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American professional organization that began as a committee of the Music Educators National Conference (MENC). The Committee on College and University Music, under the leadership of William Revelli, met independently in Chicago in 1938. The group met again in December 1941 and formed the University and College Band Conductors Conference, an organization dedicated to serve the interests of bandmasters teaching in institutions above the high school level. A Declaration of Principles was formulated, principally by Mark Hindsley, by which the members dedicate themselves to the teaching, performance, study and cultivation of music, with particular focus on the wind band medium. The name of the organization was changed to the College Band Directors National Association in ...

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Rita H. Mead

American organization established in 1957 to provide a forum for addressing interdisciplinary issues within music in higher education and for examining broader educational concerns. Membership is open to teachers of music in colleges, universities and conservatories in the USA and Canada. The society sponsors annual meetings with symposia and concerts and publishes a newsletter and a biannual journal, the ...

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London college founded in 1864 and renamed the Royal College of Organists in 1893; see London, §VIII, 4.

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College of the School of English Church Music (later the Royal School of Church Music) opened at Chislehurst, Kent, in 1929. See London, §VIII, 4.

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Dee Baily

Official or traditional songs sung at ceremonial, festive, or athletic events to generate enthusiasm and school spirit, or to support the school’s sports teams. They include “alma maters” (or school anthems; the Latin term alma mater, meaning “benign mother,” is frequently applied by alumni to their school or college), “fight” songs, and nostalgic songs....

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Joelle L. Lien

State university with campuses in Boulder, Denver, and Colorado Springs. The main campus at Boulder was founded in 1876. In 1892 music was established as a department in the College of Liberal Arts, later named the College of Arts and Sciences (1920). The College of Music was established and began offering a bachelor of music degree in ...

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Privately endowed university in New York with an important department of music and library; see New york , and Libraries and collections.

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American organization founded in 1975 under the aegis of the American Symphony Orchestra League; it became independent in 1985. The guild is devoted to advancing the art of conducting and to serving the artistic and professional needs of its members. Its journal, published twice a year, includes scholarly articles on the history and craft of conducting, as well as lists of errata in the scores and parts of standard orchestral and choral works. The guild also publishes the quarterly ...

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Carolyn Livingston

American in-service music teacher education program funded by the Ford Foundation. Classes were held on university campuses and focused on comprehensive musicianship and developing musical creativity (1959–73). The Contemporary Music Project for Creativity in Music Education was a spinoff from the Young Composers Project....

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Nina Davis-Millis and David G. Tovey

Private university in Ithaca, New York, founded in 1865. During the 1800s music at Cornell consisted of extracurricular performing groups which were often student led and whose aims were more social than musical. Music was not seen as a truly academic discipline until the arrival in ...

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Educational institution in Seattle; music has been taught there since its founding in 1914 (originally as the Cornish School of Allied Arts).

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One of the foremost conservatories of music in the United States, founded in 1924; see Philadelphia and Libraries and collections.

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Conservatory founded in 1924 in Philadelphia. See Philadelphia, §6.

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Alan L. Spurgeon

Professional organization for Dalcroze teachers. The organization promotes the artistic and pedagogical principles of Emile Jacques-Dalcroze (1865–1950), a Swiss composer and teacher whose approach to music education consists of three components: eurythmics, which teaches concepts of rhythm, structure, and musical expression through movement; solfége, which develops an understanding of pitch, scale, and tonality through activities emphasizing aural comprehension and vocal improvisation; and improvisation, which develops an understanding of form and meaning through spontaneous musical creation using movement, voice, and instruments. Dalcroze intended that the three subjects be intertwined so that the development of the inner ear, an internal muscular sense, and creative expression might work together to form the core of basic musicianship. The Dalcroze Society of America began to take shape in ...

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A combination of advanced coaching, musical holiday and concert festival organized each summer at Dartington Hall, an arts and education centre near Totnes, Devon. It was established in 1947 as Bryanston Summer School and was held at Bryanston School, Dorset; it was registered the following year as a non-profit-distributing company, and it moved to Dartington in ...

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Denise M.M. Dalphond

Form of electronic music that originated in Detroit among African American youth in the early 1980s. Local black radio, house and block parties, DJ crews, and such musical influences as German electronic rock, Italo disco, electro funk, and electronic art music formed the foundation of what eventually became a globally recognized form of electronic dance music. Detroit techno is characterized by repeating, syncopated rhythms typically in common time (4/4) with tempos ranging from 120 to 150 beats per minute. The sounds produced by early analog synthesizers as well as the Roland TR-909 drum machine are also distinguishing features....

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College in San Rafael, California, USA, near San Francisco. Its American Music Research Center holds an important music collection. See San Francisco, §5.

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Josef Häusler

Town in Germany. It was noted in the 20th century for its festival of contemporary music. It was the home of the Fürstenbergs from 1488; they maintained a court chapel and opera which achieved particularly high standards during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and employed musicians such as J.W. Kalliwoda, J.A. Sixt, Joseph Fiala and Conradin Kreutzer. The works of Mozart, Dittersdorf, Umlauf and J.A. Hiller were particularly popular there and Italian works by Cimarosa, Gazzaniga, Piccinni, Sarti, Salieri and Paisiello were frequently heard. It became an internationally known centre for contemporary music between ...

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Johan Kolsteeg

Dutch organization based in Amsterdam. It was set up in 1947 with assistance from the Stichting Nederlandse Muziekbelangen (Foundation for Netherlands Musical Interests) and central government, with the aim of documenting and publishing modern Dutch music. This move was prompted by the loss of a number of scores, including some by Willem Pijper, in the bombing of Rotterdam in ...

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London theatre used in the 17th century for productions with music. See London, §V, 1.