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David Johnson

(b Laurencekirk, Kincardineshire, Oct 25, 1735; d Aberdeen, Aug 18, 1803). Scottish philosopher and writer on musical aesthetics. He was the son of a farmer, and became professor of moral philosophy and logic at Marischal College, Aberdeen, and entered polite London society on the strength of his ...

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Jere T. Humphreys

(b Norwalk, OH, Nov 26, 1885; d Evanston, IL, Nov 22, 1962). American music educator and administrator. He obtained a degree in history from Denison University (BA 1907), where he directed the glee club, studied voice, and was a founding member of the band. He also attended a Ginn and Company music textbook summer school in Chicago (...

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(1) Pseudonym of Alberta Hunter

(2) Pseudonym used by Eva Taylor for one recording.

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Claude Conyers

(b Cedar Grove, LA, Dec 22, 1918; d New York, April 29, 1995). American dancer, choreographer, teacher, and company director. Having begun formal dance training with Katherine Dunham in Chicago, he made his first appearance on stage in Ruth Page’s 1934 production of ...

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Arthur Jacobs

(b 1837; d at sea, Oct 4, 1900). English librettist and translator . He wrote the librettos for Isidore de Lara’s The Light of Asia (‘a sacred legend’) and Leonhard Emil Bach’s Irmengarda, both produced without success at Covent Garden in 1892, and was the author of the English version of ...

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Laurence Libin

(b Coleman County, TX, March 18, 1899; d at sea nr Los Angeles, CA, March 30, 1941). American inventor of musical instruments. He was co-founder of the National Stringed Instrument Corporation and the Rickenbacker guitar company. He played the violin and the lap steel (‘Hawaiian’) guitar in vaudeville before settling in Los Angeles, where he worked with John and Rudy Dopyera to develop an acoustically amplified guitar, probably inspired by Stroh models. An early model with a Victrola horn failed, but trials using conical aluminium resonators within a metal guitar body (a prototype of the three-cone Dobro guitar) proved successful and attracted investors. Production of metal-body guitars under the name National soon involved Adolph Rickenbacker’s nearby tool and die shop....

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Maureen Needham

(b Paris, Oct 30, 1631; d Paris, early Feb 1705). French dancer, choreographer, composer and conductor. He has been wrongly identified with Charles-Louis Beauchamps. Called the father of all ballet-masters, he codified the five positions of feet and arms, and developed a rational system of dance notation which is now called after Raoul-Auger Feuillet, who published it (in his ...

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(b Paris, 1689; d Paris, March 22, 1781). French dramatist and literary historian. A prolific writer of ballets, comedies, harlequinades and licentious tales disguised in the garb of classical antiquity, Beauchamps seems to have begun his career in 1714 when he wrote the words for the divertissement ...

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Christiane Spieth-Weissenbacher

(b Beauvais, Oise, Dec 30, 1899; d Paris, Jan 11, 1985). French aesthetician. He studied in Paris (1917) and, after the war, in Strasbourg (1921–4), where he prepared his agrégation in German (1925). While holding a musicological post (...

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Carol MacClintock and Iain Fenlon

(b Piedmont, c1535; d c1587). Italian ballet-master and violinist. He went to France in about 1555 as leader of a band of violinists sent by the Maréchal de Brissac to Catherine de' Medici; soon he adopted French nationality and changed his name to Balthasar de Beaujoyeux. Beaujoyeux was not only a good musician and a competent violinist, but also a tactful and successful courtier who rapidly found favour with his French masters, serving successively as ...

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(b c1543; fl Marseilles, 1555–8). French composer and poet. In December 1557 Robert Granjon and Guillaume Guéroult of Lyons announced that they intended to publish ‘new music by a child from Marseilles’; the dedication of the ensuing Chansons nouvelles … à quatre parties...

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(b Paris, April 11, 1791; d Niort, Deux Sèvres, Dec 21, 1863). French composer, folk music collector, musical philanthropist and writer on music. He studied the violin with Rodolphe Kreutzer and composition with Benincori before entering the Paris Conservatoire in Méhul’s class. In ...

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(b Beaulieu-sur-Ménoire, Bas-Limousin, c1495; d Basle, Jan 8, 1552). French poet and composer. He was organist at Lectoure Cathedral (Gers) in 1522 and from 1524 taught music at Tulle. About this time he entered the priesthood. He moved to Lyons in 1534...

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French music teacher and possibly a composer, who may have been related to Lambert de Beaulieu.

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Frank Dobbins

(fl 1559–90). French ?composer and singer. His voice was praised in an ode by Olivier de Magny published in 1559. Fétis claimed that he composed the vocal music to Beaujoyeux’s Balet comique de la Royne (Paris, 1582/R; ed. in MSD, xxv, ...

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Rudolph Angermüller and Philip E.J. Robinson

(b Paris, Jan 24, 1732; d Paris, May 18, 1799). French writer. The son of a clockmaker, he defended his invention of a watch escapement mechanism against theft by the royal clockmaker Lepaute, whom he replaced at court in 1755. He subsequently became harp teacher to the daughters of Louis XV and, thanks to contact with the ...

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Philip Weller

(d 1688). French baritone (basse-taille). Recruited in Languedoc, he first sang in Paris in 1671, in Cambert’s Pomone (as Vertumne) and Les peines et les plaisirs de l’amour. He joined the Opéra in 1672. The Parfaict brothers (MS, F-Pn ) attributed the creation of the title role in ...

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(b Paris, 30 or Aug 31, 1748; d Paris, 1813). French singer and composer. Having specialized from the age of seven in soubrette roles in comedies, she made a successful début at the Paris Opéra on 27 November 1766, replacing Sophie Arnould in the title role of ...

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(b Chenou, Château-Landon, between ?1475 and 1490; d Rome, May 22, 1542). French composer. His sobriquet, which appears with his music to the exclusion of his family name, reflects his origin in the region of Beauce. He became a member of the Ste Chapelle, Paris, in ...

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David Hiley

City in France. It is the diocesan seat in the archdiocese of Reims. It was the capital of the Bellovaci Gauls until Julius Caesar’s conquest in 57 bce; the Normans overran it in 851 and 861. The last reference to a lay Count of Beauvais occurs in ...