49th Austro-Hungarian Regiment stationed at Krems. Afterwards he returned to Prague, playing the bassoon at the German Theatre and later in the symphony orchestra of the National Ethnographic Exhibition, and also playing in the Czech Wind Trio. He joined the orchestra at the National Theatre at Zagreb in ...

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J.G. Prod’homme and Andrew Lamb

(b Buxières-les-Mines, April 5, 1862; d Paris, July 14, 1923). French composer and conductor. He was a pupil of Dubois and Franck at the Conservatoire, where he won a first prize in harmony and an organ prize. He made his début as a composer with a ballet-divertissement, ...

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(b Tudela, Feb 7, 1822; d Madrid, March 18, 1870). Spanish composer and conductor. Orphaned at an early age, he became a choirboy at Tudela Cathedral in 1830 and studied there with Rubla. In 1834 he was a pupil of Guelbenzu at Pamplona and in ...

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Alfred Loewenberg and Andrew Lamb

(b Danzig [Gdańsk], Feb 7, 1823; d Baden, nr Vienna, June 15, 1895). German conductor, librettist and composer. He was the son of Friedrich Genée (b Königsberg, 1796; d Berlin, 1859), conductor at a theatre in Danzig, and, although first intended for the medical profession, took up music, studying with A. Stahlknecht in Berlin. Between ...

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