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Barry Kernfeld

(b Philadelphia, Jan 23, 1928; d Alameda, CA, Dec 4, 2006). American drummer. From 1948, when he won a contest run by Gene Krupa, he worked in local bands, and in the summer and autumn of 1953 he served as house drummer at the Blue Note club in Philadelphia, where he accompanied Charlie Parker, Buddy DeFranco, Georgie Auld, and others. He then toured and recorded with Duke Ellington (late ...

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Sorab Modi

(b Philadelphia, PA, Nov 29, 1894; d Atlanta, GA, Jan 29, 1968). American conductor and composer. At Haverford College he studied piano and chemistry. He began the serious study of music with rafael Joseffy , and wrote songs for vaudeville. He was conductor at the Fox Theater in Philadelphia from ...

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Val Wilmer

(b New Orleans, Feb 1, 1940; d New Orleans, Aug 30, 1988). American drummer and composer. He studied piano and then majored in brass instruments at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where he first played trumpet in the concert orchestra. After changing to drums he secured his first professional job in ...

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Gary W. Kennedy

(b ?Seattle, 1967). American drummer. He grew up in Seattle and first played rock before hearing recordings by Miles Davis at the age of 16 and changing to jazz; while in high school he received classical training on vibraphone, marimba, and timpani. In Boston he studied at the Berklee College of Music (...

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Kenneth Elliott

(fl 1546–87). Scottish composer. In 1546 he was ‘singer’ of the parish church and ‘deput’ under John Fethy at the song school in Aberdeen. By 1556 he was master of the song school, but between 1559 and 1570 his name disappears from the burgh records, and in the latter year he is described as ‘presentlie absent of the realme’. By ...

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(b Rock Island, IL, June 8, 1901; d Rock Island, Nov 18, 1965). American banjoist. He took up banjo as a young child and played professionally from 1917. After playing in the band led by the pianist Carlisle Evans on the SS Capitol...

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Michael Canick

(b Dallas, TX, April 28, 1950; Palo Alto, CA, Nov 14, 1993).

American pianist, conductor, and composer. He attended Oberlin College Conservatory (BM in piano 1972) and the Juilliard School (MM 1974, DMA 1977), studying with Roger Sessions, Ben(jamin Francis) Webster...

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Thomas Owens

Quintet formed in the years 1990–91 by the double bass player Marcus (Mark) Shelby, with Richard Grant (trumpet), James Mahone (saxophone), Ark Sano (piano), and Willie Jones III (drums). After rehearsing at the World Stage, in the Leimert Park area of Los Angeles, where the musicians received coaching from Billy Higgins, Cedar Walton, and others, the quintet began playing once a week at Jazz Etc., a nearby club. In ...

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(b Quebec City, May 22, 1914; d Montreal, March 29, 1988). Canadian composer. After studying music at Laval University (1937–9) and the New England Conservatory (1939–41), he worked as a staff composer with the National Film Board of Canada (...

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Paula Morgan

(b Albany, NY, July 15, 1939). American musicologist. She graduated from Wellesley College (BA 1961) and studied with Edward Lowinsky and Howard Mayer Brown at the University of Chicago (MA 1963, PhD 1970). She was a lecturer at the School of Music, Northwestern University (...

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Roland Baggenaes

(b Rankin, nr Pittsburgh, Nov 12, 1922; d Berlin, 6 or June 7, 1990). American trombonist. He played piano in high school in Birmingham, Alabama, studied at Roosevelt University in Chicago, and formed his own group while serving in the army; during this period he was transferred to Europe, where he was a member of the 7th Army Symphony Orchestra (...

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J. Richard Haefer

Native Americans of a northern Plains culture, now primarily in Montana and southern Canada; they are distributed among three groups distinguished in name as the Piegan , Blood (Kainah), and Northern blackfoot . The amount of music and the association of musical performances with other activities in Blackfoot culture indicate that music fulfills a generalized role (although perhaps less now than in the late 19th century). Songs, both religious and secular, are symbols of real events and do not exist for their own sake; the main function of song is to serve as an authenticating device for ceremonial acts and as a statement of tribal identity....

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Native Americans belonging to the Teton subgroup of the Sioux. They are unrelated to the Blackfoot (i) Indians.

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Blackfoot Indian powwow, c. 1893.

Minnesota Historical Society

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Kenneth Elliott

(b 1535 or 1536; d Jan 31, 1609). Scottish composer. Originally a canon of the Abbey of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh, he was appointed after the Reformation ‘minister of God’s word’ to a number of charges nearby: first in 1564 to Liberton, then in 1567...

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Elizabeth Forbes

(b Rotherham, Jan 1, 1934). English mezzo-soprano. She studied in London, making her début in 1955 with Sadler’s Wells Opera as Olga (Yevgeny Onegin) and singing with the company until 1973, as Dorabella, Rosina, the Composer (Ariadne auf Naxos), Offenbach’s Helen and Boulotte, Rosalind, which she created in ...

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John Baily

(b Guildford, Oct 22, 1928; d Belfast, Jan 24, 1990). British anthropologist and ethnomusicologist. Raised in the Anglican environment of Salisbury Cathedral close, his father, the cathedral architect, was closely concerned with the restoration of the Sarum rite and with the Dolmetsch early music revival. Blacking served as a commissioned officer in the Coldstream Guards, with active service in Malaya (...

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Gareth Dylan Smith

(b Yellow Springs, OH, Nov 18, 1959). American drummer. She was raised in Connecticut among a family of eclectic musicians and music-lovers. At the age of eight she decided to become a drummer. She played in school ensembles and a local fife-and-drum corps before studying classical percussion at the University of Hartford and jazz at the Berklee College of Music. From ...

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John H. Baron

(b Bennington, VT, 1826; d New Orleans, Oct 28, 1888). American music publisher. He worked as a music teacher in Huntsville, Alabama (1845–52), and Jackson, Louisiana (1852–5). In 1858 he joined E.D. Patton’s music shop in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which he bought out the following year with his younger brother Henry (...

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Ian D. Bent

(fl c1261). English singer. One of three Englishmen described by the late 13th-century theorist Anonymus 4 as ‘good singers’ of mensural polyphony, who sang with great refinement (‘valde deliciose’). The theorist referred to him as ‘Blakesmit, at the court of the late King Henry [III]’. He was clerk of the king's chapel in ...