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A word used in the 17th century (along with the more common Sinfonia ) to denote an orchestral piece, usually an introduction to an opera, a suite or a cantata. For further information see Symphony .

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Thurston Dart

Reviser John Morehen and Richard Rastall

A score in which the voice-parts are ‘tabulated’ or written so that the eye can encompass them. In practice, scores in staff notation with one voice-part per staff are not usually called tablatures unless they are for a solo keyboard instrument (see §2(v) below). The term is more often used for a condensed score in which two or more voice-parts are written or printed on a single staff or comparable area of the page, although when this consists entirely of staff notation it is more often called ‘keyboard score’ or (for concerted music) ‘short score’. The common use of the term ‘tablature’ therefore excludes these; the following article thus discusses any notational system of the last 700 years that uses letters, numbers or other signs as an alternative to conventional staff notation. Such systems were chiefly used for instrumental music; dance tablatures are beyond the scope of this article. For a discussion of tablature in its historical context, ...

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See Sources, MS

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See Sources, MS

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See Sources, MS

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See Sources, MS

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See Sources, MS

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See Sources, MS

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Laurence Libin and Arnold Myers

In 

See Instruments, collections of

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Barry S. Brook

A thematic catalogue is an index to a group of musical compositions that incorporates citations of their opening notes (incipits), or principal melodic features (themes), or both. These citations may be given in various forms, such as conventional notes, neumes, tablatures, syllables, numbers, letters or computer codes....

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( GB-Cfm 52.d.25). See Sources of keyboard music to 1660, §2, (vi).

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Nigel Simeone and David A. Threasher

In 

See Congress reports

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A 17th-century term, like Tuck, tucket and toccata, for a fanfare or flourish of trumpets.

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(F-SERRANT). See Sources, MS, §VII, 1.

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( I-TRmp 87–92; TRcap , called Trent 93). See Sources, MS, §IX, 2.

Hymn, §III, 1: Polyphonic Latin: 15th century

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( GB-Ctc 0.3.58). See Sources, MS, §IX, 4.

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( CH-SGs 463). See Tschudi [Tschudy, Scudus], Aegidius, and Sources, MS, §IX, 11.

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(GB–Ckc Rowe 2). See Sources of lute music, §7.

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Rita Benton

In 

See Libraries

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Urtext  

Stanley Boorman

A term used in studying and editing musical sources to signify the earliest version of the text of any composition, musical or otherwise, a version that is usually no longer extant; it is also used to signify a modern edition of earlier music which purports to present the original text, without editorial addition or emendation. (...