3,161-3,180 of 57,904 results

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New York concert hall opened in 1962; it was known as the Philharmonic Hall until 1973 and is part of Lincoln Center. See New York, §3.

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Guy Oldham

(b Stroud, Gloucs., England, c1755; d London, England, bur. April 29, 1807). English organ builder. His burial record reports his age as 52 years; he might have been a son of a John Avery of Stroud (bap. 3 Jan 1738), with whom he seems to have been confused by historians. His premises in London were at one time in St Margaret’s Church Yard, Westminster. At the time of his death the organ that he had built for Carlisle Cathedral was being installed. Despite his reputation as an excellent builder whose organs were noted for tonal delicacy, he suffered from drunkenness and financial difficulties; he died in debtors’ prison. Organs he built or worked on include those at Gloucester Cathedral (...

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David C. Wickens

(b ?Avening, 1737/55; bur. London, April 29, 1807). English organ builder. Rigby has suggested that the John Avery baptized at Avening, about 5 miles from Stroud, on 3 January 1738 was the organ builder; the record of his burial at Holy Sepulchre without Newgate, London, however, gives his age as 52, making his probable date of birth ...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(b Fairfield, CA, July 2, 1973). American tenor saxophonist. He began playing guitar at the age of ten and had taken up saxophone by the time he was 13. He performed in Donald Bailey’s jazz workshops, studied privately with Joe Henderson, and sat in with visiting musicians around the San Francisco Bay area, notably Art Blakey. In Boston he attended the Berklee College of Music, where he studied with Billy Pierce and George Garzone and performed locally; he graduated in ...

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Paul R. Laird

(b New York, NY, Dec 26, 1937). American dancer, choreographer, producer, and director. After simultaneous study at Boston University and the Boston School of Ballet, Avian appeared in a touring production of West Side Story. He met MICHAEL BENNETT during the show’s European tour; they became friends and long-time artistic and business partners. Avian was in ...

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(b Tonnedorf, nr Erfurt; d Eisenberg, nr Gera, Jan 22, 1617). German writer on music, composer and schoolmaster. In 1579 he was teaching at the Lateinschule at Ronneburg, near Gera, and in 1591 he was Rektor of the Lateinschule at Gera. Later he was a preacher at Bernsdorf, near Torgau, at Munich and at Krossen, near Gera, and from ...

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John C.G. Waterhouse

Opera in three acts by Francesco Balilla Pratella to his own libretto; Lugo di Romagna, Teatro Comunale Rossini, 4 September 1920.

Although Pratella was the one trained musician to sign the first few futurist manifestos, this most famous of his operas (composed 1911–14) only incidentally celebrates the machine age: basically it is a naive symbolic drama about escape from the flesh into pure spirit. Dro (tenor) becomes disgusted with the decadent sensuality that surrounds him: he therefore seeks refuge by the sea, and then flies upwards, in a primitive monoplane, towards ‘that other, inverted sea, even deeper and more limitless’. The plane crashes almost at once; but Dro expires only gradually, beside its shattered remains, serenely identifying himself with the sky above him....

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(b Stanislav, Jan 6, 1908; d Tel-Aviv, Aug 5, 1995). Israeli composer of Russian birth. His mother was a cousin of Mahler; his adopted surname combines the word ‘Avi’ (‘father of’) with the initials of his children's names. He studied at the American University in Beirut and at the Paris Conservatoire, where his teachers included Rabaud. In ...

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Avignon  

Marcel Frémiot and Charles Pitt

City in France, capital of the prefecture of the Vaucluse département. Roman chant was introduced to Avignon at the end of the 7th century by the monks of Lérins, who were summoned there by Bishop Agricol. Of the troubadours, only two songs have survived, one by Bertran Folco d'Avigno and one by Raimon d'Avigno. A university was founded in ...

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(b Portalegre; d Granada, between 13 Sept and Oct 25, 1630). Portuguese composer. He was a choirboy at Portalegre Cathedral, where according to Barbosa Machado he studied with António Ferro. By 1601 he was maestro de capilla at Úbeda. Early that year he tried for a similar post at the royal chapel at nearby Granada but did not secure it until two years later; he was inducted on ...

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Panpipe of the Aweti Kamayurá people of the upper Xingú river area of the Mato Grosso, Brazil. It has four or five reed pipes, up to 50 cm long. Players graduate from these to the larger uruá flutes. The Kamayurá also have a flute call ...

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Carole Pegg

(b 1936, Hovd, west Mongolia; d Aug 1998). Altai Urianghai Mongol epic bard (tuul'ch). Avirmed performed in the deep declamatory häälah vocal style and accompanied himself on the two-string plucked lute, Topshuur Although born after the communist revolution in Mongolia, Avirmed inherited this traditional vocal style and associated folk-religious beliefs (...

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Collection of music issued by the Society of British Composers.

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Norris L. Stephens

(b Newcastle upon Tyne, bap. 16 Feb 1709; d Newcastle upon Tyne, 9/10 May 1770). English composer, conductor, writer on music and organist. He was the most important English concerto composer of the 18th century and an original and influential writer on music....

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Charles Barber

(b Vancouver, April 25, 1917; d Vancouver, Nov 30, 1983). Canadian conductor, broadcaster and accompanist. After studying the piano privately, he took degrees at the universities of British Columbia (1935) and Washington (1936), and subsequently studied at the Juilliard School of Music (...

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Christoph Timpe

(b Naples, ?1670; d Naples, March 19, 1756). Italian composer and violinist. He came from a musical family and was a member of the Neapolitan court orchestra from the late 1690s until his death. His two sets of sonate da chiesa (opp.1 and 2) are notable for their fugal movements, in which the violone shares the counterpoint with the violins, while the continuo remains independent. This principle is systematized in his op.3, which in its instrumentation is based on a model established in Naples at the end of the 17th century by composers such as Pietro Marchitelli and Giancarlo Cailò. In each sonata a brilliant first movement is followed by a three-part fugue, which is separated from a lively closing dance by a short, lyrical movement, usually in 3/2. Avitrano's works show a highly developed sense of tonal effect, particularly his op.3, in which the violins are independent of each other and often complement each other by playing in the same register. Although his violin music does not require technical brilliance from the players, it does demand a sound mastery of the bow, especially in the dance movements. His capacity for invention is limited, particularly in the slow movements, in which the thematic material is often similar to that in other slow movements of his. His harmonic development is conventional but lively. Avitrano's importance lies in his contribution to the four-part sonata, the leading genre in Neapolitan violin music....

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Eliyahu Schleifer

(b Jerusalem, Sept 15, 1941). Israeli composer and conductor. He studied at the Rubin Academy of Music (teacher's diploma 1967, BMus 1972) and at the Salzburg Mozarteum (1976). From 1968 to 1973 he served as the director of Renanot, the Institute of Jewish Music, Jerusalem. In ...

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Miri Gerstel

(b Saarbrücken, Sept 2, 1927). Israeli composer of German origin. He studied composition with Erlich, Ben-Haim and Seter, and the piano with Pelleg, graduating from the Israel Academy of Music, Tel-Aviv, in 1958. From 1961 to 1975, Avni served intermittently as the director of the AMLI Central Music Library. Between ...

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(b ? Mainz or Frankfurt; fl 1727–46). German soprano. She sang in the Peruzzi company at Brussels, 1727–8, and was at Hamburg in 1729, where she sang Cleopatra in Handel’s Giulio Cesare and Rodelinda in Telemann’s Flavius Bertaridus. The same year she was engaged by Fortunato Chelleri as a singer at the court of Kassel. The librettos recording her two appearances at the Sporck theatre in Prague during the ...

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Manuel Carlos De Brito

(bap. Lisbon, April 16, 1714; d Lisbon, 1782). Portuguese composer of Italian ancestry. He studied with his father, Pietro Giorgio Avondano, a Genoese violinist of the Portuguese royal chapel and a composer, and himself became a violinist in the same chapel; others of his family were also members. His duties as a court musician included composing the music for the ballets which accompanied the operas. He also played the violin, and at his own house in the Rua da Cruz promoted balls and concerts mainly for the foreign communities. Three collections of minuets written for these balls were published in London, at the expense of the British community in Lisbon. He was a Knight of the Order of Christ, an honour purchased for 480,000 réis, and he also played an important role in the reorganization after the ...