21-40 of 218 results  for:

  • Musicology and Music History x
Clear all

Article

Lodewijk Muns

(b Nijmegen, Netherlands, Aug 4, 1812; d Delft, Netherlands, Nov 1, 1896). Dutch musician, music historian, and instrument collector. The son of a musician and instrument seller, he studied flute and violin at the conservatory of The Hague. After positions as an orchestra musician in the Court Chapel and the French Opera of The Hague, with the Casino Paganini in Paris, and as a conductor at the opera of Metz, he returned in ...

Article

[F-Pn Rés.Vma.851]. See Sources, MS, §IX, 9 and Sources of instrumental ensemble music to 1630, §2.

Article

( D-Mbs Mus.3725; also Cim.352b). See Sources of keyboard music to 1660, §2, (iii).

Article

( GB-Cu Gonville and Caius Coll.667/760). See Sources, MS, §IX, 19.

Article

( E-SC , s.s.). 12th-century manuscript; see Sources, MS, §IV, 3.

Article

( GB-Cu Gg.5.35). See Sources, MS, §III, 2.

Article

( E-Sc 7-1-28). See Sources, MS, §IX, 10.

Article

( E-Mp II-1335). See Sources, MS, §IX, 10.

Article

Ruth Steiner and David Hiley

Liturgical book of the Western Church containing some chants for the Mass. The term appears in Ordo romanus I (compiled in the late 7th or early 8th century and describing the papal Mass at Rome), where it refers to the book from which the cantor sings the gradual and the alleluia or tract: ‘Postquam legerit cantor cum cantatorio ascendit et dicit responsum. Si fuerit tempus ut dicat alleluia, bene; sin autem, tractum; sin minus, tantummodo responsum’ (see Andrieu, ii, p.86; some of the manuscripts call for another singer to perform the alleluia). Other early references to the cantatorium show that it was a liturgical book, but they are less specific about its contents and use (see Blaise, 128, and ...

Article

( US-Cn VM C.25). See Sources of lute music, §2.

Article

Thomas B. Payne

The title given by Johann Andreas Schmeller to his complete edition (1847) of the poems in an early 13th-century German manuscript (now D-Mbs Clm 4660) that had come in 1803 from the Benedictine abbey of Benediktbeuern, about 50 km south of Munich. Since then the manuscript has been known by that title even though it is now generally agreed that it probably did not originate in Benediktbeuren and may have come from Seckau in Carinthia or the Tyrol. The manuscript is perhaps the most important source for Latin secular poetry of the 12th century; there are in addition some Latin sacred lyrics, German poems, liturgical plays and a satirical ‘Gamblers' Mass’. Several of the poems have music in unheighted neumes – a style of notation that is relatively rare at so late a date. The melodies must, for the most part, be reconstructed from concordances in the St Martial and Notre Dame repertories. Orff's cantata ...

Article

Charles Hamm and Jerry Call

In 

See Sources, MS

Article

See Libraries

Article

( D-B , Bü 84). See Sources of keyboard music to 1660, §2, (iii).

Article

See Sources, MS

Article

Howard Mayer Brown

A manuscript or printed book containing principally chansons (i.e. lyric poetry in French) or monophonic or polyphonic settings of such poetry. The most important medieval chansonniers date from the 13th century and contain the monophonic songs of the troubadours and trouvères (for summary list of principal monophonic chansonniers, and illustration, ...

Article

( F-Pn Rothschild 2973). See Sources, MS, §IX, 8.

Article

Charles Hamm and Jerry Call

In 

See Sources, MS

Article

( F-CH 564). See Sources, MS, §VII, 3.

Article

J. Bradford Young

Music libraries classify and arrange their collections by content according to one of several systems. The M schedule of the Library of Congress (LC) Classification, developed by oscar g.t. Sonneck in 1902, is the most widely used. It was taken up by many other libraries to reduce cataloging costs, when the Library of Congress increased the distribution of its printed catalog cards. The Dewey decimal classification (DDC), still in use especially in public libraries, did not distinguish music from music literature until ...