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Jeffrey Holmes

(b Auckland, New Zealand, April 23, 1947). American pianist, composer, and arranger of New Zealand birth. He was classically trained but developed a voracious appetite for jazz as a teenager and enrolled in the Berklee College of Music in 1966 to study composition and arranging. On weekends he traveled to New York for lessons with ...

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Warren A. Bebbington

(b Melbourne, Dec 12, 1952). Australian composer. Raised in a Salvation Army family where he played band instruments, he took an arts course at Monash University before studying composition with Donald Freund at Memphis State University and with Sculthorpe at the University of Sydney. In ...

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Bruce Johnson and Roger T. Dean

(b Adelaide, Australia, Jan 5, 1926; d Sarasota, FL, October 28, 2010). Australian vibraphonist, drummer, arranger, composer, and bandleader. He was playing xylophone by the age of six and later studied piano and drums; he became interested in jazz while serving in an RAAF entertainment unit (...

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Paul Webb

(b Broken Hill, Feb 26, 1929; d Sydney, Jan 25, 2005). Australian soprano. She won a singing competition in Australia and in 1952 moved to England to further her career, first studying with Dino Borgioli, then joining the Sadler’s Wells Opera company in ...

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Roger T. Dean

(b Moscow, June 12, 1946). Australian saxophonist of Russian Jewish birth. A jazz musician by the age of 15, he left the USSR in 1972, having played and recorded with many contemporary Soviet musicians. He worked in Israel, and then came to prominence in Australia (where he took citizenship in ...

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Richard Toop

(b Sydney, Jan 7, 1953). Australian composer. He initially trained as a pharmacist, his first serious musical studies, as a guitarist, beginning in 1975. Attending Kagel's composition seminar in Basel in 1977 stimulated him to pursue a career as a composer; he subsequently studied with Richard Toop at the Sydney Conservatorium (...

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Tony Gould

(b Melbourne, Australia, Dec 29, 1933). Australian composer, tenor and soprano saxophonist, and bandleader. He was self-taught as a musician. He formed his first group, a quintet, in 1956, and this quickly became prominent in Australian experimental jazz. Later he led and composed for a number of ensembles, and he recorded numerous albums from ...

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Adrian Jackson

(b Deniliquin, Australia, July 28, 1944). Australian drummer and bandleader. He began playing traditional jazz with the Red Onions Jazz Band (1960–c1975), which was popular in Melbourne, and toured Europe in 1967 and 1970. From 1970 he explored modern jazz styles, working with the saxophonist Ken Schroder, Vince Jones, and Paul Grabowsky, among others. He also performed with Phil Woods, Milt Jackson, Mal Waldron, Johnny Griffin, Art Hodes, Jay McShann, Wild Bill Davison, and Jimmy Witherspoon. In ...

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Desmond Shawe-Taylor

(b Geelong, Australia, Jan 7, 1901; d New York, NY, Jan 10, 1969). Australian baritone. After studying in Melbourne and Paris, he made his London debut in 1926, at Dame Nellie Melba’s farewell appearance at Covent Garden. From 1927 to 1936 he was a prominent member of the Paris Opéra. He also sang at Glyndbourne and toured widely....

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Malcolm Gillies

(b Melbourne, June 18, 1933). Australian composer. After undergraduate studies at the University of Melbourne (BMus, 1956) and a spell of teaching in Australia, he undertook advanced compositional studies in Spain, England (with Goehr), and Italy (1962–4). In 1964 he was appointed to a lecturership at the University of Queensland, where he later became senior lecturer, then reader. In ...

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Raymond Ammann

Transverse flute of the northern Pentecost Island, Vanuatu. In central Pentecost it is called bua bangro. Codrington was the first to mention the instrument and it was probably he who gave it the name ‘double flute’. He refers to the island of Ambae, where the instrument is called ...

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J.M. Thomson

( b Christchurch, Sept 28, 1945). New Zealand composer and teacher . The second of six daughters, she grew up in an intensely musical environment. She graduated from the University of Canterbury in 1967. In 1973 she founded the influential Christchurch music workshops, and later formed and directed the Centre Sound choral group. She gained a teaching diploma in ...

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Noël Goodwin

(b Glasgow, March 15, 1954). Scottish soprano . She studied at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. In 1975 she joined the Australian Opera on a three-year contract, making her début as Pamina and also singing Countess Almaviva, Micaëla and Gilda. Her British début was at Glyndebourne in ...

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Roger T. Dean

(b Sydney, Dec 26, 1962). Australian drummer, electronics performer, and composer. At the age of 17 he went to the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music, but he soon deferred his studies to tour Australia with the rock band Ayers Rock. He then worked with Great White Noise and with Sandy Evans in Women and Children First and performed and recorded with Vince Jones, the groups Tango Bravo, Wizards of Oz, and Wa Wa Nee, and many musicians visiting Australia. In ...

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J.B. Steane

(b Blenheim, New Zealand, March 16, 1881; d London, Dec 31, 1948). New Zealand soprano. She studied in England, at the Birmingham and Midland School of Music, returned home because of ill-health, and made her début in Australia with the Melba Grand Opera Company in ...

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Bue  

Raymond Ammann

Idiophone of Vanuatu. It is a bundle of dried bamboo struckto accompanydance. Bue in many languages of Vanuatu means‘bamboo’, and the term is often part of the name of panpipes and slit drums made from bamboo. On many islands several bamboo stalks 3 to 4 metres long lie on the flooror are set in forked sticks; in the latter case, the musicians can stand while striking the ...

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Raymond Ammann

Raft panpipe of Ambae in Vanuatu. Bue means ‘bamboo’ and balabala means ‘arranging in a line’. The name of the raft panpipe on the neighbouring island, Pentecost, with a very similar culture and language as northeast Ambae, is buabava. R.H. Codrington: The Melanesians: Studies in their Anthropology and Folk-Lore...

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Harold Rosenthal

(b Melbourne, Jan 28, 1883; d St Albans, Jan 25, 1970). Australian conductor . He studied in London with August Wilhelmj and in Leipzig with Arthur Nikisch. After engagements in Breslau and Görlitz he settled in England and was engaged by the Moody-Manners Opera Company (...

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Bui  

Bullroarer of the Mawai people, Northern Province, Papua New Guinea, used for initiation ceremonies.

A.C. Haddon: ‘Migration of Cultures in British New Guinea’, Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, vol.1 (1920), 237–80.

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Roger T. Dean

(b Boskovice, Czechoslovakia [now Czech Republic], Dec 5, 1944). Australian trumpeter, composer, and leader of Czech birth. He began playing piano when he was seven and trumpet when he was 12, and by the age of 15 he was working in dance bands. After study at the conservatory in Prague and working in festivals in Europe, he moved in ...