3,181-3,200 of 57,904 results

Article

Colin Timms

(b Viadana, nr Mantua; fl 1641–5). Italian composer and organist. The title-page of his Compieta concertata a cinque voci op.1 (Venice, 1641) describes him as organist of S Nicola, Viadana, and he was still there when he published his only other known music, ...

Article

James L. Jackman and Dale E. Monson

(b Paola, nr Cosenza, 1708; d Naples, Jan 9, 1796). Italian composer. He is often confused with his contemporary Girolamo Abos, several of whose opere serie are sometimes attributed to him. The family is reputed to have been of Spanish origin. His father was in the service of Spinelli, Duke of Fuscaldo, and (according to Mondolfi, ...

Article

Marina Lobanova

(b Malïy Nesvetay, Rostov district, 10/April 22, 1886 (elsewhere 10/12 June 1886); d Moscow, May 19, 1944). Russian composer and theorist. He studied theory at the music school attached to the Moscow Philharmonic Society with I.N. Protopopov and A.M. Koreshchenko (...

Article

Jelena Jovanović

(b Vranje, Serbia, June 11, 1897; d Feb 21, 1969). Serbian singer (pesmopojka) and song writer. She was one of the most prominent performers of the 20th-century Serbian and Balkan urban vocal tradition. Widely known as a veseljak (lively character), she was respected for her fidelity to local traditions, for her intensely expressive and nuanced vocal style, and for her dedication to bring out the meaning of the texts she sang. She started singing at a very early age; as a young girl she was paid for her singing. She sang in her own home on everyday occasions, to guests, and at family and public celebrations. Her repertory encompassed love, family, and narrative songs, mainly concerning specific events, places, and personalities of Vranje. She is the author of the song ‘...

Article

Nicholas Tochka

(b Korça, Albania, March 16, 1915; d Tirana, Albania, Nov 18, 1985). Albanian conductor, composer, and arranger. A major organizer and administrator in state-socialist Albania from the 1940s to the 60s, he received his early training from the pre-war choral and theatre groups active in Korça during the late 1920s and 30s. A talented and precocious youth, Avrazi was named assistant music director in the ensemble Korça Youth (...

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David Stabler

(b Nikolayevsk, Siberia, Oct 31, 1894; d New York, April 26, 1965). Russian composer, father of Jacob Avshalomov. Self-taught except for one term at the Zürich Conservatory, he spent 30 years in China, where he composed symphonic and dramatic works. Fascinated by Chinese culture, he integrated authentic Chinese thematic material into Western musical styles. In addition to composing, he became head librarian of the Municipal Library of Shanghai (...

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David Stabler

(b Qingdao, China, March 28, 1919; d Portland, OR, April 25, 2013). American composer, son of Aaron Avshalomov. After emigrating to the USA in 1937, he studied in Los Angeles with Ernst Toch, at the Eastman School of Music (MA 1942) with Bernard Rogers, among others, and at Tanglewood with Aaron Copland (...

Article

Ghulam-Sarwar Yousof

(b Pasir Mas Kelantan, Malaysia, Aug 13, 1941). ma'yong Malaysian (dance theatre) performer. From an early age she developed an interest in singing, dancing and acting, later participating as a singer and dancer in activities organized by both the regional radio and television stations in Kota Baharu and the Kelantan state cultural troupe, as well as in several performances marking national events in Kuala Lumpur. In the mid-1960s she joined the National Cultural Complex under the Ministry of Culture, Arts and Tourism as a dancer....

Article

Awards  

Jane Gottlieb

Prizes for excellence in music can be loosely divided into two categories: honors, for which an individual must be nominated, and competitive awards, for which he or she must apply or in some other way compete. Some awards, such as medals, citations, or membership in certain organizations, are honorary. Others are monetary gifts in the form of grants, fellowships for particular study programs, commissions, promotional funding (management, concert performances, etc.), and similar kinds of subsidy. The following list of honors and competitive awards is selective and with few exceptions includes only those awards that were made on a regular basis in ...

Article

Hugh Davies

An Electronic organ, several models of which were manufactured between 1951 and the mid-1950s by Apparatewerk Bayern (AWB) in Dachau. The first model was the entertainment organ Polychord III, designed by Harald Bode. It had two five-octave manuals and a 30-note pedalboard. The sounds were produced by an oscillator for each note, and a second system of 12 oscillators, using frequency division, supplied some of the timbres. The Polychord III was one of the first electronic organs manufactured in Germany after World War II; many of its principles were continued in later models of the AWB organ. After Bode left the company at the end of ...

Article

Daniel Avorgbedor

(b Gonder, Ethiopia, 1961). Ethiopian singer. Ashter began her singing career in the early 1970s in Addis Ababa, and performed with the band Roha (formerly Shebele Band). Her formative musical years were also shaped by the music of Bezunesh Bekele and the philanthropy of Ali Tango, which provided motivation for the singer. Ashter emigrated to the USA in ...

Article

Prayers sung by the priest in the Divine Liturgy of the Coptic Orthodox Church. See Coptic church music, §4.

Article

Ax  

Laurence Libin

In the argot of American popular music, a term for any instrument. The word particularly denotes wind and string types common in bands, such as saxophones and electric guitars; it is less often applied to keyboards and drum sets. Of uncertain origin but widespread by the 1950s, this usage apparently emerged in the early 20th century, perhaps in connection with the colloquial terms ‘woodshedding’ (laborious practicing or performing) and ‘chops’ (a wind player’s jaws, mouth, or embouchure, and by extension, any instrumentalist’s technical ability), as in ‘He’s woodshedding with his ax to improve his chops’. ‘Cutting contests’ (performance competitions) between early New Orleans jazz players naturally involved their axes. Such rustic terminology implies effortful, demonstrative physical work, like chopping wood with an ax....

Article

Ax(e)  

Robert Witmer

In jazz argot originally (from about 1950) a saxophone, later any musical instrument. (GoldJL)

Article

James Chute

(b L′viv, June 8, 1949). American pianist of Polish birth. His first teacher was his father, a coach at the L′viv Opera. The family emigrated to Canada in 1959, settling in Winnipeg, then moved to New York in 1961. Ax began seven years of study with Mieczysław Munz at the Juilliard School of Music in ...

Article

Axatse  

Gourd vessel rattle with an external network of small beads or shells. The term was originally used by the Anlo-Ewe people of Ghana but has been adopted by members of syncretist sects.

See also Atsimewu .

Image

Axatse: Fig.1: Axatse. Virtual Instrument Museum, http://www.wesleyan.edu/music/vim

Article

Erik Wiedemann

(b Copenhagen, Aug 12, 1925). Danish pianist. From 1949 to 1958 he played with commercially oriented groups and recorded with such musicians as the baritone saxophonist Max Brüel (1955). He led the group Jazz Quintet ’60 (1959–63) and was a member of the Danish Radiojazzgruppen (i) (...

Article

(b Mariupol, Ukraine, near the north coast of the Sea of Azov, Sept 27, 1875; d Athens, May 16, 1924). Greek composer, critic, and music educator. After the return of his family to Athens in 1887 he studied music privately with Loudovikos Spinellis, and later, in ...

Article

Jan Trojan and Geoffrey Chew

Czech composer and musicologist. He studied at Prague University under Nejedlý and Hostinský, receiving the PhD in 1912 for a dissertation on Moravian folk opera in the 18th century. He studied composition under Novák (1908–10) and counterpoint under Ostrčil (1920), and he devoted himself to composition after his appointment as head of the musical archive at the National Museum in Prague (now the Muzeum české hudby) in ...