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London society, founded in 1726 as the Academy of Vocal Music. See London, §V, 2.

Article

Michelle Fillion

A term used to describe 18th-century chamber music with a substantially or fully written-out keyboard part and one or more accompanying instrumental parts. 18th-century sources most often designated these works by such terms as sonata, trio, terzetto, or divertimento for harpsichord or, simply, keyboard (later with the option of fortepiano), ‘with the accompaniment of’ or ‘that can be played with’ a violin (or flute), with or without cello. The accompanying parts could also be optional (...

Article

Guitar notation in which chords are symbolized by letters of the alphabet. See Guitar, §4 and Tablature, §4.

Colonna, Giovanni Ambrosio

Guitar, §4: The five-course guitar

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C. Matthew Balensuela

This article focusses on anonymous music theory texts within the following categories: works written during the Western Middle Ages and early Renaissance (to about 1600), currently assumed to be anonymous and not closely associated with a known person, which have been edited and published in modern times....

Article

Sydney Robinson Charles

A printed or manuscript collection of musical works selected from a particular repertory. Most anthologies contain works by more than one composer. Certain types of collection, which may be anthologies in the broadest sense – folksong collections, tune books, songsters, hymnals, psalters, pasticcios, ballad operas, organ and lute intabulations, and theory or performance manuals with music examples – are not considered in this article, which is confined to printed anthologies of music roughly contemporary with date of publication and containing works by different composers. For manuscript anthologies, ...

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[ I-AO 15]. See Sources, MS, §IX, 2.

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( D-LEu 1494). See Sources, MS, §IX, 6 and Sources of instrumental ensemble music to 1630, §4 .

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(F–APT 16bis). See Sources, MS, §VII, 3 .

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François Lesure, Roger Bowers, Barbara H. Haggh and André Vanrie

Archival documents contain accurate and detailed information relevant to many aspects of musical scholarship: to biography, chronology, history of institutions and societies, the place and function of musicians in society, performing practice (in the fullest sense of that phrase) and many others. They yield the kind of information that primarily musical manuscripts and printed sources cannot provide....

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( F-Pa 5198). See Sources, MS, §III, 4 .