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(b Paris, July 4, 1694; d Paris, June 15, 1772). French organist, harpsichordist and composer. Descended from a family of intellectuals of Jewish origin, the son of Claude Daquin and Anne Treisant, Louis-Claude was an infant prodigy. After taking some harpsichord lessons from his godmother Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre, and composition lessons from Nicolas Bernier, he was capable of playing before Louis XIV at the age of six and of conducting his own ...

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Winton Dean

(d 1773). French soprano. Trained in Italy, she sang in several operas at Florence in 1731 and 1734–5. In 1736 she was engaged by the Opera of the Nobility for London, making her King’s Theatre début in Hasse’s Siroe, and singing in operas by Broschi, Pescetti, Veracini and Duni. The following season (...

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Winton Dean

(fl 1737–53). English soprano and actress. A pupil or protégée of Kitty Clive, she appeared first as a child in a pantomime at Drury Lane (1737) and was principally associated with that theatre until 1748. She had two seasons with Handel: ...

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Frank Dobbins

(fl Paris, 1690–1719/20). French music dealer and publisher. It is not known whether he was related to earlier publishers with the same family name, none of whom was apparently involved in music printing. Like other 18th-century music dealers, Henri Foucault was associated with the corporation of haberdashers and jewellers rather than that of the booksellers. He was originally a paper seller, with a shop ‘A la règle d’or’, rue St Honoré, but seems to have branched out from this trade by ...

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Winton Dean

(b London, Sept 7, 1731; d London, Feb 9, 1765). Soprano and composer of Italian descent. She was a daughter of Charles Gambarini, counsellor to the Landgrave of Hessen-Kassel. She took the second soprano part at the first performance of Handel’s Occasional Oratorio...

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Elizabeth Roche

(b 1694; d 1763). German composer. His one surviving publication, Alauda coelestis (Augsburg, 1750), contains six masses which are typical of much church music being published in the mid-18th century, when such music was becoming rather more elaborate than had been usual in the 1720s and 30s. There are also some manuscsript instrumental pieces, some of them scored with the participation of unusual instruments like hurdy-gurdy or jew’s harp as the middle part of the score. An account of his career is given in W. Senn: ‘Der Innsbrucker Hofmusiker Johann Heinrich Hörmann’, ...

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Mary Térey-Smith

(b Rio de Janeiro, March 8, 1705; d Lisbon, Oct 18, 1739). Portuguese playwright of Brazilian birth . After his Jewish parents were arrested by the Inquisition in 1712 he was taken by relatives to Lisbon, where he grew up. Despite constant surveillance by the clergy he completed his studies at Coimbra University and became a respected lawyer, as well as engaging in literary and theatrical activities. In ...

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Eric Werner and Don Harrán

(b Venice, c1700; d Venice, 1771). Italian theorist. He may originally have been Jewish, though apostatized, eventually becoming a monk in the Franciscan order. As a scholar of Hebrew and other ancient languages, he was well qualified to compile and edit a vast anthology of writings, mainly by 17th- and 18th-century Christian authors, including himself, on Jewish antiquities, named ...