57,761-57,780 of 57,904 results

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Gregg Miner

Musical instrument. Generic term for an American or European zither that has only nonfretted (open) strings, as opposed to a concert or “Alpine” zither, which utilizes a fretted fingerboard. (See also Zither, fretted .) Fretless zithers were commercially developed and widely distributed in many forms beginning in the late 19th century, especially in the United States. The earliest such invention is the ...

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David J. Kyger

Musical string instrument. The fretted zither is a resonating body with strings extending across the width of the instrument. A modern zither has five fretboard strings and up to 37 open strings. It is placed on a flat surface with the player seated behind the instrument. Frets are set into the fretboard, indicating where the fingers of the left hand need to stop the strings in order to play melodies. A ring with a projecting thorn is placed on the tip of the right-hand thumb to strike the fretboard strings, while the remaining fingers act upon the open strings for the accompaniment....

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Lyudmila Korabel′nikova

(b Moscow, May 25, 1921; d Moscow, May 30, 1994). Russian composer. He graduated in 1947 from the Moscow Conservatory (where he studied composition with Kabalevsky), having taught theory at the music college attached to the conservatory since 1944. His output is chiefly associated with the stage, cinema and television. He worked for the Sovremennik, MKhAT and Chekhov theatres, and his scores were all performed in theatres in either Moscow, Leningrad, Sverdlovsk or other Russian cities. He wrote the scores for more than 40 films, including ...

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Stana Duric-Klajn

(b Belgrade, May 25, 1901; d Belgrade, June 29, 1964). Serbian composer, musicologist, teacher and conductor. He studied at the Stanković Music School in Belgrade, where he also graduated in law in 1924; his composition studies were continued with Grabner at the Leipzig Conservatory (...

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Melita Milin

(b Split, May 3, 1935). Serbian composer. She studied composition with Rajičić at the Belgrade Academy of Music (graduation, 1964) and later studied with Messiaen and Boulanger in Paris (1967–8). She was appointed professor of theory at Belgrade, and has published essays on harmony and counterpoint as well as analytical studies of works by 20th-century Serbian composers. Her early compositions include neo-Baroque features, though their atonal language is also to some extent Expressionist. Later works, such as ...

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See Raḥbānī family

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Angelina Petrova

(b Ruse, Bulgaria, April 23, 1905; d Sofia, Bulgaria, March 29, 1977). Bulgarian composer and voice pedagogue. In his endeavour to create a pronouncedly Bulgarian vocal colour he composed some of the most popular works in Bulgaria during the 1930s and 1940s. Among others, ‘Sevdana’ and ‘Pastoral’ deserve a special mention....

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Lada Duraković

(b Sovinjak, nr Buzet, June 1, 1910; d Pula, Oct 27, 1993). Croatian conductor, composer, and musical pedagogue. He received the degree in composition in 1934 at the Music Academy in Zagreb. Until 1941 he worked as city kapelmaster and director of the Music School in Sušak. From ...

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(b Leštiny, bap. Nov 20, 1759; d Vienna, June 23, 1833). Hungarian composer . He arrived in Vienna in 1784 as secretary of the Hungarian Chancellery, a post he held until 1825. An amateur cellist, he became a close friend of Beethoven, who dedicated to him his String Quartet op.95; the Duet in E♭ for viola and cello ...

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A type of chant used in Russian church music. See Russian and Slavonic church music, §2.

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Sigrid Wiesmann

(b Vienna, Jan 9, 1950; d Hanover, March 21, 1991). Austrian composer and percussionist. He studied at the Vienna Hochschule für Musik, where his teachers included Urbanner and Cerha, with Kotonski in Warsaw (1972–3), at Vienna University and at Humboldt University, Berlin (PhD musicology ...

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Giorgos Sakallieros

(b Gavalou, Mesolongi, Aug 8, 1940). Greek guitarist. She studied with Dēmētrēs Fampas at the National Conservatory of Athens (1953–60). Right after graduating, she won the first prize at the International Guitar Competition of Naples. She became the first Greek female professional classical guitarist as well as the first Greek guitarist to perform concertos with orchestra (transcr. of Vivaldi’s Mandoline Concerto in D major, RV93 (...

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E. Heron-Allen and John Moran

(b Berlin, March 26, 1840; d London, July 13, 1889). German player of the viola d’amore, bandmaster and composer . At the Berlin Conservatory, Hubert Ries, W. Gärich and A.E. Grell taught him the violin, harmony and counterpoint respectively. He travelled in Germany with an Italian opera company, eventually settling in London in ...

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David Cummings

(b Mobile, al , Aug 17, 1949). American soprano. She studied with Elena Nikolaidi at Florida State University and made her début at the Houston Opera in 1975, as Donna Elvira. She has appeared widely in North America as Fiordiligi and Pamina, and as Giulietta in ...

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Dimitrije Bužarovski

(b Veles, March 29, 1934; d Skopje, Jan 14, 2000). Macedonian composer and educator. His compositions are among the first large-scale orchestral works (Sinfonietta in Es, Sinfonietta in Si, and Fantasia corale) which, in the 1950s and 1960s, moved Macedonian music toward the contemporary occidental music styles. Both his compositional and educational activities essentially influenced the developement of Macedonian music at the end of the 20th century....

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Mireya Obregón

(b Guadalajara, Mexico, May 8, 1962). American Composer. Zohn-Muldoon’s teenage years were devoted to training as a classical guitarist and to developing, performing with, and composing for a rock band that included composer Carlos Sánchez-Gutiérrez and other young musicians in Guadalajara. After pursuing a career in architecture, he decided to study music in the United States. He received an undergraduate degree from the University of California, San Diego, and a master’s and doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied under ...

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Svetlana Sarkisyan

(b Yerevan, Jan 29, 1945). Armenian composer. He studied composition at the Melikian Music College with Bagdasarian (1963–7) and then at the Yerevan Conservatory with Eghiazarian (1967–72). In 1972 he began to teach harmony at the Babadjanian Music College and in ...

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Harry B. Lincoln

(b Rome, c1537; d Loreto, 1592). Italian composer and singer. He spent most of his life in Rome. After singing in the Cappella Giulia from 9 August 1558 until February 1561, he was maestro di cappella of S Luigi dei Francesi from ...

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Harry B. Lincoln

(b Rome, 1584; d ?Rome, after 1622). Italian composer, son of Annibale Zoilo. A letter from his father in 1585 refers to him as being then one year old. As a boy he sang in the choir of S Maria Maggiore, Rome. He was ...

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Richard Langham Smith

(b Paris, April 2, 1840; d Paris, Sept 29, 1902). French writer. Brought up in Aix-en-Provence, he became a leading man of letters in the latter years of the 19th century, having a profound effect on the arts reaching far beyond the boundaries of his own work. He is celebrated as the leading figure in French ...