61-80 of 724 results  for:

  • Idiophones (Instrument Body Percussion) x
Clear all

Article

Asok  

Vessel rattle of the Pahuin of Cameroon and Gabon. The rattle can be made of any convenient container filled with pebbles or seeds, or a dried fruit shell containing seeds.

Article

Laurence Libin

Water drum of the Tuareg people of Niger. A hollowed half calabash floats open-side down in a large bowl of water (the bowl can be another calabash, a bucket, or another container) and is beaten by women using sticks, finger rings, sandals, spoons, or other implements....

Article

Assogi  

Rattle of the Ndasa and Mbamba of the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Article

Cuban rattle usually made from a perforated tin container with tapered conical ends, to which a handle of wood or metal is fastened. It is used in the Arará cult.

H. Courlander: ‘Musical Instruments of Cuba’, MQ, vol.28 (1942), 227–40.

Article

Concussion rattles of the Ashanti people of Ghana.

Article

Atang  

Brass clapper bell of the Igede people of Nigeria. Although it is a European-style handbell, it has been incorporated into some traditional instrumental ensembles.

Article

Henry Johnson

Japanese saucer-shaped gong. It has a flat face about 9 to 15 cm in diameter and a perpendicular wall about 3 to 5 cm deep that angles outward to form a rim around the opening. The face normally has concentric grooves. The term atarigane, which is often used interchangeably with the term ...

Article

Atoke  

Jeremy Montagu

Trough-shaped clapperless iron bell of the Ewe people of Ghana. It is rested on the palm of the hand and struck with an iron rod or nail, normally in an ostinato to provide a reference pattern in polyrhythmic music. High- and low-pitched types exist.

Article

Michel Domenichni-Ramiaramanana

Modern term for a free-bar xylophone found in southeastern Madagascar among the Antandroy, Bara, Mahafaly, Masikoro, Sakalava, and Vezo peoples. The instrument has Southeast Asian origins. It is also known locally as katiboky, kilangay, or valihambalo. It can have up to 12 bars but only five or seven are normally used in a performance. It is played by women. One woman supports the instrument with her legs. She plays a melody while another woman plays an ostinato. The instrument was traditionally used in magico-religious ceremonies, but it is now used for secular purposes, except among the Bara. It is often played at dusk, or to encourage young children to dance....

Article

Mervyn McLean

Stamping tube set of the ‘Are’are people of Malaita, Solomon Islands. Among the neighbouring Kwarekwareo they are called ‘au ni wado. A set consists of ten bamboo tubes 13 to 46 cm long, closed by a node at the lower end. Unlike the kiro stamping tubes which accompany singing, they are carefully tuned to a pentatonic scale. A single musician sits on the ground or on a low seat, legs spread. On the ground between his thighs he places a stone against which he strikes the tubes of his choice, held four in each hand. Between the two largest toes of each foot he wedges one of the two remaining tubes, which he strikes on smaller stones, one by each foot. Alternatively the tubes may be shared among two or three musicians, in which case the ensemble may increase to 12 with each player holding two tubes in each hand. The simultaneous and alternate striking of the tubes produces a sound like a xylophone....

Article

Stamping tube of Cuba. Of Yoruba origin, it is used in funerary rites for high-ranking Santería dignitaries to awaken or evoke the spirit of the deceased. It is more than 1 metre long and can have a small carved head at the top, symbol of the Égún or collective spirit of the dead....

Article

Aze  

Rattle of the Edo-speaking people of Nigeria.

Article

Small metal pellet bells of the Jola people of Senegal. They are wound around the arm or waist of girl dancers, or around the waist of atuma wrestlers.

Article

Bagwase  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Struck metal idiophone of the Bangba people in the Uele region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is the blade of an axe or hoe and is used in dance music with gúdúgúdú and ndima drums.

See also Gúdúgúdú ; Ndima .

Article

Patricia Matusky

Xylophone of the Murut people of Sabah, Malaysia. The bakakong has as many as ten graduated bars made of bamboo sections cut in half lengthwise. The bars are bound together in raft-like fashion and set over a wooden frame that serves as a resonator. They are struck with a pair of wooden sticks by a player seated on the floor....

Article

Bake  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Percussion beam of the Tsogho people of Gabon. The hardwood beam is about 1.5 to 2 m long and 23 to 25 cm thick. It rests on two supports and is struck with wooden sticks by two players. It is an important idiophone in ritual ensembles....

Article

Andrew C. McGraw

The particular types of gamelan of Bali, Indonesia; commonly distinguished from Javanese gamelan. Although many ethnomusicologists have categorized gamelan using a taxonomy developed by the Balinese state conservatory, which distinguishes ensembles as ‘old, middle, and new’ (kuno, madya, baru), definitive evidence regarding the emergence of pre-20th-century ensembles is lacking. Authors have alternatively attempted to categorize ensembles by their ceremonial and social function. However, new social and aesthetic contexts have shifted prior associations; practically all extant ensembles now appear in tourist, state, religious, and experimental contexts. Ultimately it might be simplest to organize the ensembles organologically. For information on individual instruments see separate entries. For bibliography ...

Article

José Maceda

Bamboo instrument of the Kalinga people of the northern Philippines, combining elements of an idiophone and aerophone. It is called pahinghing or paginggeng by the Isneg and pakkung by the Ibaloy. A slot divides the upper half of the thin bamboo tube (about 40 cm long and 3 cm in diameter), and these halves are shaved and shaped into slender tongues. The lower part of the tube is split partway down as a continuation of the slot. When the tongues are struck against the heel of one hand, the split allows them to vibrate and buzz. A small hole at the base of the split is closed or opened by the thumb (or third finger) of the holding hand, altering the length of the air column of the tube and thus the pitch of the buzz. The ...

Article

Balingi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Log xylophone of the Uele region, Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has seven or eight bars set across two logs, usually banana trunks, sometimes placed over a pit for resonance. Among the Lika, Zande, and Budu peoples the bars are separated by pegs driven into the logs; the Ngbandi and Sango drive the pegs through holes in the bars. Tuning is done by scraping the underside of each bar. According to the pitch, the bars are designated as ...

Article

Jeremy Montagu

Aboriginal log idiophone of Arnhem Land in northern Australia. It is a naturally hollowed log about 1.5 m long and 20 cm in diameter, struck in secret ritual ceremonies reserved for initiated men. It is also known as banagaga and by other names.