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Mary Hunter

( fl Naples, c 1770–1803). Italian librettist . He worked almost exclusively in Naples, and is known particularly for his connection with P. A. Guglielmi. His librettos, all comic or semi-serious, are often set in or around Naples, and sometimes include dialect roles. He seemed particularly fond of comedies of disguise and mistaken identity; the disguise often involves a change of class and provides opportunities for the depiction of inept attempts to be noble, or true nobility shining through humble circumstances: both are found, for example, in ...

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E. Heron-Allen and John Moran

(b Berlin, March 26, 1840; d London, July 13, 1889). German player of the viola d’amore, bandmaster and composer . At the Berlin Conservatory, Hubert Ries, W. Gärich and A.E. Grell taught him the violin, harmony and counterpoint respectively. He travelled in Germany with an Italian opera company, eventually settling in London in ...

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Richard Langham Smith

(b Paris, April 2, 1840; d Paris, Sept 29, 1902). French writer. Brought up in Aix-en-Provence, he became a leading man of letters in the latter years of the 19th century, having a profound effect on the arts reaching far beyond the boundaries of his own work. He is celebrated as the leading figure in French ...

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Deane L. Root and Michael Musgrave

(b Mittelhausen, Thuringia, May 17, 1800; d Leipzig, Sept 25, 1860). German choral director and composer. He was first taught music by his father, a schoolteacher, and in Leipzig from 1814 he studied music at the Thomasschule with J.G. Schicht, through whose influence he was appointed singing teacher at the Ratsfreischule (...

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Deane L. Root

(b Leipzig, July 4, 1854; d Freiburg, May 8, 1941). German conductor and composer, son of Carl Friedrich Zöllner. He studied music at the Leipzig Conservatory (1875–7) under Reinecke, Jadassohn and E.F. Richter, and in 1878 was appointed director of music at the University of Dorpat (now Tartu, Estonia). In ...

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Christopher Fifield

(b Glogau [now Głogów], Silesia, June 1, 1826; d Leipzig, July 12, 1883). German critic and composer . At his father’s wish he studied agriculture in Breslau and Berlin, and only after the successful performance of an overture in 1850 did he decide to make music his career. He studied with A.B. Marx and Theodor Kullak at the Stern Conservatory in Berlin, where he later joined the staff to teach music theory. In Berlin he also founded an opera academy and an orchestra, but he moved to Leipzig in ...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Munich, Jan 24, 1869; d Dresden, Dec 11, 1941). German bass . The son of the bass-baritone Ludwig Zottmayr, he studied in Munich and began his career as a concert singer. After stage appearances in Vienna (1906) and in Prague (...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Amberg, Bavaria, March 31, 1828; d Weimar, Oct 16, 1899). German bass-baritone . He made his début in 1855 at Nuremberg and was then engaged at Hamburg, Hanover and, in 1865, at the Munich Hofoper, where he remained until 1880. He sang King Mark in the first performance of ...

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Maria Eckhardt

Hungarian family of church musicians.

(b Zsasskó, County Árva [now Žaškov, Slovakia], Oct 22, 1794; d Eger, April 18, 1866). Schoolmaster and cantor. His musicality greatly influenced the careers of his children. Following his retirement from teaching, he was a violinist in the orchestra of Eger Cathedral....

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Berlin, March 29, 1800; d Berlin, July 7, 1876). German bass . He sang in the children’s chorus of the Berlin Hofoper, then in the regular chorus and in 1819 took on small parts there. After an engagement in Budapest, in 1826 he joined the Königstädtisches Theater, Berlin, making his début as Gaveston (...

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(b Garay, Vizcaya, Feb 13, 1837; d Madrid, Jan 13, 1914). Spanish composer of Basque descent. He was a choirboy in the basilica of Santiago, Bilbao. In 1852 he was appointed organist in the parish church of Santurce, and the following year left Spain for South America, where he was widely acclaimed. He returned in ...

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Judith Tick

(b New York, NY, Dec 25, 1885; d Miami, FL, March 8, 1981). American composer and pianist. She changed her name to Mana Zucca in her teens and became a protégée of the pianist and teacher Alexander Lambert; according to her unpublished memoirs she performed with major orchestras in New York before the age of ten (although this and other claims in her memoirs have not been verified). In ...

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(b Waldbröl, April 12, 1803; d Nachrodt, March 23, 1869). German music scholar, critic and poet of Italian and Dutch extraction. He was educated in Mülheim am Rhein and at the Carmelite Gymnasium in Cologne. After three years’ military service he entered the University of Heidelberg in ...

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Hans-Hubert Schönzeler

(b Oppach, April 9, 1850; d Munich, Sept 4, 1903). German conductor and composer. Trained at the teachers’ seminary at Bautzen (where he also received a thorough musical education), Zumpe taught in the local school at Weigsdorf in 1870–71, then went as a teacher to Leipzig, where he furthered his musical studies with Tottmann. He turned to music completely when Wagner called him to Bayreuth in ...

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Marcia J. Citron

(b Stuttgart, Dec 9, 1796; d Stuttgart, Aug 1, 1857). German composer, pianist, singer and teacher . The youngest of seven children born to the composer Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, she studied the piano with Schlick and theory with Wilhelm Sutor. Gifted with a fine alto voice, she was soon singing and performing on the piano (e.g. at the Stuttgart Museumskonzerte). As an adult Zumsteeg mixed with leading musicians and poets. The literary ties reflected her interest in the lied, which formed the basis of her creative reputation. She also wrote several piano works, such as the early ...

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Sarah L. Martin

(b Hochdorf, Germany, Dec 10, 1815; d Cannstadt, Germany, July 1882). German organist and composer, active in the United States. Zundel received his first music education at the Royal Academy of Esslingen, Württemberg (1829–31). In 1833 he taught music at a seminary in Esslingen, at the same time studying violin with Molique, but gave up that instrument for the organ. In ...

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John Tyrrell

(b Prague, June 21, 1840; d Prague, April 22, 1894). Czech translator and librettist. He made a living for himself through journalism and translating plays (over a hundred), operas and operettas (about 60). He also wrote original plays himself and some opera librettos, mostly adaptations of foreign sources. His best-known libretto, ...

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John Warrack

(b Livonia, Nov 10, 1854; d Steyning, Sussex, Dec 9, 1931). German tenor and teacher . He studied at the Berlin Hochschule, then with Julius Stockhausen in Frankfurt and with Romain Bussine in Paris. This was followed by a special course of study of Schumann's and Schubert's songs with Clara Schumann. He first sang in London in ...

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Miroslav K. Černý and Jitka Ludvová

(b Kublov, nr Beroun, Bohemia, Jan 22, 1824; d Prague, Nov 23, 1865). Czech writer on music, teacher and composer . He completed his early schooling through the help of a priest, who also instructed him in music theory. Having concluded his studies with Pitsch at the organ school in Prague, he became an assistant there, teaching plainsong as well as the organ, and later served briefly as the school's director. In ...

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Ana Ryker

(b Amsterdam, May 18, 1854; d Amsterdam, Dec 9, 1924). Dutch composer. Together with Alphons Diepenbrock and Johan Wagenaar he was one of the principal figures in Dutch music at the turn of the century. His father, a well-known amateur singer, owned a book and music shop in Amsterdam where Bernard worked and consequently came to know many notable musicians. In ...