1-20 of 81 results  for:

  • Popular Music x
  • 19th c. /Romantic (1800-1900) x
Clear all

Article

Alan Lewis

Mixed troupe of popular vocalists and bell ringers. Organized at New York City in 1846 and billed early as the “Alleghanians, or American Singers,” the group, usually a quartet, toured widely from 1847. Members at that time included James M. Boulard (bass), Richard Dunning (tenor), Carrie Hiffert (contralto), and William H. Oakley (alto). From the start, comparisons to the Rainer and Hutchinson family troupes were common. Miriam G. Goodenow, a young soprano, replaced Hiffert, evidently in ...

Article

Charles Garrett

(b Wenona, IL, March 8, 1893; d New York, NY, July 31, 1962). American Pianist, best known for his work in a duo with phil w. Ohman .

Article

Baker  

Dale Cockrell

Family of singers who between 1844 and the 1880s formed various differently constituted groups under the family name. A vocal quartet named the Baker Family was first formed around 1844 and consisted of by siblings John C. Baker, George E. Baker, Sophia M. Baker, and Henry F. Baker in Salisbury, New Hampshire. They followed the example of the Hutchinson Family in style, repertory, and presentation, and became one of the most popular ensembles of this type. The group, sometimes with the addition of other family members including Jaspar and Emilie, toured widely in the mid- and late 1840s, especially to smaller cities and towns. In ...

Article

Dale Cockrell

(b Cleveland, OH, July 21, 1878; d Santa Ana, CA, May 3, 1927). American composer and singer. After studying music at the Cleveland Conservatory he went to New York, where he became a pianist in vaudeville theaters and a founding member of ASCAP. From ...

Article

John L. Clark

(b New Orleans, LA, March 25, 1897; d New Orleans, Jan 28, 1983). American pianist, singer, and bandleader. The daughter of the Civil War veteran and Louisiana state senator W.B. Barrett, she learned piano by ear as a child and was playing professionally by her early teens. She never learned to read music and worked almost exclusively in New Orleans. During the 1920s Barrett played with many of the uptown New Orleans groups, including those led by Papa Celestin, Armand Piron, and John Robichaux. In the following decade she worked most often with Bebe Ridgley, with whom she developed a local following that subsequently brought her success at the Happy Landing from ...

Article

Sandra Jean Graham

(b Baltimore, MD, 20/Nov 30, 1820/1823; d Philadelphia, PA, June 4, 1874). American minstrel. His stage debut was in Philadelphia c1837. By spring 1840 he had teamed with dan Emmett , singing and dancing in blackface for the Cincinnati Circus Company. In ...

Article

John Lilly

Country music recording artists, singers, musicians, and songwriters. Its original members were A.P. Carter (Alvin Pleasant Carter; b Maces Spring, VA, Dec 15, 1891; d Maces Spring, VA, Nov 7, 1960), his wife Sara Dougherty Carter [Bays] (née Sara Dougherty; later Sara Bays; b...

Article

Whitney B. Holley

(b New York, NY, Aug 15, 1892; d Los Angeles, CA, Aug 29, 1972). American lyricist, dancer, and comedian. He began his career as a dancer and comedian on the vaudeville circuit and became a Tin Pan Alley lyricist. From Shirley Temple’s innocent banter to Billie Holiday’s sensual musings, Clare had a knack for fitting lyrics perfectly to a performer’s character. “Ma, he’s makin’ eyes at me” (...

Article

Phyllis Bruce and Joanna R. Smolko

Male quartet. It was formed in 1853 in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, by four singers from Connecticut: William Dwight Franklin, John Wesleyan Smith, William Frisbie, and Charles Huntington. Three of them had met at the Boston Teachers Institute, where they studied with Lowell Mason, George J. Webb, and George F. Root. John A. Sterry began as the group’s conductor and manager, although at some time Franklin became its leader. In ...

Article

Dale Cockrell

(b New York, NY, May 14, 1840; d New York, NY, Sept 26, 1927). American lyricist. He studied law, but abandoned his career on account of the Civil War, in which he served briefly. His love of popular music led him to work with ...

Article

Robert B. Winans

(b Pawtucket, RI, July 27, 1829; d New York, NY, Feb 14, 1908). American minstrel performer. He ran away from home to join a circus in 1845, and first gained prominence with Matt Peel’s Minstrels in the mid-1850s, when he was a great success in the blackface role of “Old Bob Ridley,” performing the song of the same name. He became particularly noted for his impersonations of older black men. He achieved great fame as a minstrel performer in the 1860s and 1870s, sometimes in companies bearing his own name, and worked primarily in New York, San Francisco, and Chicago. Toward the end of his career, he played character parts in popular plays, including ...

Article

William Brooks

(b New York, NY, Nov 7, 1847; d Boston, MA, Sept 25, 1924). American entertainer. She was guided by her mother throughout her career, which began in California, where from 1853 she learned singing and dancing from local entertainers. She toured mining towns in Mart Taylor’s company from ...

Article

Mel R. Wilhoit

(b South East, Putnam Co., NY, March 24, 1820; d Bridgeport, CT, Feb 12, 1915). American poet and writer of gospel hymn texts. She was blind from the age of six weeks, and was educated and later taught at the New York Institution for the Blind; she married Alexander Van Alstyne, also a teacher at the school, in ...

Article

William J. Schafer

(b Leavenworth, KS, April 12, 1878; d Los Angeles, CA, Jan 23, 1943). American songwriter and music publisher. He had popular success early in his career with the two-step “Margery” (1898), the song “You tell me your dream” (1899), and “Hiawatha” (...

Article

Christopher A. Reynolds

(b Mount Pulaski, IL, Sept 26, 1894; d Buffalo, NY, May 28, 1943). American singer, songwriter, and entertainer. She was one of the first women to broadcast on radio (1920), to appear on television (1939), and to manage a radio station (WDT in New York, ...

Article

Gerald Bordman and Jonas Westover

(b New York, NY, Sept 8, 1896; d New York, NY, July 30, 1983). American lyricist and librettist. He studied at Columbia University, where he was a contemporary of Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II, and served in the US Navy before becoming director of publicity and advertising in ...

Article

Robert B. Winans and Jonas Westover

(b Hartford, CT, Aug 7, 1856; d New York, NY, Oct 26, 1924). American minstrel performer and manager. He began his career as an amateur in Hartford in 1873, where he performed as a blackface song and dance man; he appeared with prominent minstrel organizations and with his own troupes. Between ...

Article

Charles E. Kinzer

(b New Orleans, LA, April 12, 1892; d Chicago, IL, Aug 8, 1940). American jazz clarinetist and bandleader, brother of Baby Dodds. He was raised in a mixed neighborhood in uptown New Orleans, where his father played fiddle and his mother played Baptist hymns on a reed organ as the family sang. Following his mother’s death in ...

Article

Ed Wynn  

Jonas Westover

(b Philadelphia, PA, Nov 9, 1886; d Beverly Hills, CA, June 19, 1966). American actor, comedian, composer, and lyricist. Best known for his character “The Perfect Fool,” Wynn created his stage moniker from his middle name, Edwin. He began his stage career in vaudeville and quickly moved into larger stage productions. Especially important were his starring roles in Florenz Ziegfeld’s ...

Article

Ian Whitcomb

(b Hohensalza [now Inowrocław, Poland], Aug 18, 1879; d Los Angeles, CA, Nov 7, 1945). American singer, songwriter, and impresario. His family immigrated to the United States in the 1880s. By the age of 14 Edwards was working as a singer in Tony Pastor’s Music Hall in New York, and he subsequently appeared as a vaudeville performer with four other boys in an act called the Newsboy Quintet. In ...