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Conservatory incorporated into the University of Rochester in 1921; see Rochester ; see also Libraries and collections.

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Conservatory founded in Rochester, New York, in 1921.

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School founded in Paris in 1784; in 1795 it was absorbed into the newly founded Conservatoire. See Paris, §VI, 5.

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Michael Mauskapf

Music education and social reform initiative. El Sistema, or Fundación del Estado para el Sistema Nacional de las Orquestas Juveniles e Infantiles de Venezuela, was founded by the Venezuelan economist José Antonio Abreu in 1975 and funded by the government’s Social Services Ministry. In Venezuela, the program has affected the lives of more than 300,000 children by fostering a deep connection between musical performance and a sense of self-worth. Thanks to the international success of several El Sistema alumni, most notably conductor Gustavo Dudamel, Abreu was awarded a ...

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Private schools for girls and young women, especially significant in the nineteenth century. As early as post-Revolutionary years, daughters of America’s upper middle and upper classes could obtain an education at female academies and seminaries. The names academy and seminary are equivalent; the former appears to have been favored in the early years. Leading institutions included Troy, Hartford, Ipswich, Cherry Valley, Mount Holyoke, and Music Vale Female Seminaries. Founded in ...

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Dale Hudson and Steven N. Kelly

State university located in Tallahassee. Originally named the Florida Institute in 1854, the school became Florida State College in 1901 and Florida State College for Women in 1909. In 1947 the institution became coeducational and was renamed Florida State University. Classes in music were among the first offered at the newly named college in ...

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A non-profit organization that exists to educate the public about traditional, contemporary, and multicultural folk music and dance and to promote, support, and advocate for the businesses and community that support it. Clark and Elaine Weissman of the California Traditional Music Society convened a meeting in Malibu, California, in ...

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French château, south of Paris, used for musical performances in the 17th and 18th centuries; see Paris, §V, 2. The American Conservatory, at which Nadia Boulanger taught, is at Fontainebleau.

Paris, §V, 2: Music at court outside Paris: Fontainebleau

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London conservatory founded in 1885 and amalgamated with the London Academy of Music in 1904. See London, §VIII, 3

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Gary Galván

Designated as tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations by the US Internal Revenue Code, foundations are further distinguished as either public charities or private foundations. Legally, public charities must receive at least one third of their support from a variety of sources such as active fundraising from the general public, gifts, grants, membership fees, and gross receipts for services related to their specified discipline. Public charities may provide support to other organizations or fund their own philanthropic endeavors. Conversely, private foundations typically derive funds from endowments provided by individuals, families, or corporations. Private foundations enjoy more narrow control over philanthropic direction, but they also face more legislative restrictions with fewer tax benefits....

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William McClellan and Jessica L. Getman

Social, professional, or honorary organizations for men or women, or both men and women. Such societies are well established in the American academic world. This article deals only with those in which music plays an important part or is the principal concern.

Greek-letter organizations originated in the United States at institutions of higher education in ...

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Romanian orchestra founded in 1868 in Bucharest. Previously known as the Romanian Philharmonic Society Orchestra, since 1955 it has borne the name of Romania’s most prominent composer, George Enescu. It is the oldest orchestra in Eastern Europe and its headquarters is the Palace of the Romanian Athenaeum, a concert hall with a capacity of 800, and a symbol of Bucharest’s cultural richness....

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Jason Freeman and Frank Clark

Interdisciplinary research centre for music, computing, engineering, design, and business, founded in 2008 at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. The Center focuses on the development and deployment of transformative musical technologies, and emphasizes the impact of music technology research on scholarship, industry, and culture. In ...

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Carl B. Hancock

State university founded in Athens in 1785. The university’s current enrollment exceeds 34,000 students. The Department of Music was established in 1928 with the hiring of alumnus Hugh Hodgson as the first professor of music, and was later named the Hodgson School of Music. The first degree programs were established between ...

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Romanian conservatory founded in 1919 in Cluj-Napoca in central Transylvania. It comprises today three main faculties: musical performance, music theory, and musical theatre. Since 1998, a fourth branch has been founded in the city of Piatra Neamţ, situated in a different region in northeast Romania. Initially founded as the Conservatory for Music and Dramatic Arts, the institution was also named the Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts (from ...

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Friedrich W. Riedel

Benedictine abbey near Krems, Lower Austria. It was founded in 1083 by Bishop Altmann of Passau as a monastery for prebendaries. In 1094 it was taken over by Benedictines from St Blasien in the Black Forest, and rapidly became an important centre of religious and intellectual life. After a period of decline during the Reformation, Göttweig flourished in the Baroque era, particularly under the abbot Gottfried Bessel (...

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Oliver Strunk

Italian monastery and library. Some 19 km from Rome, among the Castelli Romani in the Alban hills at an altitude of well over 320 metres, stands the monastery (Badia Greca) of Grottaferrata, founded in 1004 by St Nilus the Younger, a monk of the Greek rite from Rossano in Calabria. The site had been donated by Gregory, Count of Tusculum, and it took its name, as did the little town that grew up around it, from a late Roman remain, a sort of tomb or oratory with barred windows, adjoining which the monks built their church, dedicated on ...

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Organization for the promotion of contemporary music, based in Palermo.

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London conservatory founded in 1880; see London, §VIII, 3, (iv).

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Carlos de Pontes Leça

Portuguese organization for supporting the arts, charity, education and sciences. It was founded on 18 July 1956, in accordance with the will of Calouste Sarkis Gulbenkian (b Istanbul, 29 March 1869; d Lisbon, 20 July 1955), a pioneer of the Middle Eastern oil industry, an enlightened amateur of the arts and philanthropist. The foundation's headquarters are in Lisbon, but its activities, though centred in Portugal, extend to many other countries....