61-80 of 2,068 results  for:

  • 16th c./High Renaissance (1500-1600) x
Clear all

Article

(fl Heidelberg, 1511). German composer. He was a colleague of Sebastian Virdung at Heidelberg, and Virdung’s treatise Musica getutscht (1511) is presented as a dialogue between the author and Andreas. The sole source of his music is Glareanus’ Dodecachordon, which includes the Kyrie and Osanna of his ...

Article

(b Stryków; d Kraków, 1577). Polish printer. He took over the printing house of Hieronim Wietor on the latter’s death.

Article

Frank Dobbins

(b Bourges, c1510; d Lyons, June 1561). French writer. After studying at the University of Bourges he was appointed professor of rhetoric at the Collège de la Trinité in Lyons before 1538, becoming principal in 1540. He was murdered as a suspected Protestant during a riot in Lyons. Among other writings, especially on poetics, he wrote several plays with important musical content. The ...

Article

Klaus Fischer

(b Rome, c1560; d Rome, 26/Sept 7, 1614). Italian composer, elder brother of Giovanni Francesco Anerio.

Anerio spent his entire life in Rome. From 23 December 1568 until December 1574 he was a choirboy at S Maria Maggiore, where from ...

Article

Thomas W. Bridges

(b ?Venice; flVicenza and Venice, 1562–1604). Italian printer and music publisher. He was possibly related to the Parisian publishers Abel and Arnoul Angelier. He printed books in Venice sporadically from 1562 until 1570, when he apparently acquired the printing shop of Claudio Merulo...

Article

Iain Fenlon

(b Gubbio; fl 1583–92). Italian composer. From the dedication of his first book of five-voice madrigals it is clear that he had previously been employed by Ottavio Accoromboni, Bishop of Fossombrone. The contents, mostly cast in the fashionable canzonetta style, make much use of stock madrigalisms including ‘eye-music’ and changes of mensuration for representational purposes. The remaining two books are dedicated to another patron, Cardinal Scipione Gonzaga, who is known to have had strong musical and literary interests. The dedication of the ...

Article

Richard J. Agee

In 

See Gardano family

Article

Kenneth Elliott

(fl 1543–95). Scottish composer. Generally described as ‘conventuall brether of the Abbay of Dunfermling’, he is mentioned in a charter of 1543 dealing with the transaction of land at Carberry. In 1562, shortly after the Reformation, he was appointed to the vicarage of Crieff, but probably remained at Dunfermline, teaching at the song school there. In general, after the Reformation in Scotland monks were not dislodged from an abbey, but suppression or secularization of the order took place after the death of the brethren. Up to the 1580s Angus received various pensions and benefices, and in ...

Article

Lewis Lockwood and Noel O’Regan

(b Florence, c1520; d Rome, cMarch 20, 1571). Italian composer.

His birth and early training at Florence are attested to by the contemporary writer Michele Poccianti. Einstein inferred from his first published compositions, the two volumes of madrigals (Venice, 1547–51), that Animuccia's early works were influenced by Francesco Corteccia, court composer to Duke Cosimo I de' Medici. Two ...

Article

Lewis Lockwood

(b ?Florence, c1500; d Padua, 8–20 Oct 1569). Italian composer. Poccianti claimed that he was the brother of Giovanni Animuccia; although no other source confirms this relationship, there is no reason to doubt his authority. Paolo Animuccia must have spent his early years at Florence, but the first documented evidence of his musical activity is at Rome in ...

Article

Robert Stevenson

(b nr Coimbra, c1526; d Landim, nr Vila Nova de Famalição, June 14, 1603). Portuguese ecclesiastic. About 1550 he became an Augustinian canon at the priory of S Cruz, Coimbra. Pinto credited him during the 1550s with the compilation of an important anthology (...

Article

William F. Prizer

(b c1470; d 1524). Sienese composer, singer and priest. Ansanus can now be identified as Sano di Goro, the son of a Sienese wool shearer, who is first recorded as a clerk in the cathedral of Siena in March 1484. He joined the chapel as a chorister in ...

Article

William F. Prizer

(b ?Padua; fl 1505–14). Italian composer. He is probably identifiable with the ‘Honophrius Patavinus’ of Petrucci’s sixth and eleventh books of frottolas. His frottolas consist of nine barzellette, two ode, a ballata and a strambotto, the last, Se un pone un fragil vetro...

Article

Keith Polk

In 

See Schubinger

Article

Martin Picker

(b ?Venice, fl early 16th century). Italian composer. 15 frottolas and 2 laudi are attributed to ‘A. de Antiquis’ (sometimes abbreviated to ‘A. de A.’) in the collections of Ottaviano Petrucci and Andrea Antico. Petrucci appended ‘Venetus’ to Antiquis's name in Frottole libro quinto...

Article

Donna G. Cardamone

(b Corato; d Bari, after 1608). Italian composer and anthologist. Antiquis was associated with the basilica of S Nicola, Bari, for most of his career, first as cleric (from 1565), then as canon and choirmaster. From 1606 to 1608 he was chaplain and singing teacher of the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo in Naples. His two anthologies of ...

Article

(b Fabrica, nr Viterbo; d probably at Rome, ? in or before 1629) Italian composer and teacher. According to Casimiri he must have taught music at the Seminario Romano, Rome, some time between 1602 and 1606. The first post he held that is specifically documented is that of ...

Article

See Gardano family

Article

See Carreira family

Article

See Carreira family