41-60 of 724 results  for:

  • Idiophones (Instrument Body Percussion) x
Clear all

Article

Ankle rattles of the Zulu people of southern Africa, worn by dancers. The Swazi emafahlawane and Mpondo (Xhosa) amahlahlazo are similar. They comprise either a number of cocoons or small palm-leaf boxes containing small stones, fastened to a fibre cord for tying round the ankles. The cocoon type is also called ...

Article

Ankle bells worn by dancers among the Bhaca and Mpondo (Xhosa) peoples of southern Africa.

Article

Ankle rattles of goatskin used by the Xhosa people of southern Africa. Formerly worn by abakhwetha (males undergoing initiation) for the umtshilo dance, they resemble the Sotho morutlhoana.

See also Morutlhoana .

Article

Clappers of the Zulu people of southern Africa. Like the marapo of the Tswana, they are made from a pair of rib bones and are used for rhythmic song-accompaniment.

P.R. Kirby: The Musical Instruments of the Native Races of South Africa (London, 1934, 2/1965), 10, and pl.5....

Article

Ambira  

Xylophone and lamellaphone of south-eastern Africa, reported by Fr J. dos Santos cl590. In the xylophone, gourd resonators, graded in size, were mounted below the bars, and a mirliton membrane covered the mouth of each resonator; the Mbila mtondo of the Venda people is similar....

Article

Amponga  

Generic term current in Madagascar for percussion instruments. It includes cylindrical drums such as amponga ntaolo (‘ancestors’ drum’) and the ground zither amponga tany (‘earthen drum’).

Article

Andelu  

Jeremy Montagu

Rattle used by ballad singers of Andhra Pradesh, India. It is a pair of hollow metal rings about 4 to 5 cm in diameter, open all around the outer circumference and containing metal pellets. The rings are worn on the thumbs or fingers. It is similar to the ...

Article

Andzolo  

F.J. de Hen

Metal handbell of the Bandia of the Buta region in the northern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is played in dance music, with drums and Akiri bells.

Article

The name given to a set of musical glasses invented by Richard Pockrich in 1741. It seems to have been the first instrument of the type to be played by stroking the rims with the fingers rather than by hitting them with sticks.

See also...

Article

Mervyn McLean

Rudimentary xylophone of Blanche Bay, New Britain, Papua New Guinea. It consists of two pieces of hardwood with fire-toughened ends, 75 to l m long, about 15 cm wide, flat, and unequal in length. The player first makes a hole (resonator) in the sand over which he sits with his legs apart. He then places the two sticks across his thighs and plays upon them with two short wooden sticks....

Article

Small, relatively thick Cymbals, of clear, definite pitch. Up to about 12 cm in diameter and commonly played in pairs, they are often called ‘finger cymbals’ and held each in one hand or looped to a finger and thumb of one hand. Sets of up to 13 (one chromatic octave) can be mounted on a frame and struck with light metal hammers. In modern parlance they are often called ...

Article

Anukué  

John M. Schechter

Afro-Cuban vessel rattle. It is constructed of two 15-cm-long metal cones soldered together not at the 3 cm diameter bases but at the vertices. They contain small stones, hard seeds, or shot, which resound when the instrument is shaken by one hand holding it at the centre. It is used in Arará or Dahomeyan rites to honour the deities Achetó and Ogún, respectively. Nowadays it is rare. The similar ...

Article

Anvil  

James Blades and James Holland

In the orchestra, a percussion instrument of indefinite pitch; it is classified as a struck idiophone. It may consist of one or two metal bars mounted on a resonating frame, a small length of steel tube or scaffolding, or an actual blacksmith's anvil. The latter is used but rarely an account of its great weight, the substitutes providing a realistic sound. In each case, although definable notes are produced, they are not usually prescribed. Praetorius illustrated a blacksmith's anvil struck with a sledgehammer in his ...

Article

Aoko  

Konin Aka

Scraper of the Baule and Agni-Morofwe peoples of Ivory Coast. A serrated stick passes through a hole pierced in a nut; the right hand moves the nut along the stick against which the left hand occasionally presses a small resonator. The instrument, played only by women and young girls, is used for rhythmic accompaniment to singing for amusement....

Article

Laurence Libin

Keyboard instrument invented about 1822 by Schortmann of Buttelstedt near Weimar. The quiet tone, similar to that of an aeolian harp, was said to be produced by currents of air striking a series of flexible upright wooden rods; the wind was supplied by pedal-operated bellows. It was used in concerts by the military music director C.T. Theuss in Weimar but soon became obsolete. It was reportedly a development of Eschenbach’s slightly earlier free-reed ‘Äoline’ and similar to Baudet’s ‘Piano chanteur’ (...

Article

Aramba  

Margaret J. Kartomi and Andrew C. McGraw

Vertically suspended bronze gong of Nias, Indonesia. It is imported from Central Java and is equivalent to the Javanese kempul. It is slung from the beams of a house, beaten with the fist or a soft beater (bozi-bozi garamba), and played in an ensemble together with one or more small gongs (...

Article

Arigo  

F.J. de Hen

Trapezoidal or tulip-shaped Slit-drum of the Mangutu of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the region of Watsa Gombari the trapezoidal arigo is reserved for the use of the chief.

LaurentyTF, 139 F.J. de Hen: Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Musikinstrumente aus Belgisch Kongo und Ruanda-Urundi...

Article

A sophisticated form of Musical glasses , invented by Benjamin Franklin in 1761, in which a row of glass bowls are nested within one another concentrically on a horizontal axle, which is turned with a pedal.

Todini, Michele

Musical glasses

Article

Aro  

Amanda Villepastour

Combined rattle and concussion Clappers of the Yorùbá people of Nigeria and Benin. The instrument comprises two metal rings, each holding three containers, inside which are pellets. The player holds the instruments more or less horizontally and strikes the sides of the rings together. The ...

Article

Mauricio Molina

Frame rattle of medieval Spain. It consisted of a circular wooden frame with jingles and pellet bells attached (but without a drum head); it was beaten or shaken. In medieval art it is usually represented playing in ensemble with wind, string, and other percussion instruments....