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Article

Marie Louise Göllner

(b ?Aachen; d Cologne, c1528–30). German printer. He came into possession of the Lupus Press in Cologne through marriage to its owner, Ida Grutter, and began publishing in 1512 or 1513. He brought out some 35 works on a variety of subjects before his death. The business was continued by his widow and son-in-law, Laurenz von der Mülen, until his son Johann von Aich was old enough to take it over. Under the latter’s direction some 35 more books were issued from the Lupus Press, the last of them dated ...

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(b ?Orzivecchi or Orzinuovi, nr Brescia, c1520; fl 1562–81). Italian theorist and Franciscan friar. He was influenced by Pietro Aaron, to whom he referred as ‘my indisputable teacher’, by Spataro and by Marchetto da Padova. His Illuminata de tutti i tuoni di canto fermo...

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Patrick Macey, Jeremy Noble, Jeffrey Dean and Gustave Reese

In 

See Josquin (Lebloitte dit) des Prez

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Alaire  

Frank Dobbins

(fl 1534–49). French composer. According to Fétis, there was a singer called Allaire at Notre Dame in Paris in April 1547, but the name is not mentioned in Chartier’s study of the maîtrise or in Wright. All the surviving music ascribed to Alaire, one mass and eight chansons, was published in Paris by Attaingnant; none of it was reprinted in any form, although two of the chansons were copied into a manuscript owned by a Bruges merchant. It is unlikely that Alaire can be identified with either of the contemporary Flemish musicians Simon Alard or Jacques Alardy, or with the ‘Alardino’ whose six-voice madrigal ...

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Herbert Kellman

(b Nuremberg, c1470; d Mechelen, June 26, 1536). South Netherlandish music scribe of German birth. He was a member of the Nuremberg merchant family Imhof, but settled in the Netherlands in the early 1490s. He was active principally at the courts of Margaret of Austria, regent of the Netherlands, her successor Mary of Hungary and Emperor Charles V, in Mechelen and Brussels. He was one of several copyists – the others are anonymous – of a complex of more than 60 manuscripts of polyphonic music produced there between about ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b El Espinar, nr Segovia, c1530; d Mexico City, between 17 March and May 19, 1570). Spanish composer, active in Mexico. He served as a choirboy at Segovia Cathedral from 1542 to 1549, where he was taught by Gerónimo de Espinar (who later taught Victoria at Avila) and from ...

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(b Péronne; d St Quentin, c1530–40). Franco-Flemish singer. He is possibly identifiable with the composer Alart.

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(b Nivelles, c1515; d ?Madrid, after 1592). Flemish singer. He is possibly identifiable with the composer Alart.

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Alart  

Jeffrey Dean

(fl c1535–60). Franco-Flemish composer. The name appears in the ascriptions of two works published over 20 years apart. The four-voice motet Dum transisset Sabbatum was rather widely distributed, ascribed consistently to ‘Alart’ without first name or initial (RISM 1539¹³, 1549¹...

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(fl late 15th century or early 16th). Spanish composer. A number of sacred works and at least one song are attributed to this composer in Iberian sources; one work, a four-voice Agnus Dei, bears the ascription ‘Alonso Perez de Alba’. There are two possible candidates who may be identified with this composer....

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Hans-Christian Müller and Hans-Otto Korth

(b Bruchenbrücken, nr Friedberg, before1500; d Neubrandenburg, May 5, 1553). German theologian and hymn writer. Related to the noble house of Reiffenstein, he studied in Mainz about 1517, and in Wittenberg from 1518 to 1520 with Luther, who later became a friend. From ...

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Emilio Ros-Fábregas

(b Vich, 1517; d Barcelona, Nov 16, 1582). Catalan composer and organist. He was the most distinguished member of an extended family of organists; he became organist of Barcelona Cathedral in 1536, thanks to an agreement by which his uncle, Pere Vila (...

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Victor Ravizza and Gary Towne

(b Padua, c1489; d Bergamo, c1560). Italian composer. His entire career was spent at S Maria Maggiore, Bergamo, where he appeared as cleric in 1503, was ordained in 1514, became chaplain in 1515, and was listed as singer in 1517 and ...

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Anthony Newcomb

(b Treviso, c1535; d Ferrara, June 15, 1615). Italian instrumentalist and composer. He came from a family of North Italian musicians that had lived in Treviso since the mid-15th century. His father was the town trumpeter; his uncle and brother were musicians in the courts of Ferrara and Munich respectively. He was one of the three young men brought to the newly founded Accademia degli Elevati in Padua in ...

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Arthur J. Ness

(b Kleve; fl Milan, 1536). German lutenist, viola player and composer, active in Italy. He apparently resided in Milan long enough to acquire the epithet ‘from Milan’ and to be counted among the foremost musicians and composers of that city. His extant music consists of two lute fantasias which first appeared in Giovanni Antonio Casteliono’s ...

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Glenn Watkins and Serena dal Belin Peruffo

(b Novara, c1535; d May 8, 1596). Italian composer and organist. Of a well-to-do family, he travelled widely in his youth. He spent some years in Rome, where he probably completed his studies in theology. He served as parish priest at S Stefano, Novara, and S Giovanni Battista, Milan. After serving from ...

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Martin Staehelin and John Kmetz

(b Baden, 1500; d Berne, 1550). Swiss composer. He attended the school attached to St Vincent’s, Berne, until 1511, and in 1524 became Kantor there. After the Reformation the post was discontinued and Alder held various clerk’s positions in Berne that gave him financial security. In ...

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Isabel Pope and Tess Knighton

(fl 1506–9). Iberian composer. A native of Barcelona, he became maestro de capilla at the cathedral there on 19 January 1506. By 1 March 1508 he was appointed singer in the Aragonese royal chapel of Ferdinand V. He appears to have stayed there less than six months and in summer ...

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(b c1435; d after 1504). Italian philosopher and biblical exegete. He wrote briefly on music in his Ḥesheq shelomoh (‘Solomon's desire’), a commentary on the Song of Solomon, written during the period 1488–92 at the request of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Music is discussed in relation to Hebrew poetics, then classified for its varieties and described for its powers. Under poetics, Alemanno notes that the word ...

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Richard J. Agee

In 

See Gardano family