81-100 of 57,904 results

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(a) Waveform produced by a treble recorder sounding c′′ (523 Hz) played rather loudly; (b) the same note bowed on a violin; (c) the same note on a clarinet; (d) waveform made by mixing a group of high-pitched tones, none below about 2000 Hz, producing an apparent c′′ in the ear as a ‘residue’ effect...

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(a) Waves alternately in and out of phase, giving rise to the ‘beat’ phenomenon; (b) waveform of two notes exactly an octave apart, giving a smooth and steady impression; (c) waveforms of notes not quite an octave apart, ‘changing step’; in each case the lowest graph is the sum of the other two...

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(a) Xylophone and (b) gourd-resonated lamellophone of the Cokwe people, Katanga region; (c) slit-drum (left), two drums with nailed heads, and basket rattles (right), Yaka people, Kwango region

Photo: Declerck, J., © Africa-Museum

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(a) Zampogna with blowpipe, two chanters and two drones, Italian (Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford); (b) zampogna player: detail from ‘The Shepherds’, fresco from the cycle ‘Life and Glory of the Virgin’ by Ludovico Seitz, 1892–1902 (Cappella Tedesca, S Casa, Loreto

Mansell / Time Pix / Katz...

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(a)–(c) Calculated curves for pure tones of the 2nd, 4th and 5th harmonics of the same fundamental; (d) sum of the three

After C. Taylor, "The Physics of Musical Sounds", 1965

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Jean M. Bonin

Firm of music publishers. It was founded in New Haven in 1962 by Gary J.N. Aamodt and Clyde Rykken to provide modern critical editions of music of historical interest and artistic integrity for scholars, students, and performers of Western art music. The “Recent Researches” series were launched in ...

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A. Pitch symbols by permission of Julia Logothetis

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A.F.O  

Val Wilmer

Organization and record label formed in New Orleans in 1961 by the alto saxophonist and arranger Harold Battiste, Jr. He and the other board members – Peter Badie, John Boudreaux, Jr., Melvin Lastie, Alvin “Red” Tyler, the pianist Allen Toussaint, and the guitarist Roy Montrell – sought to retain control of their music by organizing their own recording sessions and keeping the profits within the African-American musicians’ community. They produced a number of popular recordings, including the hit ...

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a: Gamelan ensembles and instrumentation

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(b Oss, March 10, 1970). Dutch composer. He trained first as a recording engineer at The Hague Royal Conservatory, taking additional lessons in classical guitar with Antonio Pereira Arias, then went on to study composition with Andriessen family, §3, Gilius van Bergeijk and ...

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Aachen  

Rudolf Pohl

City in Germany. The cathedral and its music were the creation of Charlemagne (742–814), who made the town the northern capital of the Holy Roman Empire; the Holy Roman emperors were crowned there from 813 to 1531. The city was occupied by France in 1794...

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John Bergsagel and Ole Kongsted

(fl 1593–1625). Danish composer and organist. He was appointed organist of Vor Frue Kirke (now the cathedral), Copenhagen, on 23 June 1593 after having ‘pursued and learnt his art during a long period both in Germany and Italy’. He received a number of preferments, such as the free residence formerly set aside for the palace preacher, awarded to him in ...

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Pekka Gronow

(bKouvola, Finland, Dec 12, 1935). Finnishtenor and alto saxophonist and flutist. He learned to play guitar and tenor saxophone during his years of schooling and army service, and spent three years in Sweden without playing; after returning to Finland he took up baritone saxophone, then changed to the alto instrument. He studied flute at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki and later spent a period in Boston at the Berklee College of Music. In the 1950s he played in a sextet led by the trumpeter Heikki Rosendahl in Inkeroinen. He moved to Helsinki in ...

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Aangún  

Brian Diettrich

Nose flute from the islands of Chuuk, Micronesia. It is made from bamboo or mangrove root. Similar bamboo nose flutes have been documented for the atolls surrounding Chuuk, with instruments reported in the Mortlock Islands (there called áttik), as well as on Pollap, Polowat (...

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Bonnie J. Blackburn

(b Florence, c1480; d after 1545). Italian theorist and composer. Nothing is known of Aaron's early training, his teacher, or his career before 1516. He claims to have had ‘the greatest friendship and familiarity’ with Josquin, Obrecht, Isaac and Agricola in Florence (most likely between ...

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Aaron Copland with Lukas Foss and Elliott Carter.

Lebrecht Music and Arts

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Michel Huglo

(b ?Scotland, late 10th century; d Cologne, Nov 18, 1052). ?Scottish Benedictine abbot and music theorist. The date of his death (the 14th day before the calends of December 1052) is known from Hartzheim, who had access to local documents now lost. He was Abbot of St Martin in Cologne (Cologne like Laon and Liège attracted many Irish and Scots from the 9th century onwards) and at the same time (...

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(bToronto, Jan 27, 1910; dCanada, Nov 1970). Americanreed player. He played alto saxophone and in 1942 recorded with Jack Teagarden. After moving to Hollywood he performed and recorded with the bandleaders Horace Heidt (1943–5, 1948–9) and Skinnay Ennis (...

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Thomas Owens

(bPittsburgh, March 23, 1932). Americantrumpeter and flugelhorn player. He studied music in Pittsburgh (1947–50), Evanston, Illinois (with Renold Schilke of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, 1951–3), and at Wayne State University, Detroit (mid-1950s), where he worked for seven nights a week in the band at the Flame Show Bar. From ...

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Abadá  

John M. Schechter

Obscure drum, presumably of African origin, of the Babasué (Babassuê) syncretic sect of Belem, Pará, Brazil. It might be related to the atabaque. The body is slightly conical and the single head is secured by a hoop that is laced to four iron hooks that jut from the body below the upper rim. ...