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Tiziana Morsanuto

(fl 1566–8). Composer active in Italy. His known works comprise six madrigals in two anthologies edited by Giulio Bonagiunta: five for four voices (in RISM 1566²) and one for five voices (in 1568¹6). Though his name suggests Italian origin, it is possible that he can be identified with the Flemish musician Adriano Haville who occasionally served Guidubaldo II della Rovere, Duke of Urbino. Bonagiunta was himself a native of nearby S Ginesio, as was the poet Annibale Caro to whose memory one of the anthologies (...

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Alexander Silbiger

Italian family of musicians, teachers and composers. 14 members of this Neapolitan family over four generations were active in the late 16th century and up to the middle of the 17th, notably as wind players. Many of them were employed in the royal chapel at Naples, and several members of the third generation taught in the city’s conservatories. The three members of this generation discussed below, of whom the first and third at least were cousins, were also composers; all three, together with at least one other member of the family, died as a result of the plague of ...

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Jürg Stenzl

(b Berching, nr Eichstätt, c1500; d Berne, aut. 1554). German music printer and publisher. He settled in Basle, where he worked as a bookbinder and was given citizenship on 3 April 1527, having been admitted to the Saffran Guild on 10 December 1525...

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(b c1480–88; d after 1558). South Netherlandish composer and singer. The earliest known archival documents mention him in 1518 as a singer and in 1519 as the choirmaster at St Jacob in Bruges. After 1519, contemporary publications by Attaingnant and Moderne are the only source of evidence of his activity until ...

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Roger Bowers

(d Lincoln, 1563/4). English church musician and composer. He was appointed organist and Master of the Choristers at Lincoln Cathedral in June 1537, but moved to Oxford in the autumn of 1538 to become informator choristarum at Magdalen College. Thomas Whythorne was then one of the choristers and, writing ...

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Iain Fenlon

(b Arezzo; fl 1591–c1600). Italian composer. The appearance of his earliest known work, Raggio di pura luce, in Orazio Tigrini's Secondo libro de madrigali a sei voci (RISM 1591²4) suggests that he may have been a pupil of Tigrini, who was at that time ...

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Clement A. Miller

(b Aachen, c 1492). South Netherlandish composer. He came from the diocese of Liège and studied music under Thomas Tzamen of Aachen. On 23 November 1510 he entered the University of Cologne where he met Heinrich Glarean, who later published Aquanus’s humanistic motet, ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b ?Aranda de Duero, c1495; d Coimbra, Feb 15, 1548). Spanish theorist. He studied music theory with Pedro Ciruelo at the University of Alcalá de Henares sometime before 1524; later he went to Italy for practical instruction. By 3 April 1528 he was ...

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(b Cairo Montenotte, nr Savona, Oct 18, 1546; d in or after 1600). Italian music editor. Fétis stated incorrectly that he was born at Novara. He was probably educated at Mondovì, but he spent most of his life in Rome, where he was a member of the Congregazione dell’ Oratorio (founded by Filippo Neri) and a friend and colleague of Giovenale Ancina. His only extant publication, ...

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G. Yvonne Kendall

(b Dijon, France, March 17, 1520; d Langres, France, July 23, 1595). French cleric and dance manual author. Born Jehan Tabourot, son of Pierre Tabourot and Valentine Henriette Dubois, Thoinot Arbeau’s Burgundian family included noted writers and architects. His education in Dijon and Poitiers resulted in a law degree and a career in the church. After joining the Order of St Anthony, also known as the Confrérie de Saint-Didier, the order assigned him to the post of canon for the Department of Haute Marne, which included the dioceses of Dijon and Langres. His uncle Jean Pignard served this latter as cathedral composer and master of music. Later Tabourot was appointed parish treasurer and inspector for diocesan schools in Bar-sur-Aube. In ...

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James Haar and Letitia Glozer

(b ?nr Namur, 1507; d Oct 14, 1568). Franco-Flemish composer. His output includes both sacred and, especially, secular music, and he was famed above all as a madrigalist.

Nothing is known of Arcadelt’s early life. His surname is suggestive of Flemish origin (as noted by Burney), a suggestion that would be confirmed if he could be identified with certainty as the ‘Jacobus flandrus’ admitted to the Cappella Giulia in ...

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Nigel Fortune and Tim Carter

(b Albano, late 1541 or 1542; d Florence, bur. Nov 14, 1612). Italian singer, lutenist and ?composer, husband of Vittoria Archilei . He was in the service in Rome of Cardinal Alessandro Sforza dei Conti di S Fiora, who died on 16 May 1581...

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Don Harrán

(b Cesena, 1515; d Padua, 1611). Italian grammarian, poet and rabbi. He refers to music in his treatise on Hebrew grammar, ‘Arugat ha-bosem’ (‘Bed of spices’), which survives in both a manuscript ( GB-Lbl Add.27011) and a printed source (Venice, 1602). Subjects of special relevance to music include accentuation, metres and poetical forms. Under accentuation, Archivolti describes the biblical accents (...

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Walter Pass

(b Cremona, 1550–60; d ?Prague, after1611). Italian composer and instrumentalist, active in Bohemia. From 1582 until 1612 he served at the imperial court at Prague, where there were other instrumentalists with the same surname, of whom the older Alberto Ardesi may have been his father. He published ...

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Ingrid Brainard

(b Solliès, [now Solliès-Pont, Var], late 15th century; d Saint Rémy, Bouches du Rhône, or Solliès, after 1543). French dance theorist and man of letters. In 1519 he began to study law at the University of Avignon, after completing his studies he joined the French troops that invaded Italy. Late in ...

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Frank A. D’Accone

(b Arezzo, bap. March 1, 1508; d Arezzo, July 19, 1584). Italian composer and priest. Although there is no evidence for the frequent assertion that he studied in Florence with Francesco Corteccia, his cordial relations with the Tuscan court (revealed in two extant letters and in the dedication to Francesco de' Medici of his ...

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Frank A. D’Accone

(b c1450; d Rome, 1508). Italian organist and organ builder. He was the son of the expatriate Greek scholar, Giovanni, who taught Greek philosophy at the Florentine Studio from 1456 to 1471. He studied both organ playing and organ building under Antonio Squarcialupi, who recommended him to Duke Galeazzo Maria Sforza of Milan. He was employed at the duke's court from ...

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James Haar

(b Reggio Emilia, Sept 8, 1474; d Ferrara, July 6, 1533). Italian poet and playwright. After moving with his family to Ferrara in 1484, he spent some time studying law (1488–93); but his interests lay in the field of literature, especially that of Latin antiquity. Forced as the eldest son to support his family after his father's death in ...

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José Quitin

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