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Philip Lieson Miller

(b Mt Clemens, MI, Dec 6, 1889; d Chicago, IL, Oct 16, 1981). American pianist and accompanist. He was one of 11 children, all musical. His early years were spent in Chicago where he studied cello and piano. He graduated from the Chicago Musical College at 18 and taught there from ...

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Theophil Antonicek

(b ?Milan, c1644; d Vienna, Sept 22, 1685). Italian composer and musician. He is first heard of in a letter of 6 September 1671 in which the Prince-Bishop of Olomouc, Karl Liechtenstein-Kastelkorn, told J.H. Schmelzer that he need not have apologized for some apparent bad behaviour on Albertini’s part, since he himself in any case had a good opinion of him. At the time of his death (he was murdered) Albertini was chamber musician in Vienna to the dowager Empress Eleonora. He himself prepared for publication his printed collection of sonatas and signed the dedication to Leopold I, but it did not appear until seven years after his death (the delay may have been due to the cost of engraving, towards which the emperor had granted a subsidy as early as ...

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Barbara Chmara-Żackiewicz

(b Pesaro, Nov 30, 1748; d Warsaw, March 27, 1812). Italian composer and conductor, active in Poland. The earliest reference to his activities in Warsaw dates from 12 April 1773, when King Stanisław August Poniatowski paid him a fee for a concert. From the middle of ...

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Winton Dean

(fl 1699–1738). Italian alto castrato. His first known appearance was in Livorno in 1699. Probably from Florence, he had a long career there, singing in 24 operas, including works by Orlandini, Gasparini and Albinoni, 1701–38. He was employed by the Cardinal and later the Grand Duchess of Tuscany. He sang in Venice in ...

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Alina Nowak-Romanowicz

(b Pesaro, Nov 30, 1748; d Warsaw, March 27, 1812). Polish composer of Italian birth . He was known as an aria composer and ‘young virtuoso’ in 1777. Later he was conductor at Prince Karol Radziwiłł’s residence at Nieśwież, and from 1782 maître de chapelle...

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Jiří Sehnal

(b c1660; d Olomouc, Oct 3, 1735). German composer. After 1690 he came to Olomouc from Vienna and entered the services of the Olomouc chapter; in 1691 he became musical director at the cathedral. In 1696 he married Magdalena Cecilie Zindel, daughter of the cathedral organist. Although his salary was raised from 100 to 300 florins by ...

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Christopher Raeburn and Dorothea Link

In 

See Mandini family

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Trudi Ann Wright

(b Boston, MA, 1927). American contralto. She studied singing at the Longy School of Music, earning a performance certificate, and also at Tanglewood. In 1946 she made her professional debut with Koussevitzky and the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood as a soloist in Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. She continued to appear with them through the early 1950s....

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Nikolai Paulsen

(b Trondheim, July 27, 1919). Norwegian composer, organist and teacher. A qualified architect (1943), he studied the organ with Ludvig Nielsen, Arild Sandvold and Per Stenberg, and also had lessons with Tarp in Copenhagen, Ralph Downes in London and Jelinek in Vienna. He worked as an organist in Trondheim (...

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Edward Booth

(b Lauingen, Swabia, c1195; d Cologne, Nov 15, 1280). German theologian, canonized in 1931. While studying at Padua he joined the Dominican order (1222–3). He taught principally at the Dominican Studium Generale, Cologne, where Thomas Aquinas was his pupil. Although he did not create the scholastic union of theology and philosophy that Thomas achieved, he brought together the scriptures, the Church Fathers, earlier medieval scripture exegesis and scholastic writings, as well as much of the newly accessible writings of Aristotle and Arab philosophers. In addition his intense interest in scientific observation and experiment expressed itself in his specifically scientific works, as well as in innumerable remarks elsewhere in his writings. He rejected music of the spheres as ‘ridiculous’, on the grounds that if it existed it would be more destructive and unbearable than thunder, and that observation showed that the movement of the heavens could not generate sound (...

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Sarah Fuller

(fl 1146–1177). French cantor. He was probably from Estampes originally, but from about 1146 to 1177 he was cantor at Notre Dame, Paris. He left a substantial bequest of liturgical books to the cathedral. The sole, uncorroborated, trace of his compositional activity is a two-voice conductus, ...

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Max Loppert

(b Harpenden, June 4, 1952). English director . Born into a distinguished theatrical family (his father was the impresario Donald Albery) he first gained a reputation in the British regional and avant-garde theatre with distinctive modern reappraisals of the classics marked by a cool, highly refined sense of visual style. His first opera production was of ...

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Rudolf A. Rasch

(b ?Bieswangen, Bavaria, c1660; d c?1730). Dutch composer and violinist of German extraction. The name Henricus Albicastro is a Latin-Italian translation of his true name, Johann Heinrich von Weissenburg. The designation ‘del Biswang’ on the title-pages of some of his works presumably refers to Bieswangen as his place of birth (there is, moreover, a town called Weissenburg nearby). There is nothing to corroborate Walther's statement that he was Swiss, but many details about his life are still unclear. His compositions adhere closely to the Italian style in string music with continuo, but there is no way of telling whether this results from study with an Italian composer in Italy or elsewhere, or from the study of Italian music available north of the Alps....

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Hans Klotz

(b Stuttgart, May 12, 1938; d 1984). German organ builder. Born into a family of organ builders once active in the vicinity of Waldhut, he was trained by the firm of Walcker, followed by Rieger in Schwarzach (Vorarlberg), for whom he didSeit 1960...

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Adrienne Simpson, Jiťrenka Pešková and Jernej Weiss

In 

See Mašek family

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Christiane Spieth-Weissenbacher and José A. Bowen

(b Beausoleil, Alpes Maritimes, Sept 30, 1920). French conductor and cellist. He studied the cello with Umberto Benedetti, and attended the Paris Conservatoire until the age of 15. He returned there after the war to follow courses in fugue with Noël Gallon, composition with Büsser and Milhaud and analysis and musical aesthetics with Messiaen. He also studied conducting with Roger Desormière, Carl Schuricht and Hans Rosbaud. He began his career as a cellist, touring and recording both as a soloist and with the pianist Claude Helffer from ...

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Nigel Fortune

(b Moncalieri, nr Turin, probably between 1580 and 1590; d 1626 or later). Italian composer and musician. He came of a long-established family whose members had included painters and a royal doctor. He became a musician in the service of the court of Savoy at Turin. In ...

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Ivan Zivanović

(b Županja, Dec 10, 1869; d Zagreb, April 18, 1933). Croatian composer, conductor and publisher. In Graz he studied music, where, in keeping with the family tradition, he was also required to finish business college. From 1893 to 1895 he was conductor at the joint theatres of the Graz municipality. He then conducted opera at the new theatre in Zagreb (the Croatian National Theatre) until ...

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Michael Talbot

(b Venice, June 8, 1671; d Venice, Jan 17, 1750/51). Italian composer. His father, Antonio Albinoni, was a stationer and manufacturer of playing cards who owned several shops in Venice and some landed property. As well as completing his apprenticeship as a stationer, Tomaso, the eldest son, learnt the violin and took singing lessons; his teachers are not known. Despite his talent he was not tempted on reaching adulthood to seek a post in church or court, preferring to remain a ...

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Curtis Price

Opera in three acts by Luis Grabu to a libretto by John Dryden ; London, Dorset Garden Theatre, early June 1685.

In 1680–81 the reign of Charles II was gravely threatened by the Exclusion Crisis, an attempt by certain members of Parliament to block the succession of his brother, James, Duke of York, a Roman Catholic. With the defeat of the Exclusionists and the foiling of plots to assassinate him, Charles II requested ‘something at least like an Opera’ to celebrate his deliverance and the continuation of the Stuart line. The actor-manager Thomas Betterton was despatched to Paris in ...