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Ana Ryker

(b Amsterdam, May 18, 1854; d Amsterdam, Dec 9, 1924). Dutch composer. Together with Alphons Diepenbrock and Johan Wagenaar he was one of the principal figures in Dutch music at the turn of the century. His father, a well-known amateur singer, owned a book and music shop in Amsterdam where Bernard worked and consequently came to know many notable musicians. In ...

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Intermezzo by Giovanni Paisiello; see Due contesse, Le.

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Richard Evidon and Tamara Levitz

(b Vienna, Nov 28, 1881; d Petrópolis, Brazil, Feb 22, 1942). Austrian writer . In his day a leading European literary figure, he was exceptionally cultivated and had deep humanistic sympathies. His active pacifism dates from his exile in Zürich (1917–18), during which time he met several noteworthy musical figures. After the war he became one of the more highly regarded, widely read and translated Austrian writers of his generation. In ...

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Hellmut Federhofer

(b Judenburg, Styria, c1545–50; d ?Graz, Styria, May 1582). Austrian singer and composer. He was chorister in the Stephansdom, Vienna, and in 1559 was admitted to the university there. In 1572 his name appears last in a list of five basses employed at the Graz court household of Archduke Karl II of Inner Austria. At the express wish of the archduke he took holy orders and in ...

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Andrew Lamb

(b Pistyán, Hungary, July 13, 1876; d Vienna, 14/June 15, 1947). Austro-Hungarian soprano. She sang soubrette roles at the Carltheater in Vienna from 1901 to 1920, also appearing at the summer theatre in the Prater, the Raimundtheater and the Theater an der Wien. She was the original Franzi in Straus’s ...

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Alfred Clayton

Opera in one act, op.17, by alexander Zemlinsky to a libretto by Georg Klaren after oscar Wilde’s novel The Birthday of the Infanta; Cologne, Neues Theater, 28 May 1922.

The origins of Der Zwerg lie in Zemlinsky’s obsession with ugliness. Significantly, Alma Mahler referred to Zemlinsky himself in her memoirs as ‘a horrible dwarf’. He may first have come across Wilde’s story in ...

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William Kirk Bares

(b New York, NY, May 18, 1930; d Paris, France, April 2, 2010). American Jazz trombonist, bass trumpeter, and author. He is most widely known in musical circles for his work in Miles Davis’s Birth of the Cool band in 1948. Zwerin is better known to readers as a jazz contributor to ...

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Karl Pfannhauser

(b Weitra, Lower Austria, bap. June 5, 1759; d Vienna, Aug 30, 1826). Austrian composer . He was a choirboy at the Schottenkloster in Vienna, studied humanities at Krems an der Donau and completed a philosophy course in Vienna. In 1778 he entered the Schottenkloster and in ...

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Victor H. Mattfeld

(b Konstanz, c1496; d Bischofszell, Oct 23, 1542). Swiss reformer, poet and hymnographer . In 1509 he entered Freiburg University to study law, where he met and became a friend of the humanist Bonifacius Amerbach. In 1518 he was ordained and, with his brother, matriculated at Bologna University, later going to study law at Siena University. In ...

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Zwickau  

Martin Schoppe

City in eastern Germany, dating from about 1200. The cathedral (St Marien) was consecrated in 1118, and in 1291 a city school was founded; its pupils provided music for the cathedral, but by 1470 the latter had appointed its own precentor. Typical of many medieval cities, it held performances of mystery plays and Latin comedies, and, in the early 16th century, Protestant plays at the school. The school day began and ended with choral singing; its library, established in ...

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K. Robert Schwarz

(b Miami, April 30, 1939). American composer and violinist. She studied with John Boda at Florida State University (BM 1960, MM 1962), then moved to New York to study the violin with Galamian. As a member of the American SO under Stokowski, she acquired invaluable training in performance and orchestration. Eventually, she enrolled at the Juilliard School, where she studied with Carter and Sessions and, in ...

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Elizabeth Norman McKay

Posse in one act by Franz Schubert to a libretto by Georg von Hofmann after a French vaudeville Les deux Valentins; Vienna, Kärntnertortheater, 14 June 1820.

Schubert received this, his first theatrical commission, at the end of 1818 and completed the work in January 1819...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(b Hamburg, Germany, May 7, 1955). German pianist, brother of Torsten Zwingenberger. He studied classical piano from the age of six and adopted the boogie-woogie style in 1973. From 1974 he performed at numerous boogie-woogie, blues, and jazz festivals and broadcast frequently on television and radio throughout Europe, and between ...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(b Hamburg, Germany, Jan 12, 1959). German drummer, brother of Axel Zwingenberger. From the mid-1970s he led his own groups and performed and recorded regularly with his brother; in 1978 the two recorded in Los Angeles as accompanists to Joe Turner (ii). In ...

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Robin A. Leaver

(b Wildhaus, Jan 1, 1484; d Cappel, Oct 11, 1531). Swiss humanist and church reformer . Of all the reformers of the 16th century he was the most musically gifted and yet the most antagonistic towards the use of music in public worship. He was educated first in Basle, then in Berne where he came under the influence of the poet, composer and humanist scholar Wölflin. While in Berne, at the age of 12 Zwingli entered the chapel choir of the local monastery simply to further his musical ambitions. Many of his contemporaries (e.g. Bullinger and Myconius) commented on his extraordinary musical gifts. Wyss (see Finsler, ...

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Michael Tilmouth

An interlude or intermezzo. The term has been applied to musical interludes that serve simply to entertain between the acts of operatic works of the 19th and 20th centuries, although ‘entr’acte’ or ‘Entrakt’ has often been preferred even in German-speaking countries. It has also been used of those interludes that contribute to the essential dramatic structure of the whole, e.g. the Zwischenspiel between Acts 1 and 2 of Schoenberg’s ...

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Organ builder. See Suisse.

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Luise Marretta-Schär

(b Bauen, canton of Uri, Nov 17, 1808; d Mehrerau, nr Bregenz, Nov 19, 1854). Swiss composer . He is best remembered for Trittst im Morgenrot daher, now the Swiss national anthem. At the age of 12 he entered the school of Wettingen Abbey. There he studied the piano, organ, violin and guitar, the last-named remaining his favourite instrument. He took his final vows as a Cistercian monk in ...

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Zydeco  

Mark F. DeWitt

Regional accordion-based music for partner dancing, originating from traditional music of Afro-French Creoles of rural southwest Louisiana and influenced by Cajun music and African American popular music genres such as urban blues, rhythm-and-blues, and hip hop.

In the context of zydeco, “Creole” as an ethnic term refers to persons of African descent with francophone family histories that may also include French, Spanish, Native American, and other backgrounds. This usage of the contested term Creole varies somewhat in New Orleans, on the opposite (east) side of the Atchafalaya Basin. Cajun music and zydeco developed in parallel in the same region of the United States, borrowed extensively from each other, and took advantage of the same regional recording industry. (...

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Lothar Knessl

(b Vienna, April 29, 1935). Austrian composer and pianist. He studied at the Vienna Music Academy, where his teachers included Karl Schiske (composition), Bruno Seidlhofer and Josef Dichler (piano). He also attended the Darmstadt summer courses (1958, 1964–6), winning the Kranichstein Music Prize of the international piano competition on his first visit. In ...