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Marco Brusa and Herbert Seifert

(fl 1720–73). Italian composer. The earliest documentation of him is the score of the Oratorio della Madonna de' sette dolori; this bears a dedication to Emperor Charles VI, in whose service he already was at the time, signed ‘Ignatio Balbi Dilettante’ and dated ‘Milan, ...

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James L. Jackman and Marco Bizzarini

(b ?Brescia, c1683; d after 1768). Italian composer. Early historians name Rome as his birthplace, but some contemporary documents describe him as being from Brescia, where Baldassari was quite a common name. From his works it can be assumed that he was in Brescia in ...

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Winton Dean

(fl 1708–25). Italian soprano castrato. He was in the service of the Elector Palatine at Düsseldorf (c1708–14), where he sang a female part in Steffani’s Tassilone in 1709. In 1710–11 he was at the Berlin court as the agent of the elector and Steffani in an attempt to convert the King and Queen of Prussia to Catholicism. In ...

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Winton Dean

(fl 1714–35). Italian alto castrato. He came from Cortona and may have sung in three operas at Palermo in 1714–16. He appeared in 13 operas in Venice (1722–4, 1729 and 1733–5), including works by Gasparini, Orlandini, Giacomelli, Hasse and Leo, in Genoa (...

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Michael Talbot

(b ?Venice, 1700 or 1701; d Venice, Feb 1, 1733). Italian singer . Having sung contralto roles in operas performed in the provinces from as early as 1720, she made her Venetian début in Vignati’s I rivali generosi at S Samuele in 1726. Her career was short; the last opera in which she is known to have appeared was Orlandini’s ...

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(b ?Milan, c1680; d Milan, Feb 16, 1747). Italian composer. A Milan Cathedral document of 1714 discloses that he was 34 years old at the time and that he had served for an unspecified period as maestro di cappella of S Maria della Passione, Milan. His selection by the cathedral chapter followed a written examination on ...

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Charles Beare

(b ?Salisbury, July 14, 1727; d Salisbury, Feb 18, 1795). English violin maker and instrument dealer. He lived and worked in Salisbury and, with Forster, did much to raise the standard of English violin making in the second half of the 18th century. Banks possibly learnt his craft from a relative or in London, perhaps with Wamsley. His woodwork, using native sycamore for backs and sides and pine for tops, looks like that of Duke and Joseph Hill, but he had even more in common with William Forster (i), since both used a thick, dark red oil-varnish, previously unknown in England. Banks might have worked in London on his own for a time, but most of his instruments are labelled from Salisbury. Banks is, like Forster, particularly famous for the many cellos he made. His violas were of the small size fashionable at the time and are less appreciated now, but his violins, though rare, are very good instruments tonally and sometimes pass for Italian. Of the cellos, most are built on a reduced Amati pattern and are very similar to the work of the Forsters, both in appearance and tone. Occasionally, however, Banks made a cello with features of Stradivari, and these are excellent in every way. Bows were sometimes branded by him, though they were doubtless made for him, and he was careful to brand his instruments, sometimes in many places. Some of the later instruments were made for and branded by the London firm of Longman & Broderip, who also employed lesser makers....

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Neal Zaslaw

(b Paris, Jan 2, 1676; d Lunéville, Aug 14, 1755). French violinist and composer. His father was Jean-Baptiste Anet. About 1695–6 he travelled to Rome and studied under Corelli who, according to contemporary reports, was so pleased with Baptiste’s performance of his music that he ‘embraced him tenderly and made him a present of his bow’, and subsequently regarded him as an adopted son. During ...

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Christiane Bernsdorff-Engelbrecht

(b Oettingen, Aug 8, 1700; d Kassel, c1764). German composer, probably of French descent. He was a son of the dancing-master Johann Baptiste, who was at the Darmstadt court from 1703, and was taught dancing by his father. After 1718 he travelled to Paris, Italy and elsewhere in Europe, and in ...

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Colin Timms

(b ?Massa; fl 1723–41). Italian singer . He was in the service of the Duke of Massa and Carrara in 1724–5, the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt in 1729 and the Hereditary Prince of Modena from 1730 to 1736. He appeared in eight operas at Florence between ...

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(bap. Hanover, April 30, 1716; d ?London, after 1775). German composer and instrumentalist . He was the only son and eldest child of Bartholomäus Barbandt (b Hanover, 3 July 1687; d Hanover, 6 May 1764), a musician of the court orchestra at Hanover, and Maria Catharina Barbandt (née Caligari). The first member of the Barbandt family to settle in Hanover seems to have been Joseph, Bartholomäus's father, who, according to records of the parish of St Clemens, Hanover, had come from Modena. Charles followed the example of his grandfather and father and became a member of the Hanoverian court orchestra. Although records do not indicate which instruments he played there, it is likely that he was employed mainly as a woodwind player, as later he often appeared as an oboist, flautist and clarinettist. The exact date of his entry into the orchestra is unknown, but he is listed in its payrolls until ...

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Bruce K. Burchmore

(b Montferrand, nr Clermont-Ferrand, Oct 1675; d Clermont, Aug 1759). French amateur lutenist. He compiled an important late source of French Baroque lute music. During the final decade of the 17th century, following his law studies in Orléans, he was in Paris, where he probably received lute lessons. He was back in Clermont by ...

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Nicholas Temperley

(fl Castleton, Derbys., 1723–53). English psalmodist and ?composer. In 1723 he published the first edition of A Book of Psalmody in conjunction with John Barber. A second edition, by Robert Barber alone, followed in 1733, and a third, entitled David’s Harp Well Tuned...

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(fl Paris, c1716–42). French string instrument maker. He was particularly well known as a maker of viols and his instruments are highly valued as examples of French craftsmanship. The viol virtuoso Marin Marais is known to have owned an instrument by him. A lengthy description of his talent and skill survives in the correspondence of Jean-Baptiste Forqueray (...

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Olive Baldwin and Thelma Wilson

(d ?London, ?will proved Dec 9, 1757). English contralto. She first appeared in Almahide (November 1711) and the Spectator commented on her becoming shyness and her ‘agreeable Voice, and just Performance’. She had three seasons with the Italian opera, generally taking male roles, singing in Handel’s ...

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Colin Timms

( b Reggio nell'Emilia; fl 1720–43). Italian tenor . From 1720 to 1731 (at least) he was in the service of the Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt, governor of Mantua, where he made his earliest known appearance, in the première of Vivaldi's Candace (1720). The composer seems then to have engaged him for Venice, where he sang in 23 operas from ...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Lisbon, March 31, 1682; d Lisbon, Aug 9, 1772). Portuguese bibliographer. He matriculated in 1708 as a student of canon law at Coimbra University and on 2 July 1724 he was ordained a priest. On 4 November 1728 he became abad of the church of S Adrião at Cever in the diocese of Lamego. His life work was a four-volume bibliography of Portuguese authors, ...

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Jeannie Campbell

(bap. Edinburgh, Scotland, Dec 5, 1680; d Edinburgh, Sept 1753). Highland Scottish turner, evidently a bagpipe maker. In 1712 he made billiard balls for the officer in charge of Edinburgh Castle. On all the birth records of children born to Barclay and his wife Elizabeth Arbuthnet in Edinburgh parish, ...

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Nicholas Temperley

(b York, Aug 12, 1838; d London, Jan 28, 1896). English conductor and composer. He was the son of Thomas Barnby, an organist, and became a chorister at York Minster at the age of seven. In 1854 he went to London and entered the RAM. After holding positions as organist at various London and York churches, he received his first important appointment in ...

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Edward R. Reilly

(b Breslau, Feb 17, 1696; d Berlin, April 12, 1760). German lutenist, composer and writer on music. Neither Baron’s life nor his works have as yet been fully explored by scholars. His father Michael was a maker of gold lace and expected his son to follow in his footsteps. The younger Baron showed an inclination towards music in his youth, however, and later made it his profession. He first studied the lute from about ...