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Article

Lynda MacGregor

(b Niedernhall, Württemberg, Feb 1, 1773; d Frankfurt, July 26, 1806). German cellist. The son of a schoolmaster, who gave him preliminary musical training, he made local appearances with the cello when he was eight; in 1785 he was apprenticed to the town musician at Künzelsau, where he spent five years, followed by a period with his uncle, who held a similar position at Wertheim. But ensuing attempts to start a solo career, making short tours in southern Germany and Switzerland, proved abortive, hampered by the absence of proper training. Accordingly, he went first to Regensburg for some months' study with Max Willmann, the first cello teaching he had received. He proceeded to Hamburg in ...

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(b Paris, Feb 13, 1740; d Paris, Oct 22, 1802). French soprano. A precocious child, she studied Latin and Italian and received a solid general education. Her performance in sacred music impressed the royal family and Mme de Pompadour, and she was appointed to the Opéra, studying declamation with Clairon and singing with ...

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Philip Bate and David Lasocki

(b Lisburn, Co. Antrim, c1759; d Dublin, 1838). Irish flautist and composer. When 12 he was adopted by Count Bentinck, a British naval captain, and travelled widely with him in Europe. He quickly learnt the flute but abandoned it because of his dissatisfaction with the contemporary one-keyed instrument. He returned to the flute in ...

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(b Linz, bap. April 2, 1728; d Vienna, July 29, 1786). Austrian composer and violinist. He probably received his first musical instruction from his father, a dancing-master. After his father's death he found employment by 1759 as secretarius and violinist to Count Morzin during Haydn's tenure as music director. He was by then an established composer, with works published in Paris perhaps as early as ...

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Atys  

Roger J.V. Cotte

(b St Domingue [now Haiti], April 18, 1715; d Paris, Aug 8, 1784). French creole flautist, composer and teacher. His skill as a flute virtuoso and teacher made him renowned in Paris and Vienna, but his concert career was cut short by a chin wound received in a pistol duel. He was among the first flautists to use crescendo and diminuendo instead of simple echo contrasts. His compositions, all published in Paris, are primarily intended for amateur flautists: they include duos ‘en forme de conversation’ op.1 (...

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(b Amiens, 1763; d Paris, c1830). French cellist and guitarist. He studied music at the maîtrise of his home town but was self-taught at his principal instrument, the cello. In 1787 he was established as a cello teacher in Paris, and he played for 25 years in the orchestra of the Opéra-Comique. Aubert also took up the guitar after Ferdinando Carulli’s famous appearance in Paris in ...

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(b Bourmont-en-Bassigny, Haute-Marne, June 7, 1732; d Paris, May 21, 1801). French impresario, singer and dramatist. He first made his name as a singer with the Opéra-Comique (after about 1758), chiefly in artisan roles; no doubt it was to exploit this special talent that he was allowed to put on an ...

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(fl Vienna; d 1786). Austrian keyboard player and composer. The daughter of Leopold von Auenbrugger, a well-known Austrian physician who wrote the German libretto for Antonio Salieri’s comic opera Der Rauchfangkehrer, she studied composition with Salieri and published her only known work together with two of his odes. Marianna and her sister Katharina, both distinguished keyboard players, were known to Haydn and to the Mozart family. Haydn dedicated six of his piano sonatas to them (...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Bologna, Feb 19, 1754; d Bologna, Sept 22, 1816). Italian tenor . He studied with Arcangelo Cortoni and made his début in 1773 in Modena. After singing in various Italian cities, he was engaged at the court operas of Berlin and then St Petersburg (...

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E. Eugene Helm and Martin Elste

(b Berlin, 1748; d Berlin, May 26, 1809). German viol player and instrument maker. He was a viol player in the royal chapel from 1765, and in 1770, together with J.F.E. Benda, he established the Berlin Liebhaberkonzerte. With Benda’s death in 1785 Bachmann succeeded him as director of the concerts; in the same year he married the noted singer and pianist Charlotte Caroline Wilhelmine Stöwe. Throughout this period he also made instruments in the shop of his father, the violin maker and court violinist Anton Bachmann (...

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Eberhard Stiefel

(b Kettershausen, nr Illertissen, July 18, 1754; d Reutlingendorf, nr Ehingen an der Donau, Oct 18, 1825). German composer and keyboard player. A child prodigy, he probably received his earliest instruction in music from his grandfather Franz Joseph Schmöger, choral director and organist in Markt Biberbach. It was there on 5 or ...

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Olive Baldwin and Thelma Wilson

(b London, ?1745; d Edinburgh, July 1, 1786). English actress and soprano . Daughter of the trumpeter Valentine Snow, she eloped with the actor Robert Baddeley and in 1764 made her début as Ophelia at Drury Lane. Although the prompter Hopkins found her Ophelia ‘very bad, all but the singing’, she made a charming heroine in genteel and Shakespearean comedy. In English operas she was particularly successful as Patty (...

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Roger J.V. Cotte

(b Fockenhof, Kurland, Feb 14, 1722; d Paris, March 24, 1791). French dilettante, amateur violinist and composer, patron of the arts and instrument collector. A magnificent and very wealthy nobleman, he both amused and astounded his contemporaries. M. Audinot in his comic opera ...

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Percy M. Young

(b c1727; d London, bur. May 2, 1774). English composer and singer. He was for some time a lay clerk in Westminster Abbey and in 1754, 1758 and 1759 took part in the Foundling Hospital performances of Messiah under Handel. He was described in the subsequent list of Boyce’s ...

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(b Milan, July 27, 1736; d Milan, March 14, 1804). Italian violinist and composer. Burney’s erroneous alliance of Baillou with the famous 18th-century family of opera singers – the Baglioni – has led nearly every later writer to distinguish Luigi Baglioni the Stuttgart court violinist from the Milanese Luigi (Louis) de Baillou; but a programme for the ballet ...

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Dennis Libby

(b ?Genoa, ?1758; d after 1784). Italian soprano . She was said to have come from an impoverished noble Genoese family, her real name being Maria Bertaldi. Although she sang in opera seria alone from 1778 to 1784, retiring after her marriage, she made a great impression and was long remembered. She appeared at Pavia, Venice, Milan (as seconda donna in the distinguished company that opened La Scala in ...

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Michel Noiray

(b Bologna, c1743; d after ? 1787). French composer and harpsichordist of Italian origin. He was the son of the impressario Eustachio Bambini (b Pesaro, 1697; d Pesaro, 1770). He went to Paris in July 1752 at the same time as the company of Bouffons directed by his father. Jean-Jacques Rousseau mentioned him in the ...

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Bruce Carr

(b Monticelli d’Ongina, nr Crema, 1755; d Bologna, Feb 18, 1806). Italian soprano. Her father, a street singer and mandolin player, took her to Paris when she was about 20; there she met de Vismes, director of the Opéra, who arranged her début there (...

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Chappell White

(b Naples, April 14, 1718; d Naples, Jan 1, 1777). Italian violinist and composer. His first teacher was his father, Francesco Barbella, composer and maestro di violino at the Conservatorio di S Maria di Loreto. He was later instructed by Angelo Zaga and by Pasqualino Bini, a noted pupil of Tartini. In theory and composition he was the pupil of Michele Cabbalone until the latter's death in ...

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Title adopted by Edward Jones.