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Robert Stevenson

(b c1548; d Granada, June 28, 1591). Spanish composer, son of Santos de Aliseda. From about 1557 to September 1577 when he was ordained, he was a member of the choir of Granada Cathedral. On 8 June, 1580 the chapter accepted him as successor to his father without the customary public competition. As ...

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Robert Stevenson

(d Granada, July 4, 1580). Spanish composer. He was appointed maestro de capilla of Granada Cathedral on 19 November 1557 despite the opposition of his predecessor, Luis de Cózar, who intended his own nephew to succeed him. After an unsuccessful appeal to the archbishop, Cózar was forced to hand over the charge of the choirboys to Aliseda in ...

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Alison Krauss, 2008.

AP Photo/Dave Martin

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Pseudonym of Alberta Hunter.

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(bChicago, Aug 31, 1904). Americansinger. Based in Chicago, she worked as a cabaret artist with Jimmie Noone (c1922), Carroll Dickerson (at the Sunset Cafe), and in a duo with Ollie Powers. She recorded two titles with Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five – ...

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Faik Chelebi

(b Agdash, May 28, 1927). Azerbaijani kamanca player. He began his education at a music school in Agdash in 1934. He studied at a college of music in the same town from 1941 to 1945, working as a kamanca player at a local theatre at the same time. In ...

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Laudan Nooshin

(b Tehran, 1951). Iranian tār and setār player, teacher and composer. He studied at the National Music Conservatory in Tehran from the age of 13 and then at the University of Tehran from 1970 to 1974; his teachers included Habibollah Salehi, Ali Akbar Shahnazi, Nur Ali Borumand, Abdollah Davami, Mahmud Karimi, Yusef Forutan, Said Hormozi, Dariush Safvate and Hooshang Zarif. From ...

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Laurie Shulman

(b Paris, Dec 29, 1814; d Marseilles, Jan 23, 1850). French bass-baritone . He began his career as a violinist, studying under Chrétien Urhan, but switched to singing in 1834, enrolling at the Paris Conservatoire. After earning first prize there in 1836, he made his début the following year as Saint-Bris (...

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(b Paris, 30 Nov 1813; d Paris, 29 March 1888). French pianist and composer. His real name was Morhange. He was one of the leading piano virtuosos of the 19th century and one of its most unusual composers, remarkable in both technique and imagination, yet largely ignored by his own and succeeding generations....

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Ebenezer Prout and David Fallows

An instruction to play an octave above the written pitch if the sign is placed above the notes (sometimes specified as ottava alta, or sopra); if an octave lower is intended, this is indicated by placing the sign below the notes or by specifying with ...

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Ebenezer Prout and Robert Donington

An instruction that any parts thus shown are to be taken as one part, either at the same pitch or (where the range of the voice or instrument implies it) at the octave (or double octave) above or below. It is frequently abbreviated to ‘unis.’. In orchestral scores the term is used to show that two or more instruments whose parts are written on the same staff are to play in unison; in the later 19th century the words ...

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All-in  

The final chorus of a lively piece, collectively improvised in a loud, spirited manner (seeForms, §2); the term is associated with early styles of jazz.

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Peter Wright

In the system of Proportional notation of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, another name for proportio dupla (time signature 2/1 or more commonly 𝇍), where note shapes diminish in relative value in the ratio 2:1. The tactus thus shifts from its normal place on the semibreve (...

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In the system of Proportional notation of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, another name for proportio quadrupla (time signature 4/1), where note shapes diminish in relative value in the ratio 4:1. The tactus thus shifts from its normal place on the semibreve (alla semibreve...

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In the system of Proportional notation of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, another name for proportio subdupla (time signature 1/2), where note shapes are augmented in relative value in the ratio 1:2. The tactus thus shifts from its normal place on the semibreve (...

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A term used to describe the normal tempo of late medieval and Renaissance music where the tactus falls on the semibreve, as opposed to the breve (alla breve) or other note shape. See Proportional notation.

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(b Chios, 1588; d Rome, Jan 19, 1669). Italian theologian and scholar of Greek origin. He went to Italy as a child and studied philosophy, theology, and classics in Rome at the Greek Catholic Collegio di S Atanasio from 1599 to 1610. After a period in Chios he studied medicine in Rome until ...

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Ken Rattenbury, Erik Kjellberg and Lars Westin

(bFalun, Sweden, Nov 7, 1934). Swedishtrumpeter. He studied piano from the age of six and became involved in jazz when he took up trumpet at the age of 14. After first playing professionally in Motala he moved to Stockholm, where as a jazz pianist he won an amateur contest in ...

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Edward Komara

(b Melrose, MA, April 1, 1921; d Annapolis, MD, Jan 29, 2003). American composer. Early studies with nadia Boulanger at the Longy School of Music (1941–2) were halted by service in the US Army in World War II, which he later documented in his memoir ...

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William Waterhouse

(b Sin-le-Noble, Nord, May 25, 1923). French bassoonist and teacher. A precocious talent, he won a premier prix at the Paris Conservatoire at the age of 17. He won a first prize at the Geneva International Competition in 1949 and was appointed to the Paris Opéra the same year. In ...