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Robert E. Eliason

(b 1736; d Philadelphia, Dec 29, 1804). American woodwind instrument maker of German birth. He was one of the earliest woodwind makers to take his skills to the New World. He arrived in Philadelphia about 1764 and continued in business as a turner and musical instrument maker until his death in ...

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Roger J.V. Cotte

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Elisabeth Cook

(b Vienna, Nov 2, 1755; d Paris, Oct 16, 1793). Queen of France and patron of opera . The daughter of Emperor Franz I of Austria, she received her early tuition from Gluck (clavecin and singing) and Noverre (dance and deportment). As dauphine (...

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Eugene K. Wolf and Jean K. Wolf

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Hanns Dennerlein

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Othmar Wessely and Suzanne Wijsman

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Barry S. Brook and Richard Viano

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Peter Branscombe

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Michaela Freemanová and Geoffrey Chew

Czech composer. He was a teacher in Nemyčeves near Jičín (1760–92), then in Kopidlno. Most of his work output consists of church music, but he also wrote the Opera de rebellione boëmica rusticorum, which deals with the great peasant rebellion in East Bohemia of ...

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Dale E. Monson

(b Martina Franca, Taranto, Oct 28, 1732; d Martina Franca, Jan 11, 1813). Italian soprano castrato and composer. His early musical training from his father, Fortunato (a notary and church singer), was followed when he was 19 by study with Gregorio Sciroli in Naples (thus his nickname). He made his début in Sciroli's ...

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Álvaro Torrente

(b ?Salamanca, c1710; d Salamanca, May 28, 1793). Spanish composer, organist and harpist. From about 1735 (there is documentary evidence from 1738) he was a performer in the Capilla de S Jerónimo of the University of Salamanca. From January 1741 he occupied the chair of music at the university, following Antonio Yanguas’s retirement in ...

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Michael F. Robinson and Piero Gargiulo

(b Naples, June 25, 1709; d ?Bologna, 1770). Italian composer. His first important engagement was on 29 October 1723, when he directed the music at a religious function in honour of S Gioseffo at S Maria la Nova, Naples. The Avvisi di Napoli...

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Robert Stevenson

(b Tudela, Navarre, bap. May 2, 1740; d Cuenca, Sept 24, 1820). Basque composer. After studying eight years with Luis Serra at the cathedral of Nuestra Señora del Pilar in Zaragoza, he competed for the music directorships of the cathedrals of Santo Domingo de la Calzada (...

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Gordana Lazarevich

(b Malta, 1713; d Naples, Nov 6, 1784). Italian organist and composer. In 1725 he entered the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo, Naples, where he remained for ten years; among his teachers were Gaetano Greco and Francesco Durante, and Pergolesi was a fellow student. Arena composed operas for Rome, Turin, Venice and Naples, and some of his music was included in ...

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John Rosselli

(b Como, c 1750–55; d after 1798). Italian castrato singer. Most of his career was spent in Russia. He sang the female leads in three successive seasons at the Teatro Argentina, Rome (1772–4), starting with Anfossi’s Alessandro nell’Indie, then appeared in Venice and Vienna, and reached St Petersburg in ...

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Julian Rushton and Manuel Couvreur

(b Aubignan, Carpentras, July 27, 1721; d Paris, Dec 2, 1784). French man of letters. As a boy he mixed with the many musicians in the service of the Italian prelates, attracted to Carpentras by generous stipends. Arnaud came to Paris from Provence in ...

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John A. Parkinson

(b c1740; d Lambeth, Jan 14, 1786). English composer. He was previously thought to be the ‘natural son’ of Thomas Arne mentioned by Burney. This comment, however, is now thought to refer to another son, Charles Arne, who was christened on 9 January 1734...