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Article

James Wierzbicki and Jonas Westover

(b Champaign, IL, Sept 25, 1937). American harpsichordist and pianist. He studied at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (BA 1961, MM 1963), where his harpsichord teacher was George Hunter; before his graduation he studied with the harpsichordist Gustav Leonhardt at the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam (...

Article

Michael Meckna

(b Clearfield, PA, June 10, 1890; d Kansas City, MO, Dec 22, 1951). American composer, organist, and pianist. From 1909 to 1912 he studied in New York at the Institute of Musical Art with Dethier Gaston M(arie) (organ), Caroline Beebe (piano), and percy Goetschius ...

Article

Weber  

Nancy Groce

American firm of piano makers. Albert Weber (i) (b Heilingenstadt, Bavaria, Germany, 8 July 1829; d New York, NY, 25 June 1879), a gifted pianist as a child, immigrated to New York in 1845. He apprenticed as a piano maker in the workshop of Charles J. Holden, then worked several years in Van Winkle’s piano factory. In ...

Article

Brian Boydell and Lance Whitehead

(b Borstendorf, Saxony, May 6, 1715; d Dublin, Ireland, bur. Oct 25, 1784). Irish keyboard instrument maker of German origin. His certificate of apprenticeship states that he learned organ building under Johann Ernst Hähnel of Lower Meissen between 10 Dec 1728 and the same date in ...

Article

Michael Fleming and Katie Buehner

(b Pittsburgh, PA, May 13, 1908; d Kendal-at-Hanover, NH, June 30, 1999). American pianist. He received his first musical training from his father, the founder and director of the Pittsburgh Conservatory, but his musical tastes were formed during his years of study in France (...

Article

Laurence Libin

(b Ahrenshoop, Germany, Jan 20, 1954). German organ builder and restorer. After army service and training with a cabinet maker, he was apprenticed to the Jehmlich firm in Dresden, rising to become head of restorations. For Jehmlich he supervised work on the 1714...

Article

John H. Baron

(b New Orleans, LA, 1871; d New Orleans, LA, Oct 21, 1956). American violinist, organist, and composer. He was the son of the engraver and music publisher Henri Wehrmann Sr. (c1827–1905). He began his musical training in New Orleans under Herms, E. Oweczka, and Charles F. Haase Jr. and went to Paris to study the violin with Auguste Kiesgen. On his return he was recognized as a virtuoso player and gave concerts in New Orleans and other southern cities as soloist and as leader of the Wehrmann Trio and Quartet and the Beethoven Quartet. He was organist at Trinity Church, New Orleans, and from ...

Article

Weigle  

Walter Supper

German firm of organ builders. It was founded in Stuttgart in 1845 by Carl Gottlieb Weigle (b Ludwigsburg, 19 Nov 1810; d 1882), formerly an apprentice to his brother-in-law, Eberhard Friedrich Walcker. Weigle built some 100 organs by 1880, when his son Wilhelm Theodor Friedrich Weigle (...

Article

Jonas Westover

(b Odessa, Ukraine, July 7, 1879; d New York, NY, Nov 2, 1956). American pianist and composer. He came from an important family with strong ties to the arts. He studied at the Moscow Conservatory and later was a pupil of Theodor Leschetizky in Vienna (...

Article

Peter Williams

A term coined probably by the Orgelbewegung of the 1920s to describe the system for building organs in which each ‘department’ or Werk (i.e. a keyboard with its chest or chests and pipes) has its own separate structure. For convenience the keyboards (manual or pedal) are brought together at one console, but the earliest examples of the ...

Article

Ryan D.W. Bruce

(b Brooklyn, NY, April 6, 1926). American jazz pianist, bandleader, composer, and club owner. Weston did not identify with his classical music lessons as a youth, choosing instead to explore a percussive piano style under the influence of Duke Ellington. Other early influences include Count Basie, Nat “King” Cole, Art Tatum, and Coleman Hawkins. Weston’s playing was transformed after attending a concert by Hawkins and Thelonious Monk in ...

Article

Margaret Cranmer

British firm of piano makers. The firm was founded in 1876 by W.M.Y. Maxwell to import and distribute Blüthner pianos from Leipzig to the British Isles. Later, he entered a partnership with W.J. Whelpdale (d 1913) and, following a fire at the uninsured London factory of Squire and Longson in ...

Article

Anne Beetem Acker

English family of virginal makers, active in London. Of 22 known English virginals, 7 were built by members of the family. Thomas (i) was the father of Thomas (ii), and Gabriel Townsend apprenticed with him, so he was almost certainly a virginal maker. Thomas (ii) (bur. London, ...

Article

Mary Robb

(b Illinois, Aug 27, 1881; d Dec 10, 1956, San Mateo, CA). American piano educator and writer. Whiteside received her earliest education at a public school in Vermillion, South Dakota. She majored in music at the University of South Dakota, graduating with highest honors in ...

Article

Peter Williams

A device for measuring wind pressure, usually that of organs, at the pipe chest, in the trunks, etc. According to German authors (Werckmeister, Adlung, Töpfer) a gauge was first invented by Christian Förner in 1667, but he may only have been publicizing a perfected example. The device had a single column of water which was raised a measurable extent when placed above any air vent (e.g. a pipe-hole in the chest). Töpfer (...

Article

Martin Renshaw

In an organ, the long, broad, but rather shallow wooden structure that collects wind under pressure from the Bellows or Reservoir and distributes it to the pipes as required. In the classical organ the heart of the wind-chest is a wooden grid, which is partitioned into as many grooves or note-channels as there are notes in the keyboard compass; above this are the table, stop mechanism and upperboard. Below the grid is an enclosed substructure, the pallet-box, which receives the wind from the wind-trunk and contains a row of pallets, one for each of the notes on the keyboard. Each ...

Article

A large wooden or metal tube for conveying the wind of an organ from the bellows to the Wind-chest. In medieval organs the one central wind-trunk was called fistula maxima.

Article

Martin Renshaw

In an organ, the long, broad, but rather shallow wooden structure that collects wind under pressure from the Bellows or Reservoir and distributes it to the pipes as required. In the classical organ the heart of the windchest is a wooden grid, which is partitioned into as many grooves or note channels as there are notes in the keyboard compass; above this are the table, stop mechanism, and upperboard (or ‘toe board’, on which the pipes stand). Below the grid is an enclosed substructure, the pallet box, which receives the wind from the wind trunk and contains a row of pallets, one for each of the notes on the keyboard. Each ...

Article

Jonas Westover

(b Michigan, 1949). American composer, pianist, producer, and guitarist. He is best known for his evocative and introspective solo piano works. He often draws on nature for his picturesque titles, perhaps responding to his time in the Midwest and areas such as eastern Montana. He did not receive any formal training, but instead learned to play the organ by ear in ...

Article

Anne Beetem Acker and Laurence Libin

German manufacturer of harpsichords, spinets, and clavichords of modern design (Serien Instrumente). The company was founded in Wolfratshausen by the organist Kurt Wittmayer (b Hermannstadt, 22 Nov 1917; d Bad Tölz, 4 Sept 1997) in 1949 after he moved from Munich, where he had begun building harpsichords in ...