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(d ?Seville, before Sept 4, 1504). Spanish maestro de capilla. He may be identifiable with Alonso de Alba.

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William F. Prizer

(b ?Venice, c1460; d Venice, late 1502, or before Feb 6, 1503). Italian composer and organist. He was appointed the first player of the second new organ at S Marco, Venice, in 1490, having previously been organist at S Leonardo there. He held the position at S Marco until shortly before ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b ?Urrestilla, nr Azpeitia, 1462; d Azpeitia, July 30, 1523). Spanish composer. He was the second son of Martín García de Anchieta and Urtayzaga de Loyola (an aunt of Ignatius Loyola) and may have studied at Salamanca University, where the music professor from ...

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(fl Heidelberg, 1511). German composer. He was a colleague of Sebastian Virdung at Heidelberg, and Virdung’s treatise Musica getutscht (1511) is presented as a dialogue between the author and Andreas. The sole source of his music is Glareanus’ Dodecachordon, which includes the Kyrie and Osanna of his ...

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C. Matthew Balensuela

This article focusses on anonymous music theory texts written during the Western Middle Ages and early Renaissance (to about 1600), currently assumed to be anonymous and not closely associated with a known person, which have been edited and published in modern times.

Numerous artefacts of music have survived to modern times without clearly identifying their author. These include musical works, pictures, court records, theoretical treatises, and other documents. The corpus of anonymous theoretical works, therefore, comprises only a portion of all anonymous works in the history of music. In music theory, anonymous sources primarily span the time from antiquity to the early Renaissance, when texts were copied by hand. After the advent of printing, few theoretical works were transmitted anonymously....

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William F. Prizer

(b c1470; d 1524). Sienese composer, singer and priest. Ansanus can now be identified as Sano di Goro, the son of a Sienese wool shearer, who is first recorded as a clerk in the cathedral of Siena in March 1484. He joined the chapel as a chorister in ...

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Cecil Adkins and Bonnie J. Blackburn

(b Parma, before 1386; d c1440–43). Italian scholar and theorist. His many works, covering topics such as astronomy, astrology and medicine, also include a treatise De musica, notable for its influence on Gaffurius. He studied as a youth in Pavia and in about ...

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William F. Prizer

(b ?Padua; fl 1505–14). Italian composer. He is probably identifiable with the ‘Honophrius Patavinus’ of Petrucci’s sixth and eleventh books of frottolas. His frottolas consist of nine barzellette, two ode, a ballata and a strambotto, the last, Se un pone un fragil vetro...

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(fl c1440–70). ?Italian composer. Previously thought to have been English, he is now presumed to have been a native of the Trentino, perhaps identifiable with the nobleman and lawyer Christophorus Anthonii de Molveno, traceable in Trent in 1449–68. His works, comprising a Sanctus, ...

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F. Alberto Gallo and Andreas Bücker

(b ?Leno, nr Brescia; fl 1st half of the 15th century). Italian ?theorist. An incomplete treatise on music, in Italian, found in a manuscript of the second half of the 15th century ( I-Vnm Lat.336, coll.1581, 50v–64r), contains musical examples attributed to ‘Antonius de Leno musichus’; it is uncertain, however, whether the text of the treatise can safely be attributed to him. Only three sections survive: the first, on mutations, may have been the final part of a larger section on ...

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Beatrice Pescerelli

(fl 15th century). Italian theorist. He was a Servite friar and pupil of one Laurentius of Orvieto, a canon of S Maria Maggiore. His treatise Ars cantus figurati (CoussemakerS, iv, 421–33) is a compilation on musica mensurabilis according to the theories of Johannes de Muris; it deals with ligatures, alterations, proportions and prolations, giving diagrams and music examples. The work is discussed in A.M. Busse Berger: ...

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Albert Seay and David Fallows

(fl1400–32). Italian composer. The only secure facts of his life are that he was ‘magister cantus’ at S Marco, Venice, on 3 March 1420 and was listed in a notarial act of 20 July 1425 as a ‘cantor S Marci’. The text of his motet, ...

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(b c1480–88; d after 1558). South Netherlandish composer and singer. The earliest known archival documents mention him in 1518 as a singer and in 1519 as the choirmaster at St Jacob in Bruges. After 1519, contemporary publications by Attaingnant and Moderne are the only source of evidence of his activity until ...

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Clement A. Miller

(b Aachen, c 1492). South Netherlandish composer. He came from the diocese of Liège and studied music under Thomas Tzamen of Aachen. On 23 November 1510 he entered the University of Cologne where he met Heinrich Glarean, who later published Aquanus’s humanistic motet, ...

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Don Harrán

(b Spain, c1420; d Naples, 1494). Rabbi and philosopher. Following the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, he settled in Naples. He referred to music under the heading nigun ‘olam (‘cosmic music’) in chapter 12 of his ‘Aqedat Yits ḥaq...

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Ingrid Brainard

(b Solliès, [now Solliès-Pont, Var], late 15th century; d Saint Rémy, Bouches du Rhône, or Solliès, after 1543). French dance theorist and man of letters. In 1519 he began to study law at the University of Avignon, after completing his studies he joined the French troops that invaded Italy. Late in ...

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Frank A. D’Accone

(b c1450; d Rome, 1508). Italian organist and organ builder. He was the son of the expatriate Greek scholar, Giovanni, who taught Greek philosophy at the Florentine Studio from 1456 to 1471. He studied both organ playing and organ building under Antonio Squarcialupi, who recommended him to Duke Galeazzo Maria Sforza of Milan. He was employed at the duke's court from ...

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John Koster

(b Zwolle, late 14th or early 15th century; d Paris, Sept 6, 1466). Franco-Flemish physician, astrologer, astronomer and author of a treatise on musical instruments, of which he was presumably also a maker. Even if he did not, as has been assumed, study at the University of Paris, he would have become familiar with much of its curriculum through Jean Fusoris, whom Arnaut called his master. Fusoris, who had received degrees in theology, arts and medicine at the University, was a physician, astrologer, astronomer and prolific maker of astronomical and horological devices. By ...

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